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Kenosha County Jail

A judge in Kenosha, Wisconsin denied prosecutors' requests to raise Kyle Rittenhouse's bail or issue an arrest warrant for the teenager who killed 2 people during anti-police protests last summer.

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Rittenhouse, then 17, was armed with a friend's AR-15 semi-automatic rifle when he traveled to Kenosha during the protests and riots following the police shooting of Jacob Blake.

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Rittenhouse (pictured center) was charged with first-degree intentional homicide in the shooting death of Anthony Huber, 26 (pictured right), first-degree reckless homicide in the death of Joseph Rosenbaum (not pictured), and attempted first-degree intentional homicide for wounding Gaige Grosskreutz ([pictured left), who was armed with a handgun.

Rittenhouse maintains he shot the three Antifa protesters in self-defense because they were armed with weapons when they attacked him.

Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

A protester who kicked Rittenhouse in the head was not shot because he was unarmed.

Rittenhouse is accused of violating the terms of his $2 million cash bond after he failed to update his new address when he moved out of his mother's Antioch, Illinois apartment.

Prosecutors had asked Kenosha County Circuit Court Judge Bruce Schroeder to raise Rittenhouse's bond by $200,000 cash, and issue a warrant for his arrest. But the judge declined both requests.

The terms of Rittenhouse's cash bail require him to update his new address within 48 hours of moving.

In an unusual decision, the judge sealed Rittenhouse's current address and refused to provide it to the Kenosha County District Attorney’s Office.

The district attorney previously refused to keep Rittenhouse's address a secret.

Rittenhouse moved to a "safe house" after receiving death threats.

Twitter users expressed outrage at the judge's decision.

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Tessica Brown, the Louisiana woman known as "Gorilla Glue Girl", was emotional as she arrived in Los Angeles, California for an intensive procedure to remove superglue from her scalp after she replaced the sticky substance with her usual spritz spray.

The 40-year-old daycare owner wore a red hoodie which she pulled down over her face mask as the paparazzi snapped photos. She was accompanied by two friends who gave her emotional support.

Brown declined to answer questions from the paparazzi when asked if reps from Got 2B Glued or Gorilla Glue reached out to her.

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As TMZ first reported, Brown accepted an offer from Beverly Hills plastic surgeon Dr. Michael Obeng to perform the 4-hour, $12,500 procedure for free.

Brown was placed under a light anesthesia during the procedure. After the procedure was over, she immediately reached for her hair to see if she had any left. She was emotional once she realized she could once again run her fingers through her hair -- although there wasn't much hair left to run her fingers through.

Dr. Obeng said used a solvent to break down the polyurethane -- the main ingredient in Gorilla Glue.

Brown said she was prepared to wear wigs and weave products for the rest of her life until she had the procedure done.

Brown went viral last week when she shared a video explaining how she replaced her usual spritz holding spray with Gorilla Glue spray because the label didn't say she couldn't spray the glue on her hair.

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In an interview with Entertainment Tonight, Brown said she's "over it" after her Instagram followers questioned whether her glue mixup was a stunt.

"The reason I went to the internet because I was never going to take this to social media [but] the reason I took it to social media was because I didn't know what else to do," she explained. "I knew somebody out there, somebody, could have told me something. I didn't think for one second it was going to be everywhere."

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When asked how she's dealing with public scrutiny that she made up the story about spraying glue in her hair, Brown denied it was a publicity stunt.

"Again, it never was -- who in they right mind would have just said, 'Oh, let me just spray this on my head and I'm going to become famous overnight?' Never. Who would want that?"
 

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A historic Krispy Kreme in Atlanta, Georgia, owned by NBA legend Shaquille O'Neal, was heavily damaged by fire early Wednesday.

Atlanta fire crews responded to reports of a fire at the location shortly after midnight. When fire crews arrived, the historic structure was fully engulfed in flames, ESPN reported.

The fire reportedly started in the rear of the building. Video posted on social media shows roaring flames. No injuries were reported.

