Photo may have been deleted

Candace Owens is being dragged on Twitter for stating her opinions on the murder of George Floyd by a Minneapolis police officer.

Four cops were fired from the police force on Tuesday, a day after Floyd, who is Black, died from asphyxiation when a white cop kneeled on his neck for nearly 8 minutes (brain death occurs in 4 minutes).

Owens, a conservative, pro-Trump activist, angered Black Twitter when she suggested Black people act like a "trained chimpanzee" every time a Black person is murdered by a non-Black person.

In a livestream on YouTube, Owens compared Black people to the Scottish people who have passed the English people in engineering, and in the sciences, "because they challenged themselves to be better, and not to be worse."

She added:

"They didn't pretend that somehow having a broken language, having broken-down families was a symbol of who we are. And that is so unique to Black America. I won't subscribe to it. People say that's how you have to be Black.

"'That's how you have to be Black'? Listen to your psychological conditioning. If to be Black, you can't speak in proper English, or you're 'acting white.' Right? To be Black, you instantly have to jump up like a fucking trained chimpanzee - excuse my language - like a trained chimpanzee every single time the media runs a story, and act angry, and riot, and talk about how pained you were to see this happen to Black people, but keep your mouth shut, right, when it happens Black-on-Black because if you talk about the Black-on-Black crime, you're a race traitor, right?"

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

In an unexpected move, Facebook co-founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg sided with President Trump in his feud with Twitter co-founder and CEO Jack Dorsey.

After Twitter fact-checked one of Trump's tweets about mail-in-ballots, Trump threatened to end Twitter's immunity from liability (lawsuits) by signing an executive order today.

Trump tweeted that mail-in ballots would be "substantially fraudulent." But Twitter's CEO Jack Dorsey fact-checked Trump's tweet, essentially moderating the president.

"Per our Civic Integrity policy, the tweets yesterday may mislead people into thinking they don't need to register to get a ballot (only registered voters receive ballots). We're updating the link on @realDonaldTrump's tweet to make this more clear," Dorsey tweeted.

Trump's executive order removing Twitter's status as a public forum will not only affect Twitter adversely, it will also affect Facebook and other social media platforms.

Twitter and Facebook are privately owned companies and can not be regulated by Trump. But Trump can remove their protections by changing their status from public forums to publishers.

Publishers such as bloggers, who edit and delete content, are vulnerable to lawsuits and do not receive special protections from liabilities as forums do.

That's why Zuckerberg slammed Twitter's CEO Jack Dorsey, saying Twitter should stop policing what Trump tweets.

"I don't think that Facebook or internet platforms in general should be arbiters of truth," Zuckerberg told "Squawk Box" co-host Andrew Ross Sorkin in an interview that aired Thursday morning. "Political speech is one of the most sensitive parts in a democracy, and people should be able to see what politicians say."

Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Dorsey responded to Zuckerberg on Friday, tweeting:

"This does not make us an 'arbiter of truth.' Our intention is to connect the dots of conflicting statements and show the information in dispute so people can judge for themselves."

Ari Fleischer, former White House Press Secretary for George W. Bush, said Dorsey was "incredibly stupid" to correct Trump's tweets. "Where does it end? He hasn't done that to the Iranian president. He hasn't done that to Chinese leaders. Why is he doing it?"

Photo may have been deleted

YouTube viewers lashed out at vlogger Myka Stauffer and her husband James after they gave up their adopted son, Huxley, because he was too much to handle.

Myka and James earn thousands of dollars a month documenting their family on YouTube.com. The Stauffers have three biological children.

Their revenue increased when they documented the difficulties of trying to adopt baby Huxley from China.

Photo may have been deleted

YouTube.com

The couple celebrated when they were finally approved to adopt Huxley in 2017 when he was a baby.

Stauffer, of Ohio, told her 700,000+ YouTube subscribers he had "stolen" their hearts. Their subscribers were genuinely happy for them.

But this week, the couple confessed to rehoming Huxley, a 3-year-old who has special needs.

In a new video, Stauffer revealed that Huxley would be going to a "new forever home" after discovering he had additional medical needs beyond his autism and a brain cyst.

"After multiple assessments, after multiple evaluations, numerous medical professionals have felt that he needed a different fit in his medical needs," Stauffer said in her tearful video. "He needed more."

The couple's decision drew intense criticism on Twitter and other online platforms, as many accused her of exploiting the boy for profit and giving him up when he was no longer profitable to them.

Photo may have been deleted

YouTube.com

One viewer wrote: "I'm sorry but you did fail as a mum. You wouldn't have given up your own child."

