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Remember the hackers who attacked a New York City law firm that represents bold name celebrities and pro athletes?

The hacker group, which calls itself REvil, hacked into the computer network at the prestigious law firm owned by Allen Grubman earlier this year.

They threatened to leak dirt on celebrities and politicians, such as President Trump, if they didn't receive ransom money by a certain date.

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Well, the ransom wasn't paid, so the group posted a new message on the dark Web saying it will "auction" off the dirt it allegedly has on LeBron James, Nicki Minaj and Mariah Carey, and others starting at $600,000 per star.

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The group also threatened to auction off information on the Democratic Party, Sean Combs's Bad Boy Records and other companies for $1 million per company.

The group claims to have information pertaining to the Democrats bribing celebrities and sexual harassment by top politicians.

The group wrote: "Bribery celebrity's [sic] by the Democratical [sic] party, sexual harassment by top politicians, envy of celebrity’s for each other ... all of that is waiting for you in files of Grubman company."

It isn't clear which media outlet or blog has that kind of cash in today's economy to pay for dirt on washed up rappers (Nicki) and pro athletes who are nearing retirement (LeBron).

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Instagram

This was the scene in the Harlem neighborhood of NYC on Wednesday, as hundreds of mask-free rap fans danced in the streets and blocked traffic to shoot a music video by rapper Casanova.

Judging by this scene - and other scenes like it on social media - you wouldn't know the United States in the midst of a record 45,000 jump in COVID-19 cases this week as the global total of coronavirus cases nears 10 million.

Health officials say the spike in the number of cases is thanks to the "complacency" of young people across the south and the west.

The 45,000 cases reported on Wednesday tops the late April record of 36,000 cases in a single day.

The news comes as many states are reopening and allowing salons, barbershops, restaurants and bars to resume operations.

Seven states, including California, Florida, Oklahoma and Texas saw record spikes in confirmed cases, but the coronavirus death rate has plummeted nationwide.

New York, NJ and Connecticut have all said they will be reinforcing quarantine orders and targeting travelers from out-of-state.

Out-of-state travelers will be fined as much as $10,000 if they don't agree to quarantine for 14 days.

People I spoke with online believe the virus is being weaponized for political purposes. Others who once were afraid have moved on with their lives, saying the coronavirus is just another flu.

The Trump administration vows there will not be another nationwide lockdown like the one that crippled the U.S. economy and led to a record number of job losses.

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Chrystul Kizer was 17-years-old when she killed the man who sexually abused her in 2018. A bail fund charity paid her $400,000 bond on Monday.

Now 19, Kizer walked out of a Wisconsin jail carrying a bag full of letters she'd received from supporters.

Kizer was arrested and charged with the murder of Randall Volar, 34, in Kenosha, Wis. on June 5, 2018.

She is accused of shooting Volar twice in the head, then setting fire to his home. On the day he died, police planned to arrest Volar for child sex trafficking.

Kizer had been awaiting trial on murder charges when she was granted bond. She still faces charges of arson and premeditated homicide which carries a life sentence in prison.

Her case received national attention from supporters and activists who say she acted in self-defense and was a victim of sex trafficking.

Kizer told police that her relationship with Volar involved sexual abuse in addition to money and gifts.

She said he earned money by arranging hookups for her with men in hotel rooms. "He was a grown up and I wasn't," she said. "So I listened."

Police say Volar's estate was worth $800,000. He made large bank deposits and other activities typical of sex traffickers.

Her case drew comparisons to Cyntoia Brown, who received a life sentence for killing a John when she was a teenage prostitute.

Now 32, Brown was granted clemency in January 2019 after serving 15 years in prison.

Brown voice her support for Kizer last year. She posted a photo of herself wearing a hoodie with the words "Justice 4 Chrystul Kizer" on the front.
 

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Baseball Hall of Famer Curt Shilling deleted his Twitter on Wednesday after comparing NASCAR driver Darrell "Bubba" Wallace Jr. to disgraced actor Jussie Smollett.

