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The New York Times published an exposé on Sunday, alleging that President Donald Trump committed "income tax avoidance" in 2016 and 2017. Trump called the exposé "fake news."

The paper claims Trump paid only $750 in income taxes in those years.

Unlike income tax evasion, income come tax avoidance is totally legal. Millions of Americans pay accountants to help them avoid paying taxes via tax write offs and deductions.

In Trump's case, he took advantage of an exploit in then-President Barack Obama's 2009 stimulus policy that wipes out taxes going back two years. In November 2009, the window was further opened another two years to wipe out taxes going back four years.

"Mr. Trump had paid no income taxes in 2008," according to the National Review. "But the change meant that when he filed his taxes for 2009, he could seek a refund of not just the $13.3 million he had paid in 2007, but also the combined $56.9 million paid in 2005 and 2006..."

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Bloomberg.com

This is not the first time the NYT has analyzed Trump's taxes. In 2016, the paper obtained Trump's 1995 tax return from an anonymous source.

The 1995 tax return showed Trump declared a $916 million loss. Tax laws allow such losses to be carried forward for many years -- offsetting taxes owed on future income.

Trump lost so much money in 1990 and 1991 - $250 million - that he didn't have to pay taxes for the next 8 years.

This is the so-called "income tax avoidance" that the Times claims Trump committed.

From 2005-2007 Trump paid a total of $70.1 million in income taxes. Trump actually paid more income tax than Amazon's Jeff Bezos, the richest man in America.

Like most Americans, Trump doesn't file his own taxes. He has a team of corporate accountants who file his taxes for him. Then another team of tax lawyers pore over the documents to make sure all tax laws, income and deductions are reported accurately.

The Times didn't find anything illegal in Trump's tax returns in 1995, 2016 or 2017. They even noted that all "questioners" looking for a smoking gun in Trump's Tax returns will be "unfulfilled".

Ironically, the New York Times paid no income tax last year.

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Mars Inc.

Parent company Mars Inc. has revealed the new brand logo for its 70-year-old line of rice products.

Mars Inc unveiled the new logo on Wednesday.

The Mars company dropped the name of Uncle Ben's rice brand earlier this year in an effort to "make meaningful changes across society."

Mars became the latest "woke" corporation to drop a Black brand logo that they claim was stigmatized as a "racial stereotype" after the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis in May.

"As we listen to the voices of consumers, especially in the Black community, and to the voices of our Associates worldwide, we recognize that one way we can do this is by evolving the Uncle Ben's brand, including its visual brand identity,' spokeswoman Caroline Sherman said in a statement in June.

The company, which is owned by PepsiCo, acknowledged that a majority of Black people did not ask for the changes, and some are even resistant to the logo/brand changes.

Many accused corporations of intentionally using the civil unrest in the U.S. to remove the iconic images of Black people from their packaging.

"When you are making these changes, you are not going to please everyone, said Fiona Dawson, president for Mars Food, multiples and global customers. "But it's about doing the right thing, not the easy thing."

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Quaker Co., Mars, Inc.

Quaker Oats announced in June that it would drop the iconic image of Aunt Jemima, who graced syrup and pancake mix packages for over a century.

Relatives of the original Aunt Jemima, whose image was used in the brand packaging for decades, objected to the company dropping her iconic image.

Quaker said packages without the Aunt Jemima image will begin appearing in stores by the end of the year. Quaker has not revealed its new packaging.

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Uncle P

To take advantage of the growing lack of Black faces on major food brands, rap mogul Master P announced his new line of "Uncle P" food products featuring his face on the packaging.

"I'm grateful that I'm in a position to add some diversity in packaged foods," the 50-year-old told CNN. "It's not just about having the Uncle P products, but also having a good cause behind it. I'm happy that I can make a difference in my communities."

Master P said he will donate a portion of profits to organizations that benefit inner city children and elderly in Black communities across the country.

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MRBIG_PHOTOGRAPHY/Getty Images

Norvell® is renaming its award-winning line of sunless tanning products in response to criticism that the "Black out" name promotes racism.

Norvell announced it is renaming the 'Competition Blackout' line of products to 'Competition Tan'.

The sunless tanning products are specifically for bodybuilders -- Black and white -- to help them achieve the bronzing look that they prefer during competitions.

