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Boosie Badazz's manager has denied reports that the Louisiana rapper is undergoing surgery to amputate one of his feet after he was shot in the lower leg in Dallas, Texas.

Boosie's manager took to Instagram on Thursday to deny reports by posting a screenshot of a blog headline with the words: "Fake News"

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A gunshot wound to the leg usually doesn't require a week in the hospital -- unless there are serious complications such as blood clots, pulmonary emboli, or diminished tissue perfusion causing tissue death.

Boosie, 38, has a history of type 1 diabetes which requires daily insulin injections to maintain normal blood sugar levels.

People who are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes are at higher risk for amputation because of a condition called peripheral artery disease, which narrows the arteries and lowers oxygenated blood perfusion to the arms and legs.

Another complication of a gunshot wound to the leg is pulmonary emboli caused by fragmented bone in the leg traveling through the veins to the lungs. A pulmonary embolism is potentially fatal.

Earlier this week Boosie posted an update to his Instagram assuring fans that he was well.

"I'm good. Appreciate all the happy birthday wishes and get well soon wishes."
 

 

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Lil Boosie is reportedly scheduled to have one of his feet amputated due to massive blood loss after suffering a gunshot wound to the leg.

Boosie, real name Torrence Hatch Jr., was shot while sitting in a Sprinter van in a parking lot last week in Dallas, Texas.

The Louisiana rapper was in town to attend a memorial to his artist Mo3, 28, real name Melvin Noble, who was fatally shot by an unknown assailant on a Dallas freeway on Nov. 11.

Normally, a bullet wound to the leg is not a life-threatening condition. But if the bullet severed an artery in the leg the resulting blood loss can lead to tissue atrophy from lack of oxygen in the blood.

Boosie, 38, has a history of type 1 diabetes which requires daily insulin injections to maintain normal blood sugar levels.

People who are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes are at higher risk for amputation because of a condition called peripheral artery disease, which narrows the arteries and lowers oxygenated blood perfusion to the arms and legs.

Another complication of a gunshot wound to the leg is pulmonary emboli caused by fragmented bone in the leg traveling through the veins to the lungs. A pulmonary embolism is potentially fatal.