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A 911 dispatcher was so concerned after watching a live feed of George Floyd's arrest on May 25, that she called a sergeant to express her concerns.

The phone call came to light in a newly released transcript from the Minneapolis Police Department, according to Fox5DC.

In the phone call between the dispatcher and a police sergeant, the woman said she watched the arrest on live camera feed outside Cup Foods in south Minneapolis.

"You can call me a snitch if you want to," she said, before adding she saw three officers physically restrain Floyd who was already handcuffed on the ground.

"All of them sat on this man. I don't know if they needed to or not. They haven't said anything to me yet," the dispatcher added.

The sergeant said he would look into the problem, before the call with the dispatcher ended.

The transcript also included two calls from pedestrians who witnessed the murder. Both calls were placed at 8:32 p.m.

In the first call, the bystander said he watched as an officer, "just pretty much killed this guy that wasn't resisting arrest. He had his knee on the dude's neck the whole time."

The caller asked to speak with a supervisor and was in the middle of being connected when the call abruptly ended.

A second call placed about 30 seconds later was also disconnected before the caller could speak with a supervisor about the incident.

Kyle Plush

A Cincinnati 911 operator was suspended after mishandling an emergency call from a terrified 16-year-old high school student who was crushed to death when his minivan seat fell on him.

Kyle Plush died inside his family's minivan in a parking lot of his private school in Madisonville, Ohio on Tuesday.

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Tamir Rice

A 12-year-old Cleveland boy died one day after he was shot by a police officer who responded to a call about a boy pointing a gun at a playground. The man who called 911 told the dispatcher that the gun was "probably fake" and it was scaring everyone. But the dispatcher did not pass that information on to responding officers.

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Pittsburgh Cops Respond to 27 Urgent 911 Calls from the Same Residence

Pittsburgh police have a mystery on their hands. Over the last five weeks, cops have responded to 27 urgent 911 calls they say appear to be coming from inside the home of A.J. Richardson, a former candidate for the mayor of Pittsburgh.

Richardson insists the calls aren't coming from his house, according to CBS affiliate KDKA2. By law the police can not ignore the 911 calls. A constant police presence outside the home at 3056 Bergman St. has become a normal occurrence to Richardson's neighbors.

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Pima County 911 call

A Tucson, Arizona man wants action taken against a Pima County 911 dispatcher who laughed when he told her his car and girlfriend were on fire.

Lalo Delgado's car caught on fire during a freak accident on the way to Chiva Falls, Breitbart.com reports.

Delgado told KGUN9-TV he was "shocked" when he called 911 to report the fire, and the dispatcher giggled.

"Her initial reaction was laugh and giggle in the background," said Delgado. "It was very disturbing."

Video auto-plays after the break.

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Gina DeJesus Amanda Berry Michelle knight

The Cleveland 911 dispatcher who took kidnap victim Amanda Berry's call on Monday evening may lose his/her job for the callous way the call was handled.

The unidentified dispatcher was cold and lacked empathy when Berry dialed 911 to report she had been kidnapped and held in a basement for 10 years by former Cleveland school bus driver Ariel Castro, 52.

Audio of the 911 call angered many Cleveland residents who demanded to know why the unsympathetic "call taker" didn't keep Berry on the phone until police arrived.

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