O'Neal bought the store in 2016. Originally built in 1965, the Krispy Kreme fed mourners after Martin Luther King Jr.'s funeral in 1968 by donating 150 dozen doughnuts to Atlanta churches.

"I hope no one was hurt and we will bounce back better than ever," the Basketball Hall of Famer told WXIA-TV.

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YouTube

The woman who went viral after spraying Gorilla Glue in her hair will meet with a plastic surgeon in the hopes of saving her hair.

Tessica Brown received a generous offer from Beverly Hills plastic surgeon Dr. Michael Obeng, who says he can save her hair in a lengthy procedure.

Brown will fly Wednesday to Louisiana -- an all expenses paid trip -- to have the procedure done, TMZ reports.

Dr. Obeng estimates it will take 2 or 3 days to completely eliminate the superglue from her scalp.

Brown went viral after she published a TikTok video complaining that her hair was stiff as a board after using Gorilla Glue adhesive spray as holding hairspray.

Sources tell TMZ that Brown spent 22 hours in the emergency room at St. Bernard Parish Hospital, in Chalmette, Louisiana, where staff used acetone, the ingredient in nail polish remover, in a failed attempt to remove the superglue.

Dr. Obeng tells TMZ he feels sorry for Tessica, and he's performing the expensive procedure free of charge. The estimated cost for the procedure is $12,500.

Brown also met with an attorney to discuss her legal options against the Gorilla Glue manufacturer.

Gorilla Glue issued a statement after Brown's story went viral.

"We are very sorry to hear about the unfortunate incident that Miss Brown experienced using our Spray Adhesive on her hair. We are glad to see in her recent video that Miss Brown has received medical treatment from her local medical facility and wish her the best."

A GofundMe account raised $14,352 of a $1,500 goal to pay for wigs and hair weave products until her hair grows back.

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YouTube

A Louisiana woman who sprayed Gorilla Glue in her hair is suing the maker of Gorilla Glue after emergency room staff were unable to remove the hardened adhesive.

Tessica Brown went viral after she published a TikTok video complaining that her hair was stiff as a board after using Gorilla Glue adhesive spray as holding hairspray.

Sources tell TMZ that Brown spent 22 hours in the emergency room at St. Bernard Parish Hospital, in Chalmette, Louisiana, where staff used acetone, the ingredient in nail polish remover, in a failed attempt to remove the superglue.

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YouTube, Instagram

The source said the acetone burned her scalp and softened the glue to a sticky and gooey consistency before it hardened right back up again. She lost quite a bit of hair during the procedure.

Brown was given nail polish remover pads and a bottle of sterile water to take home. She was told to keep trying to remove the glue at home.

All other remedies failed to remove the glue -- and now Brown is in danger of going bald.

The source tells TMZ Brown retained a lawyer to discuss her options and to determine if she has a legal case against Gorilla Glue.

The product label warns against using the superglue in eyes, on skin (including the scalp) or clothing.

But Brown claims the label was "misleading" and didn't specifically state that the spray can't be used on hair.

Brown claims she thought the spray would be safe to use on her hair because the label said "multi-use."

A GofundMe page raised $9,000 for hair weave products and wigs for Brown who will probably lose all of her hair.
 

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YouTube

A Tennessee YouTuber was shot and killed while filming a "prank" video that went horribly wrong.

According to Nashville police, Timothy Wilks, 20, was shot and killed when he approached a group of people in the parking lot of Urban Air indoor trampoline park on Friday.

When officers arrived at the scene, David Starnes Jr., 23, told them he shot Wilks in self-defense because Wilks was armed with a butcher knife.

A friend who was with Wilks told police they were filming a "prank" robbery video for their YouTube channel, the New York Post reported.

According to witnesses, Wilks and his friend ran at them while wielding butcher knives. They said Starnes shot Wilks to defend himself and his friends.

Police said an investigation is ongoing and no charges have been filed.

A lawyer told WZTV, "I'm sure the people involved would like to characterize this as a prank. But it certainly seems to be a prank that went seriously awry." The lawyer said Wilks' friend could potentially face charges.