A crew member found what he said was a noose hanging in the garage at Talladega Superspeedway on Sunday.

The "noose" was actually a garage door pull cord. Similar pull cords were hanging at every door in the Talladega garage.

NASCAR officials announced the finding of the "noose" to the public and called in the FBI, who sent 15 agents to Alabama to investigate the pull cord.

The FBI concluded there was no hate crime. The pull cord was in place in the garage since October 2019.

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In a tweet on Wednesday, the former Boston Red Sox pitcher compared Wallace, 26, to 38-year-old Smollett, who was indicted in 2019 for staging a hate crime attack on himself.

"So we have @JussieSmollett v 2.0? Where is the media recanting their idiocy? Shilling tweeted. "It was all a lie."

This isn't the first time Shilling made a controversial statement on social media. He was fired by ESPN in 2016 for sharing an anti-transgender meme on his Facebook page.

Wallace thanked NASCAR and his team on Wednesday afternoon.

"It's been an emotional few days. First off, I want to say how relieved I am that the investigation revealed that this wasn't what we feared it was. I want to thank my team, NASCAR and the FBI for acting swiftly and treating this as a real threat. I think we'll gladly take a little embarrassment over what the alternatives could have been. Make no mistake, though some will try, this should not distract from the show of unity we had on Monday, and the progress we've made as a sport to be a more welcoming environment for all."

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Richard Atikins, a board member for Central Unified School District in Fresno, Calif. resigned after a blogger mobilized her Instagram followers to get him fired.

Californians have endured ongoing protests as Black Lives Matter and Antifa organizations clash with police while attempting to tear down historic statues.

Atkins allegedly wrote an Instagram post urging protesters to "go back to the country you or your ancestors came from."

He added, "I am SICK of this shit."

Instagram blogger @gossipofthecity_ urged her followers to call the board and demand his termination.

"Call up @centralusd right now at their board meeting & demand Richard Atkins be terminated . Call : 559-276-3150."

Atkins apparently resigned during the board meeting on Tuesday.

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Bill Cosby's wife Camille is looking forward to her husband coming home while getting a chance to appeal his sexual assault conviction.

The disgraced comedian was sentenced to 3 to 10 years in prison in 2018 after he was found guilty of drugging and raping Temple University staff member Andrea Constand in 2004.

The star has repeatedly tried and failed to have the conviction overturned, arguing he did not receive a fair trial.

On Tuesday, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court agreed to review two aspects of the case against Cosby.

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court will also examine whether a prosecutor told Cosby he will not face criminal charges in Constand's case after she accepted a financial settlement from the actor.

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Camille is feeling optimistic that he will be released home while his case is under appeal.

She told ABC News Prime: "There are possibilities now. Finally, there is a court ... that has said, 'Wait a minute. There are some problems here. They can be considered for appeal.'"

She added: "I am very, very pleased... but now I'm looking at something that is possible. Possible for vindication. That is the goal."

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The 82-year-old comedian has been incarcerated for almost two years, but producer Camille said she has not visited her husband in prison.

"I do not want to see my husband in that kind of environment, and he doesn't want me to see him in that kind of environment either."

Camille insisted she and her husband communicate every day by phone.

Cosby's representative revealed the actor was "extremely thankful" to the court judges for granting him an opportunity to fight the case, reported Variety magazine.

"As we have all stated, the false conviction of Bill Cosby is so much bigger than him - it's about the destruction of ALL Black people and people of color in America," the spokesperson added.

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Bubba Wallace, NASCAR's only Black or biracial driver, continues to insist he was a victim of a racist incident at Talladega.

A crew member found what he says was a noose hanging in the garage at Talladega Superspeedway on Sunday.

The crew member and NASCAR officials apparently didn't notice that the same type of rope with a loop at the end was appended to all garage doors.

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Instead of investigating the matter thoroughly, NASCAR officials announced the finding to the public and called in the FBI, who sent 15 agents to Alabama to investigate the pull cord.

The agents collected the evidence -- the pull cord -- and sent it to Quantico, Virginia for analyses. They interviewed dozens of drivers and crew members and reached the conclusion that no hate crime was committed.

