SBMF / BACKGRID

Kanye West seemed relaxed and worry-free after arriving in Miami on Sunday, following a family vacation with estranged wife Kim Kardashian-West and their four children.

A source tells ET that Kanye is "in a great place" after spending a week with Kim and their children, daughters North and Chicago and sons Saint and Psalm.

SBMF / BACKGRID

The source added that Kanye is "feeling creatively inspired" by the trip abroad for a little fun in the sun.

Paparazzi photos show the family, their nannies and security team exiting a private jet in Miami after vacationing in the Dominican Republic.

SBMF / BACKGRID

"The family seemed fine. The kids were having a great time," an eyewitness tells ET. "You could see [the kids] running around as they waited to get off of the plane. Kim got off the plane with the kids first. When they were about halfway down the runway Kanye exited the plane."

SBMF / BACKGRID

"Kim seemed fine and not worried at all; she had the kids close by her," the witness said. "Kanye didn’t seem worried either. He walked with his head up the whole time."

On Friday, the independent presidential candidate fired back at Wisconsin Democratic Party for spying on his presidential campaign.

In documents obtained by TMZ, Kanye claimed the Democrats hired a private investigator to spy on him, as part of an "organized effort of harassment and intimidation".

He also said the Democrats were wasting their time because nothing they turned up can harm his presidential chances.

"The goal is to win," he tweeted on Aug. 6.

Kanye needed 2,000 signatures from registered voters to get his name on the ballot in Wisconsin.

But the Wisconsin Democratic Party accused the rap producer of submitting bogus signatures. They included affidavits from people who claim they were "tricked" into signing their names.

According to TMZ, the Elections Commission will review the legal papers and make a recommendation whether to allow Kanye's name on the ballot.

He was already kicked off the ballot in his home state of Illinois, where election officials claim more than half of his submitted signatures were invalid.