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A Detroit man is suing a bank for calling the police when he went to deposit settlement checks from a race discrimination lawsuit.

Sauntore Thomas, 44, alleges TCF Bank accused him of check fraud because the bank couldn't verify checks he tried to deposit as part of his lawsuit settlement.

Thomas, who is Black, received an undisclosed amount from Enterprise Rent a Car to settle a May 2018 lawsuit.

He filed a lawsuit on Wednesday after what he calls a "hellish experience" being questioned by police in front of bank customers - while two more Detroit police officers guarded the door outside, the Detroit Free Press reported.

Thomas is seeking unspecified damages and an apology from TCF Bank. The bank claims it was only following protocol when there is a large deposit made.

The bank filed a police report alleging Thomas committed bank fraud. TCF Bank claims the watermark on the checks indicated the checks were fraudulent.

Thomas wasn't arrested and no charges were filed, the NY Daily News reported.

A spokesperson from the Livonia Police Department told the Free Press that the checks could not be verified because they weren't payroll checks.

An emailed copy of the settled lawsuit from Thomas' attorney, Deborah Gordon, didn't resolve the dispute, nor did conversations with Gordon, the cops and bank personnel.

"Obviously, assumptions were made the minute he walked in based on his race," attorney Gordon told the Free Press.

"It's unbelievable that this guy got done with a race discrimination case and he's not allowed to deposit the checks based on his case? It's absolutely outrageous."

Gordon, who is Caucasian, said "banking while Black" should not have been viewed as a crime.

"This is just another classic example of what it's like living your life as a Black male," she told BuzzFeed News. "The checks are for real. Why was there an issue? Why could you not verify them? You're a bank, after all - it's your job to verify checks."

The bank issued a swift apology for the experience Thomas had at their banking center. "Local police should not have been involved. We strongly condemn racism and discrimination of any kind," TCF Bank said in a statement to the Free Press.

"We take extra precautions involving large deposits and requests for cash and in this case, we were unable to validate the checks presented by Mr. Thomas and regret we could not meet his needs."

Thomas closed his account at TCF Bank and deposited the checks at another bank - where they cleared in 12 hours.

"I want to be vindicated," Thomas told the Free Press. He said he feared being arrested that day because he knows what happens to men with dark skin who don't toe the line.

"I feel very intimidated because I knew that if I would have gotten loud, they would have had me on the ground for disturbance of the peace," he said.

"I didn't give them any type of indication that I was getting upset. I wanted to make sure I stayed as levelheaded as possible, because I wasn't going to be the next person on the ground saying, 'I can't breathe.'"

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A Pennsylvania couple is out on bond after they spent $100,000 of $120,000 deposited into their bank account accidentally.

Robert and Tiffany Williams, of Montoursville, Pa., found the $120,000 in their bank account and forgot to call the bank.

$120,000 intended for a business was accidentally transferred into their BB&T bank account because of a teller error, state trooper Aaron Brown told the Williamsport Sun-Gazette.

Brown said the couple went on a spending spree - knowing the money in the bank account wasn't theirs to spend.

The Williamses bought a camper, a Chevy and a racecar before giving $15,000 to their broke friends.

They spent a total of $100,000 in about 2½ weeks, WNEP reports.

The bank eventually realized the error and notified Tiffany Williams, 35, that she had X amount of days to return the cash, Brown told the Sun-Gazette.

Brown said the withdrawal resulted in a $107,416 overdraft because the couple had only $1,121 in their bank account.

Williams agreed to pay back the money if the bank put her on a payment plan.

The bank agreed to the payment plan, but Williams stopped making the payments and refused to return the bank's calls or emails.

The bank pressed charges and the couple was arrested and charged with three felony counts of theft by receiving.

The Sun-Gazette reported that the couple, in separate interrogations, told police that they "admitted to knowing the mislaid money did not belong to them, but they spent it anyway."

They appeared in court last week and posted bail of $25,000 each, according to The Washington Post.

A technical malfunction has left thousands of Rush Card users without funds to pay their rent, bills and daily necessities.

Media mogul Russell Simmons has reached out to his enraged customers through social media posts. Simmons took to his Facebook page to say Rush Card employees are "working 24/7" to resolve the malfunction.

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Steven Fields mugshot

Steven Fields will have plenty of time on his hands to think about his poor decision making. The 18-year-old Hull, GA man turned himself in on Friday and was charged with theft by taking for refusing to return $25,000 that a teller mistakenly deposited into his account.

Authorities say once Fields discovered his windfall, he immediately withdrew $20,000 cash and went on a $5,000 spending spree using his ATM card.

Authorities say Fields spent the money at a car dealership, and made purchases at various stores and a fast food restaurant.

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First Citizens bank A bank teller's careless error made one Athens teenager $31,000 richer, according to a report on Onlineathens.com.

The error occurred on March 7, when a man walked into the First Citizens Bank on U.S. Highway 29 in Athens and made a $31,000 deposit.

Several customers at the bank have the same name as the man, so the teller mistakenly put the deposit into the wrong account.

On March 17, the customer called the bank to report money missing from his account. Bank officials investigated the customer's report and discovered the teller's error.

But by that time, the 18-year-old had withdrawn $20,000 from his bank account and spent $5,000 more on purchases made with his ATM card.

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