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Atlanta Fire Department

The reward for female arsonists who torched a Wendy's restaurant in Atlanta has been increased to $20,000.

The restaurant was destroyed, leaving about a dozen Wendy's employees jobless.

Atlanta fire officials released images from a surveillance video that shows a woman, who appears to be Caucasian, wearing a black miniskirt with a purple cardigan wrapped around her waist.

The same woman was caught on cellphone video pouring an accelerant inside the Wendy's restaurant where Rayshard Brooks was gunned down by a former Atlanta police officer on June 12.

Brooks, 27, died from 2 gunshot wounds to the back, according to the Fulton County Medical Examiner's Office.

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Atlanta Fire Department

Police are also searching for another Caucasian woman who was pictured holding a can of accelerant outside the Wendy's restaurant as it was fully engulfed in flames.

Caucasian firebugs have caused millions of dollars worth of damage to property during protests -- while blaming the property damage on Black Lives Matter protesters.
 

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Getty Images, Facebook

Rayshard Brooks, the 27-year-old Black man who was shot by an Atlanta police officer, died from 2 gunshot wounds to the back, according to the Fulton County Medical Examiner's Office.

Brooks was gunned down in a Wendy's parking lot while fleeing from police late Friday night.

The incident began when police responded to a report that a man was asleep in a car in the Wendy's drive-thru lane. His car was blocking other cars in the drive-thru lane.

Police body cam video shows Brooks having a polite conversation with one of the officers. After failing a field sobriety test, he asked if he could park his car and walk to his sister's house a short distance away, but his request was denied.

Police attempted to cuff Brooks but he resisted and a struggle ensued between the three men.

Brooks was able to wrest a taser away from one of the cops and flee on foot. Surveillance video shows Brooks turning and pointing the taser at a pursuing officer who then fired three shots, killing Brooks.

The officer who fired his weapon was fired on Saturday after officials viewed the boy cam footage and determined the use of deadly force was not justifiable.

His partner was assigned to desk duty while the investigation into the officer-involved shooting continues.

Atlanta Police Chief Erika Shields resigned and her resignation was accepted by Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms on Saturday.

Protesters demonstrated peacefully outside the Wendy's restaurant on Saturday. But paid agitators in the crowd burned the restaurant to the ground overnight Sunday.

The Atlanta Police Dept. is offering a $10,000 reward for the capture of a Caucasian woman who allegedly set the blaze that torched the restaurant.

Fulton County District Attorney Paul Howard released a statement on Sunday:

"Today, members of my staff had the unfortunate duty of witnessing the autopsy of Mr. Brooks as part of our continued investigation.

Because this is a homicide investigation, there are several technical requirements that must be met before we are able to reach a decision. That includes the confirmation of the ballistics involved and obtaining a preliminary report from the Medical Examiner,” according to the DA’s statement."

So far, no arrests have been made in the murder of Mr. Brooks.
 

 

 

 

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Atlanta PD

Two former Atlanta police officers who were terminated for tasing a couple of college students have filed lawsuits against Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms and Atlanta Police Chief Erika Shields.

Mark Gardner and Ivory Streeter filed lawsuits through their attorney on Monday, alleging their rights were violated and they were fired in violation of the city's code; without investigation, proper notice or a pre-disciplinary hearing, according to ABC News.

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theGrio.com

Gardner and Streeter were caught on viral video dragging 20-year-old Taniyah Pilgrim and 22-year-old Messiah Young out of their car and tasing them during the Atlanta riots.

The police pursued the students as they were driving home from the George Floyd protests after a citywide curfew - but the students said they had no idea that a 9 p.m. curfew was in effect.

Gardner and Streeter were charged with aggravated assault for tasing the students when they committed no crimes.

The fired officers want their jobs reinstated, as well as back pay and benefits and an apology from the mayor.
 

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Facebook

Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin shows anger and a lack of remorse in his mugshot released hours after he was arrested and charged in George Floyd's death.