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The products help bodybuilders to achieve a deep, dark bronzing tan without the damaging effects of the sun.

In a letter to "Dear valued customers," Norvell said the change is "an effort to respectfully represent our products to all customers".

Effective immediately, the products formerly named 'Competition Blackout' will not be available for purchase or shipment under the name 'Competition Blackout'.

When your inventory is depleted, we would kindly request the product line reflect the new name ‘Competition Tan’ on your website and other materials you may provide your customers.

We are also discontinuing select skus in the 'Competition Blackout' and 'Outshine' line – see below chart for status of each sku.

The ingredients and formulation of the 'Competition Tan' products will not change to ensure that artists and competitors get the same award winning Norvell color.

We anticipate products named 'Competition Tan' will be available for purchase and shipment in August. We will advise when the date is finalized.

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Johnson & Johnson will stop selling its line of popular skin whitening creams in the U.S. in response to criticism that the company promotes white skin as preferable over Black skin.

The pharmaceutical company announced its decision on Friday after multiple corporations decided to "retire" Black characters that served as logos on their consumer products for over a century.

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Johnson & Johnson

Johnson & Johnson will cease selling skin brightening products such as Neutrogena Clean & Clear dark spot reducer and Neutrogena Naturals skin brightener cream in the U.S.

"Conversations over the past few weeks highlighted that some product names on our Neutrogena and Clean & Clear dark-spot reducer products represent fairness or white as better than your own unique skin tone," reads a company statement. "This was never our intention — healthy skin is beautiful skin."

Johnson & Johnson will continue to sell the majority of skin whitening products in Asia.

The company will not remove products that are already on store shelves in the United States. But the products will not be replaced once supplies run out.

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Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms lashed out at Black businesses that reopened after Gov. Brian Kemp lifted restrictions last week.

The mother of four criticized Kemp for lifting restrictions too soon and she urged residents, particularly Black people, to stay indoors and avoid patronizing hair and nail salons.

The mayor lashed out at people who stood in line at Greenbriar Mall in southwest Atlanta to buy a pair of Air Jordans at a Black-owned shoe store on Saturday.

On Monday, Bottoms tweeted:

"For those who crowded at Greenbriar awaiting the new Jordans, gathered at Piedmont Pk, shot fireworks at the Mall West End & even those now shopping at Lennox Square Mall, know that the only thing that’s changed about Covid-19 is your chance of catching."

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In an op-ed for Breitbart News, political commentator and writer Rob Smith questioned the motive behind Mayor Bottoms' fear mongering.

"Mayor Bottoms will tell you that coronavirus fears are behind her warnings, but Georgia’s COVID-19 numbers lag far behind the rest of the country in terms of infections and deaths," he wrote.

Smith compared Atlanta's Covid-19 deaths, about 1,250, to the death toll in New York state, over 19,000 deaths, and concluded that Mayor Bottoms is over exaggerating when she claims reopening Atlanta would be "deadly".

"Mayor Bottoms says that beginning the path to reopening Georgia is 'deadly.' Yet while it is true that African Americans are disproportionately affected by COVID-19, it is also true that the vast majority of hospitalizations and deaths from the coronavirus are among older Americans with pre-existing health conditions."

Smith suggests Mayor Bottoms is willing to sacrifice Black businesses to ensure the Democratic party's chances of winning in November.

He accused Bottoms of attacking the "African American voter base" with "misinformation and conspiracy theories," that are "counterproductive to keeping Atlanta's citizens healthy in every way, including economically."

"Telling a young and healthy small business owner to wait until his or her business is fully destroyed with no chance of coming back because the "science" says so is the kind of messaging that will continue to hurt American citizens of all colors. Moreover, business owners should be given the opportunity to make decisions about their own businesses."

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As expected, Kevin Tsujihara - once the most powerful Asian mogul in Hollywood - has been forced out of his job as Warner Bros. Entertainment CEO and chairman. Tsujihara was allowed to gracefully "step down" from the job he's held for six years.

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Prominent Hollywood mogul Kevin Tsujihara - the most powerful Asian man in Hollywood - will soon be out of a job. The CEO and chairman of Warner Bros. Entertainment is entangled in a Hollywood casting couch scandal that was apparently arranged by Mariah Carey's ex-fiancé, James Packer.

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