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Joe Biden says his 1994 crime bill that decimated the Black community was "a mistake."

Biden made the remark during his town hall event with ABC News on Thursday night.

When asked by ABC News' George Stephanopoulos if the bill was a mistake, Biden replied, "Yes, it was. But here's where the mistake came. The mistake came in terms of what the states did locally."

Biden said the bill was created in response to a spike in crime in the inner cities in the late 1980s and early 1990s.

A member of Biden's campaign later took to Twitter to clarify that Biden was referring to the 1986 crime bill, not the controversial 1994 crime bill.

Biden wrote both bills.

The 1986 bill, which Biden also authored, toughened the sentences for possession of rock cocaine, aka "crack", while lessening sentences for people who used powder cocaine.

As Fox News pointed out on Friday, the 1994 crime bill incentivized states to "fill up prisons" in exchange for federal cash in state coffers.

Biden, 77, claims he was tougher on crack users because he was told crack cocaine was worse than powder cocaine.

"We were told by the experts that '[with] crack, you can never go back.' It was somehow fundamentally different. It's not different. It's trapped an entire generation."

A young Black male who participated in the town hall told the presidential candidate that Black males will be sitting at home on Election Day.

A recent poll shows President Trump's support among Black males increased to 45% from just 8% in 2016.