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A Wisconsin woman was arrested for taking the law into her own hands after she caught her ex-boyfriend with another woman.

Kelly S. Hayes, of Madison, is accused of smashing out the windows of a car owned by her ex-boyfriend, then pouring an accelerant inside the car and setting it on fire.

The arson incident happened on the South Side on Tuesday, police say. The crime of passion was caught on cellphone video and uploaded to Facebook.
 

Police and fire crews responded to an apartment complex on the 2000 block of Greenway Cross around 5 p.m. The car, a Chevy Impala, was already engulfed in flames by the time fire crews arrived to put out the blaze.

A witness told police that a woman armed with a baseball bat broke out the windows on the car before dousing the car with gas and setting it on fire.

Cell phone video shows a woman wearing a black hoodie, face mask and gloves setting the car on fire. A small explosion knocked the women to the ground before she grabbed a red gas can and ran off.

Another witness got the license plate number of the car the scorned woman drove off in. Police ran the license plate and linked it to Hayes, 34, who had a past relationship with the unidentified car owner, police say.

Hayes was arrested and charged with suspicion of arson and criminal damage to property. She showed no remorse for her crime in her smiling mugshot.

The car is a total loss, police said.

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Atlanta Fire Department

The reward for female arsonists who torched a Wendy's restaurant in Atlanta has been increased to $20,000.

The restaurant was destroyed, leaving about a dozen Wendy's employees jobless.

Atlanta fire officials released images from a surveillance video that shows a woman, who appears to be Caucasian, wearing a black miniskirt with a purple cardigan wrapped around her waist.

The same woman was caught on cellphone video pouring an accelerant inside the Wendy's restaurant where Rayshard Brooks was gunned down by a former Atlanta police officer on June 12.

Brooks, 27, died from 2 gunshot wounds to the back, according to the Fulton County Medical Examiner's Office.

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Atlanta Fire Department

Police are also searching for another Caucasian woman who was pictured holding a can of accelerant outside the Wendy's restaurant as it was fully engulfed in flames.

Caucasian firebugs have caused millions of dollars worth of damage to property during protests -- while blaming the property damage on Black Lives Matter protesters.
 

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Handout: Katie Alwood

The mother of a 9-year-old boy charged with starting a fire that killed 5 family members says he made a mistake, but he has a good heart.

28-year-old Katie Alwood told CBS News her son, Kyle Alwood, is not a monster.

"Everyone is looking at him like he's some kind of monster, but that's not who he is."

Alwood said her dead family members would want Kyle "to get the help he needs."

"People make mistakes, and that's what this is. Yes, it was a horrible tragedy, but it's still not something to throw his life away over."

Police say Kyle set fire to the family's mobile home while everyone was asleep on April 6. Alwood and Kyle were the only ones who managed to escape the blaze.

"I stood at the window and I told my kids I was sorry I couldn't save them. Mommy was right there, and I loved them. At least hopefully they heard that," she said.

"I don't know what's worse. Hearing them scream or hearing them stop."

Among the dead are Alwood's children, 2-year-old Daemon Wall and 1-year-old Ariel Wall; her niece, 2-year-old Rose Wall; her 69-year-old grandmother, Kathryn Murray; and her fiancé, 34-year-old Jason Wall.

The NY Daily News reports Kyle was arrested on Tuesday and charged with five counts of first-degree murder, two counts of arson and one count of aggravated arson.

Alwood says Kyle, who was recently diagnosed with a form of schizophrenia, ADHD, and bipolar disorder, "has a good heart."

She added that he helped her around the house and took care of the younger kids.

"He helped feed his brother and sister, helped teach them how to walk," she told The Chicago Tribune. "Yes, he should be punished, but he needs mental help, that's what he needs."

ALwood gave permission to media outlets to publish Kyle's photo and name.