Stauffer claimed the accusations were "insidious" and "hurtful." She added: "Do I feel like a failure as a mom? Like, 500 per cent."

Stauffer also claimed that she and her husband have not shared "95 per cent of the struggles" they had with Huxley and she could not share any more details out of respect for the boy's privacy.

The YouTuber went on to say that she and her husband have been updated on his progress and experts found him a family "they felt would ultimately be the best fit".
 

Source: WENN.com

Photo by WENN/Avalon

Cardi B spoke out about the riots and looting in Minneapolis, Minnesota in response to the murder of George Floyd in police custody.

Floyd, 46, was strangled to death by an ex-Minneapolis police officer who kneeled on his neck for nearly 8 minutes while Floyd repeatedly said he couldn't breathe.

Photo may have been deleted

Derek Chauvin, the cop who kneeled on Floyd's neck, and three other police officers were fired from the police force a day after Floyd died. But that wasn't enough for Floyd's family, who demanded arrests.

Riots rocked south Minneapolis, as hundreds of protesters threw rocks, bottles and empty tear gas canisters at police wearing riot gear.

Star Tribune via Getty Images

Images and videos of rioting, arson and looting blanketed social media on Wednesday and Thursday.

Rapper Cardi B said the protesters had no choice but to riot since their demands have not been met and no arrests have been made.

"They looting in Minnesota and as much as I don't like this type of violence it is what it is," she tweeted on Wednesday. "Too much peaceful marches, too much trending hashtags, and NO SOLUTIONS! The people are left with NO CHOICE."

Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Peaceful protests escalated to violence on day 2 of civil unrest in response to George Floyd's death in south Minneapolis, Minnesota on Wednesday evening.

Riots rocked south Minneapolis, as hundreds of protesters threw rocks and bottles at police wearing riot gear.

Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Rioters smashed every window inside Minneapolis Police's 3rd precinct. Heavily armed police stood guard in front of the one window left intact.

Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Protesters set fire to stores, including an AutoZone. Police fired rubber bullets, tear gas and stun grenades to disperse crowds. Dozens of injuries were reported. But protests remained peaceful at Cup Foods, where Floyd was killed in police custody on Monday.

Photo may have been deleted

The unrest spread to Los Angeles, where over 1,000 Black Lives Matter protesters blocked an L.A. freeway and destroyed at least one cop car.

Videos posted by citizen journalists and reporters showed scenes of unrest and looting in Minneapolis.

Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

A Target store was hard hit by looters who walked out with TVs, clothing, appliances, toys and household goods, while cops were busy with rioters in other parts of the city.

Congresswoman Ilhan Omar, a Democrat who represents Minnesota, tweeted:

"Shooting rubber bullets and tear gas at unarmed protesters when there are children present should never be tolerated. Ever. What is happening tonight in our city is shameful. Police need to exercise restraint, and our community needs space to heal."

President Trump tweeted about George Floyd, promising "Justice will be served!"

Photo may have been deleted

Former Vice President Joe Biden commented on Floyd, comparing his murder to the case of Eric Garner, who died when a cop used an illegal chokehold on him during an arrest for selling loose cigarettes in New York in 2014.

"George Floyd's life mattered. It mattered as much as mine, it matters as much as anyone's in this country." Biden said.

"Watching his life be taken in the same manner, echoing nearly the same words as Eric Garner more than five years ago — 'I can't breathe' — is a tragic reminder that this was not an isolated incident, but part of an ingrained systemic cycle that exists in this country."

Biden added: "It cuts at the very heart of our sacred belief that all Americans are equal in rights and in dignity."

Photo may have been deleted

George Floyd, the unarmed Black man who was killed in police custody in Minneapolis on Monday, was a "gentle giant" to those who knew him, says his fiancée.

The 46-year-old trucker moved from Houston to Minneapolis about five years ago to search for a better job.

His fiancée Courteney Ross, said his daughter stayed behind in Houston, along with his family and friends.

Ross called for protesters to forgive the cop who killed her fiancé.

"You know, if he was here, he would say that he's a man of God. He would stand on that firmly," Ross said.

"He stood up for people, he was there for people when they were down, he loved people that were thrown away," Ross said. "We prayed over every meal, we prayed if we were having a hard time, we prayed if we were having a good time."

Ross said she knows the community is hurting, and she hopes they respond in a way that honors Floyd.