Popular YouTube pranksters typically stage prank videos with willing participants to avoid liability if something goes wrong.

According to YouTube policies, YouTune does not allow creators to post content "that encourages dangerous or illegal pranks" that can lead people to fear for their safety or "cause serious physical harm or death."

Stock photo: Getty Images

A Utah charter school is catching heat for allowing Caucasian parents to opt their children out of Black History Month lessons. February is Black History Month in America.

Maria Montessori Academy Director Micah Hirokawa issued a statement, saying he "reluctantly" sent a letter to parents informing them that they are able "to exercise their civil rights to not participate in Black History Month at the school."

Hirokawa expressed disappointment in the parents’ decision not to participate in lessons related to Black history, saying, "We should not shield our children from the history of our Nation, the mistreatment of its African American citizens, and the bravery of civil rights leaders, but should educate them about it." It was noted that of the 322 students who are enrolled at the school, only three students are Black.

By comparison, parents who object to schools teaching their children gender equality and LGBT+ classes are not able to opt their children out of the classes due to former President Barack Obama's executive orders that made the classes part of the mandatory health curriculum in public schools.

Since facing public backlash, the Utah school has reportedly reversed its decision, saying parents can no longer opt their children out of Black History Month lessons.

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YouTube

A Louisiana woman who went viral after using Gorilla Glue spray in her hair sought treatment in an emergency room over the weekend.

Tessica Brown went viral after she published a TikTok video complaining that her hair wouldn't move after using Gorilla Glue adhesive spray as holding hairspray.

Gorilla Glue is an ultra strong superglue product meant for bonding various nonporous materials such as metal and steel.

"My hair has been like this for about a month now. It's not by choice. Noooo," she said, before explaining that she used Gorilla Glue spray after she ran out of her holding spray.

"Y'all, look: My hair, it don't move. You hear what I'm telling you? It. Don't. Move. I've washed my hair 15 times and it don't move!"

On Saturday, Brown posted photos of herself in the emergency room at St. Bernard Parish Hospital, in Chalmette, Louisiana.

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YouTube, Instagram

The ER doctor gave her packets of nail polish remover pads and a bottle of sterile water. She captioned a photo of the medical supplies: "This is really about to be a long process."

Her decision to seek treatment came after the maker of Gorilla Glue offered advice.

The company told TMZ that Brown could use rubbing alcohol on her head — but warned that if it had actually been in place for a month, her hair was "likely fractured at the root," meaning she will go bald.

Don't try this at home kids.

Watch the original video below.
 

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Facebook

Rev. Drene Keyes, of Virginia, was anxious about receiving her first dose of the still experimental Pfizer mRNA Covid-19 vaccine. So anxious that she asked a co-worker to go with her to the vaccination site.

The 58-year-old, "gifted grandmother of six" was in the high-risk category for Covid-19 with multiple preexisting conditions including diabetes, morbid obesity, high cholesterol, high blood pressure and sleep apnea.

Keyes' daughter, Lisa Jones, told WKTR her mom's job "made her eligible for the vaccine."

Keyes believed the vaccine would lessen her symptoms if she contracted the coronavirus.

Before she left home, Jones helped her put on her shoes.

"She was such a loving and generous person," Jones said.

A co-worker accompanied Keyes to a medical facility in Warsaw, where she got the injection on Saturday. Keyes waited the mandatory 15-minute observation period before heading to her car in the parking lot.

Her co-worker said she was getting into her car when she suddenly said, "Something is not right. Something's not right."

Keyes had difficulty breathing and began vomiting. She was rushed to VCU Tappahannock Hospital, where doctors administered Epipen (epinephrine for anaphylaxis), CPR and oxygen.

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Facebook

"They tried to remove fluid from her lungs. They called it 'flash pulmonary edema,' and doctors told me that it can be caused by anaphylaxis," said Jones (pictured right). "The doctor told me that often during anaphylaxis, chemicals are released inside of a person's body and can cause this to happen."

