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A Baltimore activist has proposed a novel solution to the city's skyrocketing murder rate -- paying gang members not to kill each other.

"I can relate to the shooters, guess what they want? They want money," Tyree Moorehead told FOX 45 of Baltimore.

Moorehead speaks from a unique perspective: he spent more than a decade in prison on a second-degree murder conviction at age 15.

Moorehead said he speaks with gang members and he believes he knows what will motivate them to put down their weapons: money.

"I've talked to these people, I've seen the shooters, it's a small city, I know who the hustlers are," he said.

In 2020, Baltimore recorded over 300 homicides for the sixth year in a row, Fox News reported.

The crime rate continued to rise despite the city's lockdown measures to contain the coronavirus in 2020.

Former Baltimore Police spokesman T.J. Smith said he doesn't believe paying criminals more money than the city pays police officers will have an effect on the crime rate.

He said more money in the hands of criminals would only make it easier for them to acquire firearms.

"It could make it easier for people to get their hands on guns because they now have an influx of a different level of cash," Smith told FOX 45.

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A Baltimore man is lucky to be alive after he was shot by the boyfriend of a woman he punched at a Baltimore County gas station.

The incident occurred at Exxon gas station near Honeygo Boulevard and the White Marsh Mall on Wednesday, July 29.

Witnesses say the gunman was trying to cut the line inside the gas station when the victim stepped out of the line and followed him out of the store.

Daijuan Jett was in the same line when he observed the confrontation outside the store.

"He was trying to cut in front of everyone in the line, and the victim, [who] was shot at -- he was telling the guy that was cutting in front of everyone to get behind everyone," Jett told WMAR2 News.

The victim followed the suspect out of the store to a silver car driven being driven by a woman.

"He opened the driver's door and let the man know... the guy that was in the car, the suspect, he grabbed a gun and just fired about five or six shots," said Jett.

Surveillance video from the Exxon station shows the victim open the car door and punch the female driver before he was shot by someone in the vehicle.

The victim was taken to a local hospital for treatment of multiple gunshot wounds. His condition is unknown.

The Baltimore County Department's Violent Crime Unit asks anyone who has information on the shooting to call 410-307-2020.
 

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Frustrated employers can't get their employees to return to work because they earn more from unemployment benefits.

A Baltimore restaurant owner can't get her workers to return to work because they can collect up to $1030 a week on unemployment until the end of July.

Melony Wagner said Tuesday that she can't get her employee to return to work at Charles Village Pub, because they prefer to collect unemployment benefits which pays more.

Other states are experiencing employee retention problems because the state and feds pay more than they earn at work.

In Georgia, home improvement stores Home Depot and Lowes posted large "Help wanted" signs outside their Duluth locations after their employees quit to apply for unemployment.

According to a report by FOX 5 News, Maryland residents can claim a maximum of $430 a week from the state plus an additional $600 a week from the federal government under the CARES Act enacted in March 2020.

"It's a very difficult position to be put in right now, honestly," Wagner told FOX 5 News. "Although I know everybody loves the extra $600 a week, it's really had the opposite effect of what I think they were hoping it was going to have."

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Rev. Al Sharpton (D) and former Maryland lieutenant governor Michael Steele (R) addressed comments made by President Donald Trump who attacked Baltimore Congressman Elijah Cummings as a "bully" and the city of Baltimore as crime and rat-infested.

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