"You can't fight fire with fire. Everything just burns, and I've seen it all day -- people hate, they're hating, they're hating, they're mad. And he would not want that. He wouldn't, he wouldn't, he wouldn't. He would give grace -- I stand on that today -- he would still give grace to those people," she said.

Ross said Floyd's mother died about a year ago. She believes his mother's spirit was there with him when he took his last breath.

Photo may have been deleted

Kwame Kilpatrick will serve out the rest of his 28-year prison sentence, the Bureau of Prisons announced on Tuesday night.

Rumors spread this week that the former Detroit mayor, who was sentenced to 28 years on corruption charges, would receive an early release after inmates died during a Covid-19 outbreak at Oakdale federal prison complex in Louisiana.

Reports claimed Kilpatrick, 49, would be released to his mother's home in Georgia this week.

Kilpatrick's friends and family's were hopeful when state lawmakers appealed to President Donald Trump on his behalf.

The ex-husband of Kilpatrick's sister confirmed the rumors after claiming to have seen an email from Kilpatrick himself advising them of his impending release.

But on Tuesday, May 26, the federal Bureau of Prisons said Kilpatrick will remain incarcerated at the federal correctional institution in Oakdale to serve out his 28-year sentence.

Corrections officers sued the prison over the lack of masks and gloves for their protection when they come in contact with infected inmates.

Other high-profile inmates have since walked out of federal prisons, including Trump's former campaign manager Paul Manafort, Trump's former consigliere Michael Cohen, and Black Mafia Family drug kingpin Terry "Southwest T" Flenory.

Photo may have been deleted

Protesters located the home of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, the officer directly responsible for the death of George Floyd while in police custody.

Chauvin and three other cops were fired Tuesday, a day after Floyd died.

Video uploaded to YouTube.com shows protesters surrounding Chauvin's home and vandalizing his driveway with the words "F**k Killer Cops" in chalk.

Others wore t-shirts with the words "I can't breathe" on the front.

At one point in the footage, the NWA song "F**k the police" can be heard playing in the background.

Some protesters prevented a Door Dash driver from delivering food to the home.

Wednesday's peaceful protests was in contrast to the demonstrations on Tuesday outside a Minneapolis police precinct and the site where Floyd died.

Protesters broke glass doors at the precinct and threw bricks at patrol cars. Police clashed with protesters in the street and fired tear gas canisters to disperse the crowds.
 

Photo may have been deleted

Newly released video footage shows a Black man being dragged from his car and manhandled by Minneapolis police before he died in their custody minutes later.

George Floyd, 46, died after a cop kept his knee on his neck for nearly 8 minutes. The officer was fired Tuesday along with three other cops who stood by and did nothing to help Floyd while he was in distress.

Minneapolis police responding to a 911 call about a "forgery" on Monday, May 25, found Floyd sitting in his car outside Cup Foods, a neighborhood grocery store.

New footage, obtained by FOX 9 News, shows the moments leading up to the deadly confrontation. Two officers are seen dragging Floyd from his car and manhandling him.

One cop handcuffs Floyd's hands behind his back while he is not resisting arrest. Additional footage from a nearby restaurant shows Floyd sitting on the ground as a cop speaks to him before picking him up and holding him against a wall.

Another officer escorts Floyd to a patrol unit before the video ends.

A video uploaded to Facebook shows Floyd on the ground with a cop pressing his knee down on his neck. The officer continues to apply pressure to Floyd's neck while the victim complains repeatedly that he can't breathe.

Several bystanders pleaded with the cop to get off of Floyd while he was handcuffed and helpless on the ground.

Floyd eventually fell silent and lapsed into unconsciousness. He died later at a hospital.

Attorney Ben Crump who is representing the family told NBC Today he believes Floyd's death would have been swept under the rug if the video didn't exist.
 

Photo may have been deleted

Christian Cooper is not down with the "cancel culture" that destroys the lives of people they disagree with.

Christian asked a white woman to leash her dog in Central Park, but the woman, named Amy Cooper (no relation), called 911 to complain that she felt "threatened" by a Black man.

"I'm going to tell them there's an African-American man threatening my life," she said to him while dialing.

Christian filmed her meltdown on his cellphone, and when the video went viral, her life was "canceled" by social media users. She lost her job and the animal shelter took back her dog.

Now Christian says social media went too far.

"It's a little bit of a frenzy, and I am uncomfortable with that. If our goal is to change the underlying factors, I am not sure that this young woman having her life completely torn apart serves that goal," he told the NY Times.

Others called for an end to the cancel culture phenomenon fueled by social media which doesn't believe in second chances.