Floyd, 46, died Monday after Chauvin knelt on his neck for nearly 9 minutes following his an arrest for passing a counterfeit $20 bill at a grocery store.

Viral video showed Chauvin kneeling on Floyd's neck as he begged for air and bystanders pleaded with him to stop.

Chauvin, 44, was charged Friday with 3rd degree murder and manslaughter on day 4 of rioting and looting in south Minneapolis.

The charges carry a sentence of no more than 25 years or a fine of no more than $40,000, or both.

Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

Despite Chauvin's arrest, violent protests spread to cities in California, New York, Maryland, and Georgia.

Rioters destroyed CNN's headquarters in downtown Atlanta, breaking glass, throwing bottles and setting a police car on fire outside the building.

Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

Police in riot gear clashed with rioters inside the CNN building as protesters destroyed the interior.

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms angrily addressed the rioters at a press conference Friday night.

"You have defaced the CNN building. Ted Turner started CNN in Atlanta, 40 years ago because he believed in who we are as a city," she said. "If you care about this city, then go home!"

Protesters said the riots will continue until three other officers who were at the scene of Floyd's murder are arrested.

Rapper and entrepreneur Killer Mike rebuked CNN for inciting riots with their news coverage.

"I love CNN — but karma's a mother... Stop feeding fear & anger everyday," he said.

Johnny Nunez/WireImage

Former actress Maia Campbell was among 44 people arrested during a drag racing crackdown in Atlanta on Saturday.

Recently, Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms promised to allow drag racing on a designated block in the city. The sport has exploded in popularity in recent years.

But police say drag racing has become a problem since the coronavirus pandemic. And the mayor walked back her promise to allow illegal street racing.

Police issued 114 citations and impounded 29 vehicles. Four firearms were seized, including a semi-automatic rifle.

Campbell, 43, is best known for starring as Tiffany alongside LL Cool J in the hit TV sitcom "In the House."

Campbell battled drug addictions over the years. She supported herself financially by selling her body on street corners.

LL Cool J tried to reach out to his former co-star after she went viral while hustling for change at a gas station in 2017. But she replied, "Don't call me, I'll call you."

"You can't help someone who doesn't want your help," LL wrote on Twitter.

Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms reacted with disappointment to video and images showing crowds of people -- many without face masks -- celebrating Cinco de Mayo on Tuesday.

Hundreds of Atlanta residents watched the U.S. Navy's Blue Angels and U.S. Air Force's Thunderbirds perform an air show over Centennial Olympic Park in downtown Atlanta on Saturday, May 2.

In an interview on CNN's New Day, Mayor Bottoms said: "It was disappointing, and what was very clear was that people didn't get anything past the message that we were open up for business. They didn't get to the part that said that this is still a deadly virus and that you need to continue to socially distance and wear masks."

She added: "We're not out of the woods."

Bottoms and other Democrats say the state is reopening too soon.

The mayor warned that a "hotspot" in the northeastern part of the state is "rapidly" growing.

But her words fell on deaf ears.

Gov. Brian Kemp lifted Georgia's lockdown restriction on Friday, allowing clothing stores, hair salons and restaurants to reopen with strict guidelines in place.

Paras Griffin/Getty Images

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms lashed out at Black businesses that reopened after Gov. Brian Kemp lifted restrictions last week.

The mother of four criticized Kemp for lifting restrictions too soon and she urged residents, particularly Black people, to stay indoors and avoid patronizing hair and nail salons.

The mayor lashed out at people who stood in line at Greenbriar Mall in southwest Atlanta to buy a pair of Air Jordans at a Black-owned shoe store on Saturday.

On Monday, Bottoms tweeted:

"For those who crowded at Greenbriar awaiting the new Jordans, gathered at Piedmont Pk, shot fireworks at the Mall West End & even those now shopping at Lennox Square Mall, know that the only thing that’s changed about Covid-19 is your chance of catching."

