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Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms declined an invite to attend today's City Council meeting to address Atlanta's violent crime.

Police are searching for a gunman who fired into a crowd outside a crowded Buckhead lounge early Sunday. A woman and two males were wounded during the shooting and transported to local hospitals.

"Recent events throughout the city have generated a steady stream of public discussion regarding the role and effectiveness of leadership in Atlanta," Council President Felicia Moore wrote in a letter obtained by the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

"It could be helpful to the Council and the public to receive updates relative to the implementation status of any resulting recommendations associated with these initiatives."

Bottoms responded to Moore's letter on New Year's Day, saying her administration will continue to update the City Council on the specific steps being taken to address the city's violent crime.

"I will continue to engage the public and City Council on the important matters of public safety," Bottoms wrote, while politely declining the invitation. "As always, my staff will be available during your City Council conference call meeting."

Bottoms also encouraged Moore and the City Council to conduct their meetings via Zoom, or similar platforms.

Moore's letter comes after 7-year-old Kennedy Maxie died days after she was shot in the head while riding in a car with her aunt and mother near Phipps Plaza in Atlanta's trendy Buckhead neighborhood.

The child's shooting death fueled calls for a private police force to patrol Buckhead. City Council members have pledged to donate money toward the private force.

Kennedy's killer, 24-year-old Daquan Reed, is still at large.

Photo: Bettmann Archive/Getty Images

Wayne Bertram Williams, the man convicted of killing two of 28 young Black males in the infamous Atlanta Child Murders, was denied parole by the Georgia Board of Pardons and Parole on Monday, Dec. 2.

Williams, 61, was sentenced to two life terms in prison with the possibility of parole in 1982. He continues to maintain his innocence despite the forensics evidence that placed some of the victims in his car and home.

Many believe Williams is a scapegoat who took the fall for the real killer(s) during the killing spree that terrorized Atlanta from 1979-1981.

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms is among the supporters who believe Williams is innocent. She announced last year that Atlanta city police and the Fulton County District Attorney's Office would re-examine the murder cases for new evidence.

Channel 2's Tony Thomas spoke to Williams' close allies who were "99 percent sure" he would be released on parole today.

"I don't see why anyone would want to hold a man in prison if there is still lingering doubts that he didn't do any of the things he's convicted of," said Dewayne Hendrix, leader of The Wayne Williams Freedom Project.

Williams will have to wait another 8 years before he can go before the parole board again.

In a letter dated last month but just released Monday, the state board cited the main reason for the denial was "insufficient amount of time served to date given the nature and circumstances of your offense(s)."

Wayne Williams was born on May 27, 1958, and raised in southwest Atlanta by his doting parents, Homer and Faye Williams. Both of his parents earned modest salaries as school teachers. They worked long hours and made sure their only child wanted for nothing.

Photo by H.C. Williams/Bettmann Archive/Getty

A young Williams is shown here sitting on his mother's lap in a photo taken by his photographer dad.

Williams was a bookish boy who tested at the genius level. As a teenager he constructed his own radio station at home and began frequenting Atlanta stations WIGO and WAOK.

He developed an interest in recording studio equipment and began to "audition" young boys in the neighborhood. He dreamed of becoming a pop music producer and manager.

Atlanta police say Williams handed out flyers to young boys, hoping to discover the next Jackson 5.

Some of the boys who auditioned for Williams ended up as victims of the Atlanta child serial murderer.