Comedian Kevin Hart spoke out about cancel culture, saying "Nobody's going to be perfect."

"Life isn't over because people say it is, and that's what's been happening as of late," Kevin told Oprah on Instagram Live.

"It's like people determine when your end button is pushed, but that's not how it works. We need to lose that attitude and feeling and let people grow. People love to talk shit... people love to be negative, but guess what? They also love to be positive. But we only talk about the negative."

 

This is an open post where you can discuss any subject matter. This post will not be censored or moderated. Disqus may automatically moderate certain words considered offensive. There are no rules in Open Posts. So enter at your own risk.

Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

Protesters clashed with police at an "I Can't Breathe" rally outside the 3rd Precinct Police Station in Minneapolis, Minnesota to protest the death of George Floyd who died in police custody. Four Minneapolis police officers have been fired after a video taken by a bystander was posted on social media showing Floyd's neck being pinned to the ground by an officer as he repeatedly said, "I can't breathe". Floyd was later pronounced dead after being transported to Hennepin County Medical Center.
 

Star Tribune via Getty Images

A man prays in front of the growing memorial for George Floyd who died in police custody on Monday in Minneapolis, Minnesota. An FBI investigation is underway following a fatal encounter between Floyd and Minneapolis police. In a statement early Tuesday, police said the man had a medical incident during an attempted arrest. However, video of the encounter shows an officer with his knee on the mans neck for at least eight minutes. Before the man lost consciousness, he repeatedly told officers that he couldn't breathe.
 

Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

Over 1000 people attended a rally outside the 3rd Precinct Police Station in Minneapolis, Minnesota to protest the death of George Floyd who died in police custody. Demonstrators clashed with the Minneapolis police outside a police station on Tuesday, May 26, 2020.
 

Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

A demonstrator holds up an "I can't breathe" sign outside the 3rd Precinct Police Station in Minneapolis, Minnesota to protest the death of George Floyd who died in police custody. Demonstrators clashed with the Minneapolis police outside a police station on Tuesday, May 26, 2020.
 

Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

People attend an "I can't breathe" rally on Tuesday outside the 3rd Precinct Police Station in Minneapolis, Minnesota to protest the murder of George Floyd who died in police custody on Monday, May 25, while in police custody in Minneapolis, Minnesota.
 

Star Tribune via Getty Images

Motorcycle gangs joined protesters at the Cup Foods store at Chicago Ave. and East 38th Street, the site where George Floyd died on Monday, May 25, while in police custody in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Demonstrators clashed with the Minneapolis police outside a police station on Tuesday, May 26, 2020.
 

Star Tribune via Getty Images

Children play in the street while their parents participate in a rally for George Floyd at Chicago Ave. and East 38th Street during a rally in Minneapolis on Tuesday, May 26, 2020.
 

Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

People attend an "I can't breathe" rally on Tuesday outside the 3rd Precinct Police Station in Minneapolis, Minnesota to protest the murder of George Floyd who died in police custody on Monday, May 25, while in police custody in Minneapolis, Minnesota.
 

Star Tribune via Getty Images

Protestors slash tires and smash windows on an empty police vehicle near the Minneapolis 3rd Police Precinct in Minneapolis on Tuesday, May 26, 2020. Federal authorities are investigating a white Minneapolis police officer for possible civil rights violations, after a video surface showing him kneeling on a handcuffed African-American man's neck and ignoring the man's protests that he couldn't breathe. The man later died. An attorney for the man’s family identified him as George Floyd.
 

Star Tribune via Getty Images

Police armed with assault rifles lob tear gas canisters to disperse the crowd demonstrating against the death of George Floyd outside the Minneapolis 3rd Police Precinct on Tuesday, May 26, 2020.
 

Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images

Demonstrators hold an upside down B&W American flag after protesting near the spot where George Floyd died while in custody of the Minneapolis Police on Monday in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The protests lasted into the night on May 26, 2020.

Photo may have been deleted

Getty Images

Shaun King is back in the headlines for raising donations for one of his causes without explaining what he does with the money.

Critics say that whenever King runs out of cash to finance his family's lavish lifestyle, he comes up with a new investment opportunity for his followers to donate.

Last year, King, who was born Caucasian but claims to be Black, collected more than $1.5 million to relaunch Frederick Douglass' abolitionist newspaper, The North Star.

It was a worthy cause with promises to employ about 50 journalists. But, as usual, his big plans went but and the money he raised went down the rabbit hole.