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In an op-ed for Breitbart News, political commentator and writer Rob Smith questioned the motive behind Mayor Bottoms' fear mongering.

"Mayor Bottoms will tell you that coronavirus fears are behind her warnings, but Georgia’s COVID-19 numbers lag far behind the rest of the country in terms of infections and deaths," he wrote.

Smith compared Atlanta's Covid-19 deaths, about 1,250, to the death toll in New York state, over 19,000 deaths, and concluded that Mayor Bottoms is over exaggerating when she claims reopening Atlanta would be "deadly".

"Mayor Bottoms says that beginning the path to reopening Georgia is 'deadly.' Yet while it is true that African Americans are disproportionately affected by COVID-19, it is also true that the vast majority of hospitalizations and deaths from the coronavirus are among older Americans with pre-existing health conditions."

Smith suggests Mayor Bottoms is willing to sacrifice Black businesses to ensure the Democratic party's chances of winning in November.

He accused Bottoms of attacking the "African American voter base" with "misinformation and conspiracy theories," that are "counterproductive to keeping Atlanta's citizens healthy in every way, including economically."

"Telling a young and healthy small business owner to wait until his or her business is fully destroyed with no chance of coming back because the "science" says so is the kind of messaging that will continue to hurt American citizens of all colors. Moreover, business owners should be given the opportunity to make decisions about their own businesses."

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Twitter.com/@CharlieGileNBC

Some things are more important than buying essentials, such as food with a $1,200 stimulus check.

On the first day after the coronavirus lockdown was lifted in Georgia, an estimated 300 people lined up outside a shoe store in Atlanta to be the first to purchase a pair of Air Jordans.

Shoppers formed 2 lines outside the store in southwest Atlanta to buy the new Air Jordan 5 "Fire Red" sneakers. Some wore face masks, according to 11Alive News.

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Teenagers and adults stood patiently in line outside Jimmy Jazz's shoe store at Greenbriar Mall, according to NBC producer Charlie Gile.

"Here's what it looked like as Jimmy Jazz's doors opened at Greenbriar Mall in Atlanta. Everyone I talked to was in line for a new Air Jordan 5 that sold out online," Gile tweeted on Saturday.

Atlantans took advantage of the warm weather to sunbathe in parks and at Lake Lanier's man-made beach north of Atlanta. Others gathered at Piedmont Park in midtown to watch the famous U.S. Air Force Thunder Birds and Navy's Blue Angels put on an air show overhead.

Few people in the crowd complied with the coronavirus social distancing guidelines.

Gov. Brian Kemp, who lifted the lockdown restrictions on Friday, urged the crowds to maintain a safe distance.

"Stay at least six feet from other people, do not gather in groups, stay out of crowded places, and avoid mass gatherings," a press statement from Kemp's office said.

Photo by Linka A Odom/Getty Images

The line queued down the block outside one Atlanta barbershop on the first official day of Georgia's reopening.

Friday, April 24, was the first phase of Gov. Brian Kemp's plan to reopen Georgia. On Monday, Kemp announced that local establishments could reopen for business following a one month lockdown to prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

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Graphic: WSB-TV

Customers waited in line after 7 a.m. outside Peachtree Battle Barber Shop in Atlanta's upscale Buckhead neighborhood.

Matt Maddox was one of the customers waiting in line to get his hair cut amid the fear and uncertainty.

"I certainly don't want to spread it to anyone so I've got a mask, but I'm not really concerned," Maddox told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. "If you're cutting hair or you're a waiter, you haven't been working, so it helps get the economy started again."

At Studio 151 in Dallas, Georgia, the first appointment was at 6:20 a.m., according to the salon's owner.

Stephen Richardson's salon in Dallas, Ga, started losing business the week of March 10, according to the AJC.com. By March 26, he was ordered to shut his doors because he wasn't an essential business.

"I went from 100% to zero," Richardson told the AJC. He said he had to comply with a 14-page list of safety guidelines issued by the state. He added some of his own to keep his customers safe.

"We have our very own concerns, but we need our clients," he said. His protocols include one client at a time and temperature checks at the door.

By noon Friday, Richardson and another stylist were seeing a steady stream of clients.

"People are pretty much getting in and out," Richardson said. "I give the clients credit. Every client that has shown up has had a mask."

Barber shops and hair salons were grateful to do brisk business after a month of no revenue. But Some businesses were so devastated by the coronavirus lockdown that they will never recover.

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Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms angered residents who want the city reopened to stimulate the local economy.

The Mayor tweeted a text message from someone who called her a racial slur on Wednesday.

"With my daughter looking over my shoulder, I received this message on my phone."

The text message included the n-word and said, "just shut up and RE-OPEN ATLANTA."

The Mayor's supporters rushed to defend her. "I'm so sorry for this hatred and malevolence. But I'm grateful that your leadership is saving lives," one follower tweeted.

Bottoms defied Governor Brian Kemp who ordered some businesses in the state to reopen on Friday, April 24.

The governor's order will allow gyms, bowling alleys, hair salons and some other indoor facilities to resume operations by Friday if they comply with social distancing requirements.

Mayor Bottoms, who was caught off guard by Kemp's announcement, told MSNBC's "MTP Daily" on Tuesday that she is aware that her powers don't supersede Kemp's as governor.

"But I do have the power of my voice," the Democratic mayor said. "And I am using my voice to encourage people: Follow the data, look at the science, listen to the health care professionals and use your common sense."

Mayor Bottoms voiced her opposition to Gov. Kemp on numerous news programs including CNN, MSNBC, and radio shows.

During an interview with MSNBC's Chuck Todd, the Mayor criticized Kemp for reopening the state too soon.

Thanks to the Mayor's personal stylist, her hair was coiffed to perfection. But she had a message for less fortunate women who haven't seen the inside of a hair salon in over a month: "Stay home."

"We need to, as government leaders, step up and give people an incentive to stay home," Bottoms told Todd. "But there's nothing essential about going to a [hair salon] in the middle of a pandemic."

Kemp defended his decision to jumpstart the economy in Georgia and allow people to return to work.

"If people don't want to open the gym, they don't have to. But when you close somebody's business down and take their livelihoods ... I'm willing to give them the benefit of the doubt."
 

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Prominent Atlanta business owner Ryan Wilson slammed Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp for reopening the state on Friday, April 24.

The CEO and co-founder of Atlanta's thriving private membership club, The Gathering Spot, made a public PSA informing Gov. Kemp that the renown club will keep it's doors closed, despite Kemp's removal of the shelter-in-place order.

Like many other prominent business owners, mostly Democrats, Ryan expressed his "great concern" with the early opening of the state, saying regardless of what Kemp states, he will not put his staff or members in harm's way, while Georgia is still working to "flatten the Covid-19 curve."

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Photo: Instagram.com

Wilson, pictured at right with entrepreneur Killer Mike, states, "This is a complete failure of leadership. I don't understand the decision. We're not opening despite the order. We could technically open on April 27, but we're not going to because it's not safe to do so. The worst thing that could happen is we open our space up and someone gets sick or dies as a result of coming into contact with someone here. We just simply are not at the point where the data suggests that it’s a responsible move to make."

Wilson is calling on other local businesses to join him, by remaining closed, as well as urging citizens to stay at home.

He is also asking patrons to continue to support their small local businesses the best way they can throughout this troubling time. In the past 4-weeks of Georgia's closure, The Gathering Spot has donated over $16,000 in grants for small local businesses. They will continue to raise funding with their "We All We Got" fund, to continue to provide resources to local businesses in need.
 

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A message from the front desk of TGS #stayhome

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Singer/actress Janelle Monáe is helping to feed the hungry in Atlanta, Georgia by hosting a free food giveaway this weekend.