Anaphylaxis is a severe, life-threatening allergic reaction that can occur within seconds or minutes after exposure to a substance the person is allergic to.

People who suffer an anaphylactic reaction should receive an epinephrine injection immediately to counteract the allergen.

Signs and symptoms of an anaphylactic reaction include itchy rash, swelling of the tongue and throat, difficulty swallowing, difficulty inhaling, shortness of breath and light headedness.

The onset of symptoms can occur within seconds or minutes.

Health officials previously cautioned people not to take the mRNA vaccine if they had a severe allergic reaction in the past.

The risks -- including death -- were spelled out in the documents that Keyes signed before she got the vaccine.

Still, Jones is demanding answers. She believes more testing should have been done before the vaccines were rushed to market for a virus with a 99.4% survival rate.

"Why are we allowing people with underlying conditions to be guinea pigs for a vaccine that is still in clinical trials and emergency use?" Jones questioned.

Jones told WTVR she hopes her mother's death serves as a warning to doctors and health professionals to pre-screen patients prior to administering the vaccine.

"My mom was wanting to protect herself, and it did not turn out that way," Jones told WBRZ.

Health officials insist Keyes did not die from anaphylaxis or a reaction to the vaccine -- despite ER doctors treating her for anaphylaxis.

The CDC is also investigating the deaths of a 56-year-old Florida doctor about two weeks after getting his first Pfizer vaccine, and a 60-year-old California healthcare worker who died four days after his second injection with the Pfizer vaccine.

"Drene Keyes believed mainstream media, government health officials, her doctors and Big Pharma that Pfizer's vaccine was safe and it would protect her," said Robert F. Kennedy, Jr.

"Her faith and trust in those people and institutions may have cost her her life."

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YouTube

An outspoken emergency room doctor with a large following on social media made headlines when he wished death on Americans who choose to live their lives without fear.

On Feb. 3, Dr. Gilman reacted to a viral video that shows maskless shoppers in a Florida grocery store.

In a now-deleted tweet, Gilman wrote: "Naples, Florida. Let 'em die. I'm so tired of these people. No vaccine for y'all."

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In a follow-up tweet, he wrote: "I'm working in the COVID ICU tonight! I'm so tired of giving 200% while others in the U.S. can’t even help by simply wearing a mask!"

When outraged Twitter followers reminded him that his impulsiveness got him fired from a hospital in Arizona, he blamed Republicans and walked back his statement.

"Republicans trying to take my words out of context as if I deny medical care to people that don't wear masks & 'let 'em die. My point is that we can't waste our energy on these COVID deniers. [They] are not gonna protect themselves so let 'em die. They'll find out the hard way."

On Nov. 22, Dr. Gilman was fired for lying about the lack of ICU beds in the state of Arizona.

Gilman tweeted that there were "no more ICU beds in the state of Arizona."

But Gov. Doug Ducey and the Department of Health disputed his tweet by confirming there were over 100 ICU beds available in the state that same day.

Gilman's tweets made him a celebrity on Twitter. He received a Zoom call from Joe Biden's transition team and Oprah Winfrey offered to send him and his family on vacation.

But others were not as tolerant of Gilman's attention-seeking tweets.

Envision, the agency that contracts him to work temporary assignments in hospitals, told him his services were no longer needed at Yuma Medical Center in Arizona.

When Gilman tweeted that he was "fired" from his temporary assignment, the hospital said it was all a "misunderstanding" and that he still worked shifts there.

But Gilman told a reporter that he was on the schedule to work but he had not been permitted to work his scheduled shifts.

"I was told by Envision that the hospital was not allowing me to return back due to a tweet," he said.

The hospital quietly told Envision that Gilman would not be allowed to "be vocal or outspoken" on social media.

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Social media users lashed out at Gilman for his insensitive tweet about the maskless grocery store in Florida.

One Twitter user called Gilman "mentally unfit", while others expressed their support for him.

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Dr. Gilman attempted to go viral with a rap song about Covid-19 last year, but it flopped.