The pull cord, they say, was in place in the garage since October 2019. And no one could have known that Wallace would be assigned that same garage bay in June 2020.

The FBI also found similar pull cords with hand loops at every garage door. This image from a 2017 video shows the pull cords.

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NASCAR

Despite the FBI's conclusion, Wallace, 26, continues to insist the pull cord was a "straight up noose".

Wallace told NBC's TODAY on Wednesday that he was "relieved" he wasn't targeted, but he claimed someone tied the rope into a “noose" -- even if it was targeted at him.

"I've never seen anything like it," Wallace said, confirming that he did indeed see the pull cord.

Wallace said after he learned about the rope, he was "adamant" that he searched the garages to make sure it wasn't a pull rope.

"When I did find out, I was adamant about searching all the other garages and making sure that this wasn't a garage pull, and it ended up being one," he told NBC.

But even after admitting it was a pull rope, Wallace told "The View" on Tuesday that the rope was meant as a racist symbol.

Wallace became the laughing stock of NASCAR on Tuesday. Social media has dubbed him "Bubba Smollett" after disgraced actor Jussie Smollett who pulled a similar hate crime stunt in Chicago that ended his career.

"It's still frustrating to know that people are always going to test you and always just gonna try and debunk you," Wallace told NBC. "That's what I'm trying to wrap my head around now, from them saying that I'm fake and all this stuff, and I reported it when it was news that was brought to me, it was information that was brought to me that was already reported. So I was just kind of following suit."

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Family, friends, dignitaries, elected officials and community leaders gathered Tuesday to remember the life of Rayshard Brooks at Historic Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta.

The 27-year-old Black man was shot and killed by an Atlanta police officer on the night of June 12th. His death sparked national and international outrage.

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Tomika Miller, the wife of Rayshard Brooks, weeps while holding their 1-year-old daughter Dream during his funeral in Ebenezer Baptist Church.

According to a press release, Brooks' family selected Ebenezer Baptist Church for the private funeral service because of its global historic presence.

"We're here to provide ministry as they walk through the valley of the shadow of death," said Rev. Raphael G. Warnock, Senior Pastor of Ebenezer. "It's Ebenezer's mission to show up in a time like this, especially given the way he lost his life."

Pastor Warnock added: "Rayshard was not a member of our church but his loved ones are a part of our family. We are a sanctuary for the suffering. We are a house of prayer for all people."

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Notable guests included Atlanta Mayor Keisha Bottoms, former Mayor Kasim Reed, Rev. Bernice King, former Georgia Gubernatorial Candidate Stacey Abrams, rapper/actor/activist T.I. (pictured hugging Tomika Miller) and his wife Tameka "Tiny" Harris.

Due to Covid-19, only 200 guests were allowed inside the sanctuary, which was marked for social distancing.

Singers Kelly Price, Yolanda Adams, Pastor Smokie Norful, actress/singer Tamela Mann, Kurt Carr all provided songs of comfort.

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Rev. Bernice King, daughter of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., addressed the crowd saying, "Having a father killed when I was only 5 years of age, my heart deeply grieves for [his daughters] Dream, Memory, Blessing and [stepson] Mekai. I know the pain of growing up without a father and the ongoing attention around his tragic loss. I am and will continue to pray for each of you."

During the eulogy, Rev. Warnock reflected on the time he’s spent with Brooks' family in the past few days. "I met 8- year-old Blessing, such a sweet and precious child," he told the congregation.

"On the same day her father was killed, they had been celebrating her 8th birthday. What do you do with that when you're 8-years-old?  These precious children of God will need the village to surround them and support them and embrace them and love on them and reassure them that they are not alone."

Today's service can be viewed on the church's website, www.EbenezerATL.org.

Source: Press release

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Instagram.com

Bubba Wallace's girlfriend, Amanda Carter, wrote an Instagram post thanking NASCAR fans for their support after a "noose" was found in Wallace's garage bay at Talladega on Sunday.

Carter also urged white people - including herself - to examine their prejudices.

"We must continue the conversation, no one is exempt from taking a look at themselves," wrote Carter, who has dated Wallace for 2 years. "The fact I date a black man does not exempt me."

Carter's post included the hashtag #blacklivesmatter.

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The "noose" turned out to be a garage door pull-down rope that can be seen in photos and videos of the same garage #4 as far back as 2017 (see video below).

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The same pull-down rope is seen in this video image from Nov. 2019. The loop at the end of the rope at garage bay #4 - the garage assigned to Wallace's team -- shows the loop is cut off and the rope is shorter than it was in 2019.

The video tour below of the Talladega garage shows ropes with hand loops hanging at every garage door.

Even though bloggers have provided incontrovertible proof that similar ropes with loops on the end are hanging at all NASCAR garage doors, Wallace and NASCAR officials continue to insist Wallace is the victim of racism.

In an appearance on The View on Tuesday, Wallace, who is the only Black or biracial driver in NASCAR, confirmed he spoke with the FBI about the alleged hate crime.

He called doubters who believe the noose story is a PR stunt "simple-minded people" who are "afraid of change, they use everything in their power to defend what they stand up for... instead of trying to listen and understand what's going on."
 

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Bill Cosby won the right to appeal his 2018 sexual assault conviction on the grounds that the comedian didn't receive a fair trial.

It isn't clear if Cosby will be freed on bond while his case is on appeal.

The 82-year-old is currently serving a 3 to 10-year sentence after a jury found him guilty of drugging and assaulting Andrea Constand during a second trial in 2004. The jury in the first case deadlocked.

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court will review whether prosecutors were allowed to call five additional female accusers to testify against Cosby. And whether evidence was introduced that Cosby gave women quaaludes in the past.

According to Page Six, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court will also examine whether a prosecutor told Cosby he would never face criminal charges in Constand's case after she accepted a large settlement payment from him.

Cosby's previous request to be released from prison due to the coronavirus pandemic was denied.

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Shaun King says statues of "white" Jesus Christ should be torn down. He made his remarks as Black Lives Matter protesters have torn down statues of past presidents and Confederate generals.

The transracial Caucasian activist, who claims to be a Black man, says historians believe Jesus likely had the appearance of people who typically lived in the Middle East rather than the white, bearded man depicted in the Holy Bible and other Christian literature.

"Yes, I think the statues of the white European they claim is Jesus should also come down. They are a form of white supremacy. Always have been."

He added: "In the Bible, when the family of Jesus wanted to hide, and blend in, guess where they went? EGYPT! Not Denmark. Tear them down."

He also said that stained glass windows and other images of a white Jesus, his white mother and "their white friends" should all be destroyed."

The backlash was swift. King complained that he'd received 20 death threats in a span of 12 hours.

Some Twitter users said King's comments are in keeping with the Democrats' goal to destroy traditional values, the church and family.

Others noted the irony in King's words, since he himself is a white man.

Twitter user @CharriseLane tweeted:

"Shaun King is trying to take down White Jesus statues while knowing that he himself is White.

Sit your White behind down and mind your business Shaun."

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A racist employee at a restaurant was shamed by Tameka "Tiny" Harris for discriminating against a Black boy for wearing a t-shirt and shorts.

In a video re-posted by Tameka, a white restaurant employee tells a Black woman she can't eat in the establishment because her minor son is not in compliance with the dress code.

The woman points out a white boy - about the same age as her son - who is also wearing a t-shirt and shorts with white sneakers.

The employee says tennis shoes are allowed but not an athletic shirt or shorts.

"Are you telling me the little boy who just ate here does not have on an athletic shirt?" the woman asks the employee.

The employee responds, "I'm sorry, I would love for you to come back and eat here."

Tameka captioned the video: "A bunch of B.S period!! Really [middle finger icon] this restaurant!!"
 

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Really ?? this restaurant ???

A post shared by Majorgirl (@majorgirl) on

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There's a reason why NASCAR didn't provide any photos or videos of the "noose" found hanging in Bubba Wallace's garage at Talladega on Sunday.

Wallace, a 26-year-old, clean-cut, biracial driver from Alabama, was reportedly targeted by a racist who objected to his demand that all Confederate flags be banned from NASCAR events.

As a driver, Wallace has not won a race in 220 attempts. But his Black Lives Matter activism thrust him into the headlines.

On Monday, it was announced that a noose was found hanging in Wallace's garage at Talladega Superspeedway in Alabama on Sunday.

LeBron James and Formula 1 driver Lewis Hamilton were among those expressing their outrage.

The "noose" turned out to be a garage door pull-down rope. All NASCAR garage doors have them.

Many are asking why NASCAR made the announcement before doing any investigating.

Look no further than the empty stands for the answer.

The stands have been empty for years -- ever since NASCAR changed its own rules to make every stock car driver equal.

At Monday's Talladega race, there were more drivers and crew members than people in the stands. NASCAR reportedly paints the seats multi colors to simulate fans in the stands at every race (see below).

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The auto racing company lost big money sponsors as a result of the lack of fan support.

When Wallace painted his car with the Black Lives Matter insignia at a racing event last month, his car was unsponsored.

Wallace lost his only sponsor -- Blue-Emu muscle pain cream -- when he threw a "rage-quitting" tantrum midstream during an eNASCAR virtual iRacing series in April.

"That's it. That's why I don't take this shit serious," Wallace said before disconnecting in anger.

Afterwards, Wallace took to Twitter to laugh at the fan backlash to his rage-quitting.

That's when sponsor Blue-Emu tweeted, "[Good to know] where you stand. Bye bye Bubba. We're interested in drivers, not quitters."

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The Internet is comparing NASCAR driver Bubba Wallace to disgraced actor Jussie Smollett.

Smollett, 38, is best known for allegedly orchestrating a hate crime hoax against himself in Chicago in 2019.

The FBI is investigating a racist incident in Wallace's team garage at Talladega. A noose was found hanging in the stall at Talladega Superspeedway in Talladega, Alabama on Sunday.

The noose was observed by a Wallace team member who works on his cars. Wallace reportedly did not see the noose.

A plethora of surveillance cameras monitor the NASCAR garage where millions of dollars worth of race cars and expensive tools are kept.

NASCAR drivers are not allowed to enter the garage before races. They must go directly from their trailers to their cars before the start of the race.

But that didn't stop rumormongers on the internet from accusing the 26-year-old Alabama native of making up the noose story.

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Wallace is the only full-time Black or biracial driver in NASCAR's elite Cup Series. He drives for team owner and NASCAR Hall of Famer Richard Petty.

Petty supported Wallace at the track on Monday. Petty, 82, hasn't been seen at a NASCAR race since before the coronavirus pandemic.

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Drivers joined together to push Wallace's #43 Victory Junction Chevrolet along pit road to the front of the the Geico 500 field before the start of the race on Monday.

NASCAR also painted "#IStandwith Bubba" on the infield at the Talladega Superspeedway.

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Minneapolis PD

Eight Black Minnesota corrections officers filed a racial discrimination lawsuit for allegedly being barred from guarding Derek Chauvin at the detention center where they work.

The eight non-white guards filed the lawsuit against the Ramsey County Adult Detention Center for allegedly providing only white corrections officers to guard Chauvin.

Chauvin, 44, has been held at the detention center since May 29 on charges of felony murder in the death of George Floyd in south Minneapolis on May 25.

The corrections officers said Superintendent Steve Lydon ordered all non-white officers and the Black officers were told to avoid contact with Chauvin.

In the discrimination lawsuit, Lydon allegedly said the officers' race made them a potential "liability" if anything were to happen to Chauvin after he arrived at the facility.

"I understood that the decision to segregate us had been made because we could not be trusted to carry out our work responsibilities professionally around the high-profile inmate — solely because of the color of our skin," said the acting sergeant, who is Black.

He added: "I am not aware of a similar situation where white officers were segregated from an inmate."