The "Tightrope" singer and her creative collective The Wondaland Arts Society have partnered with local officials and Hot 107.9 to organize the free lunch giveaway on Sunday, April 26 from 12-3 p.m.

In an announcement shared online, Monáe urged those in need during the ongoing coronavirus crisis to have a "#WONDALUNCH ON US!"

"Drive through and enjoy contact-free boxed lunches + more for you and your family on us!" the post reads. "This is a drive through and walk up food relief effort for the city of Atlanta and surrounding areas in response to covid-19."

"Rain or shine, everyone is welcome!" it adds.

The three-hour event will begin at 12pm EDT, but all families must pre-register, and early arrival is "highly advised".
 

Photo by Paras Griffin/Getty Images

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms reacted to the news that Georgia Governor Brian Kemp planned to reopen some businesses by this Friday.

The governor's order will allow gyms, bowling alleys, hair salons and some other indoor facilities to resume operations by Friday if they comply with social distancing requirements.

Mayor Bottoms was caught off guard by Kemp's announcement on Monday. She created an advisory council to reopen the city next month (May). But in a statement to WSB-TV, Bottoms expressed doubt that some businesses can reopen by Friday amid the coronavirus pandemic.

"I didn't know it was coming and obviously the governor is the governor and he certainly has the prerogative to make orders that he deems appropriate. He did not consult with me."

The mayor's hair was laid and her face was beat when she spoke to WSB-TV anchor Jovita Moore on Monday. But other women in Georgia haven't been to a hair salon in over a month.

"You get your hair done, I get my hair done. I don’t know how you socially distance when someone is doing your hair or doing your nails, giving you a massage," Bottoms said. "These things are concerning to me. I do hope that I'm wrong and the governor is right. Because if he's wrong, more people can die."

Many Democratic governors and mayors are resistant to reopening their states and cities even though the death toll from the virus is far below the predicted estimates.
 

Man in Gym Massaging Shoulders

Stock photo: Getty Images

For years, Black women have been quietly packing up and leaving Atlanta due to the decreasing numbers of available straight Black men here.

The situation is dire now that the coronavirus has changed the dating landscape and forced people to shelter inside.

Some men are choosing to shelter with their "homies" and former "college roommate" who really happen to be their undercover lovers.

Many Black women are venting their frustrations on social media where they complain about their men shacking up with other men instead of them.

One woman made a desperate plea to the gheys to stop "turning out" straight men in Atlanta.

Photo: Rick Davis / Splash News

The shortage of straight men in Atlanta has led to an excess of newly minted lesbians -- formerly straight ladies who jumped the fence out of necessity and a strong desire for intimacy.

Question: Ladies, do you live in Atlanta? Share your stories below.
 


 

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Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms says hospital intensive care units are "at capacity" during the coronavirus outbreak.

Georgia has confirmed 1,387 coronavirus cases and 7 deaths due to the virus.

Bottoms said intensive care units are struggling to find beds for the sickest patients, partly due to a water main break at Grady, the city's public hospital.

She confirmed Atlanta's hospitals aren't overrun by coronavirus patients, like hospitals in New York City.

"People have to understand that when we overrun our hospitals, people will still come in with heart attacks, people will still have car accidents," she told CBS 46.

"These things that happen every day on top of COVID-19 will make our health care system collapse in the same way you're seeing it in New York and you're seeing it happen across the globe."

Bottoms said hospitals in Atlanta are likely to be "near capacity" as the pandemic grows.

The CDC says people who have mild flu symptoms should avoid going to a hospital unless absolutely necessary.

The CDC offers the following tips to avoid spreading the flu or Covid-19 virus:

1. Wash your hands frequently for at least 20 seconds
2. Avoid touching your face with unwashed hands
3. Avoid close contact with sick people
4. Sneeze and cough into a tissue or your elbow
5. Stay home if you are sick
5. Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces
6. When in doubt consult with a healthcare professional