The North Star's former editor-in-chief, Keisha N. Blain, wrote in a tweet:

"So many people warned me about him and I didn't listen. But I learned through experience -- not rumors or innuendoes but real life experience with a liar & a fraud."

Another Twitter activist, DeRay McKesson, stopped short of calling King a con artist in a tweet on Tuesday, May 26.

"Shaun King is running a long con & this is just the tip of the iceberg.

At the very least, he needs to:

1. Immediately & publicly release all former North Star staff from NDAs w/ no penalty.

2. Stop soliciting funds altogether, immediately."

In a lengthy article by the DailyBeast.com titled "Shaun King Keeps Raising Money, and Questions About Where It Goes," the writer hinted that King might face criminal or civil charges this time around.
 

This is an open post where you can discuss any subject matter. This post will not be censored or moderated. Disqus may automatically moderate certain words considered offensive. There are no rules in Open Posts. So enter at your own risk.

Photo may have been deleted

Two Minneapolis police officers are on paid leave after a video shows one of the cops pinning a Black man on the ground with a knee on his neck. The man, who was handcuffed, repeatedly said he could not breathe. He later died.

The video, which was recorded on May 25, was uploaded to Facebook by a user named Darnella Frazier. She is heard asking the officer why his knee is on the man's neck when he's not resisting arrest.

Photo may have been deleted

The man was identified as George Floyd. Floyd, who was face down on the ground, repeatedly groaned and complained that he couldn't breathe. His nose was bleeding and his arms were handcuffed behind his back.

"My stomach hurts. My neck hurts. Everything hurts... Water or something. Please. Please. I can't breathe, officer... I cannot breathe. I cannot breathe."

Eventually, he stopped moving and appeared to fall unconscious.

"That's bulls—t, Bro," said a male bystander. "You're stopping his breathing right there, Bro. Get him off the ground, Bro. You're being a bum right now."

A police statement said the cops responded to a call about a "forgery in progress." They found the man sitting in a blue car and he "appeared to be under the influence," according to the report obtained by Yahoo News.

"After he got out, he physically resisted officers. Officers were able to get the suspect into handcuffs and noted he appeared to be suffering medical distress. Officers called for an ambulance."

 

Photo may have been deleted

A white woman who called 911 on a Black man for asking her to leash her dog has apologized for her insensitivity and poor impulse control.

Amy Cooper, who was dubbed "Karen" on Twitter.com, told CNN she wanted to apologize to "everyone" who was offended by her actions.

According to Urbandictionary.com, "Karen" is a pejorative term, similar to "Becky", that expresses contempt or disapproval of white women who fit a pattern of socially disagreeable behavior.

"I'm not racist," she said. "I did not mean to harm that man in any way."

Amy Cooper said she was walking her dog between 7:30 a.m. and 8 a.m. Monday in an area of NY's Central Park called The Ramble, when she encountered Christian Cooper (no relation), who asked her to leash her dog.

Central Park policy requires dogs to be leashed at all times. But Amy took offense at Christian's demands and she called 911 to report she felt threatened.

Christian recorded the encounter because things tend to go left whenever the police get involved.

By the time police arrived on the scene, both Coopers and the dog were gone. But Christian's video went viral on social media, sparking outrage.

Amy Cooper lost her job and gave up her dog amid the chaos. She told CNN her entire life is destroyed.

"I think I was just scared," Amy told CNN. "When you're alone in the Ramble, you don't know what's happening. It's not excusable, it’s not defensible."

When asked if he’d accept her apology, Christian told CNN he would "if it's genuine and if she plans on keeping her dog on a leash in the Ramble going forward, then we have no issues with each other."

AFP via Getty Images

Former Vice President Joe Biden and his wife Jill Biden left their Delaware home to lay a wreath at Delaware Memorial Bridge Veteran's Memorial Park on Memorial Day in the U.S.

It was the 77-year-old senator's first appearance in public since the coronavirus lockdowns began in March.

The presumptive Democratic nominee and his wife paid their respects to fallen service members in Newcastle, Delaware on Monday, May 25.

AFP via Getty Images

The Bidens dressed in black with matching black face coverings. Biden wore black aviator sunglasses. A small crowd gathered to observe the Bidens as they left the memorial park.

In neighboring Maryland, U.S. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump lay a wreath for fallen soldiers at Baltimore's Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine.

"To every Gold Star Family here today and all across our land, our debt to you is infinite and everlasting. We stand with you today and all days to come," the president said in his prepared speech.

Earlier Monday, President Trump, Vice President Mike Pence, and Defense Secretary Mark Esper participated in a wreath-laying ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery.