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A radical new California law will allow college student athletes the right to profit from their names and likeness while they are still in school.

California Governor Gavin Newsom signed the Fair Pay for Play Act into law at a Los Angeles barbershop associated with LeBron James's HBO show The Shop: Uninterrupted.

James, 34, celebrated the Fair Pay for Play Act on Twitter.com on Monday. "You the man Governor Gav! Appreciate you as so many many more as well!" he tweeted.

The new law, which takes effect on January 1, 2023, makes it illegal for California colleges to deny student athletes the opportunities to earn hard cash for the use of their names, images and likenesses in video games, advertising, apparel and sports gear.

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The new act will benefit student athletes like LaMelo Ball, left, and Liangelo Ball, center, brothers of former Lakers star Lonzo Ball, right.

Student athletes will be allowed to earn money for sponsoring youth camps, just like professional athletes. They can also sign lucrative endorsement contracts with shoe companies, apparel companies, car dealerships, etc.

The law does not require colleges and universities to pay student athletes, but it collides head on with the NCAA's rules.

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California is the only state that allows college student athletes the right to be paid for their own names and likeness.

According to Sports Illustrated, California colleges, the Pac-12 Conference, the Mountain West Conference and the NCAA will all challenge the legality of the new law.

A lot is riding on the line for California schools.

Once the Act goes into effect, California colleges will no longer be permitted to participate in national championships organized or sponsored by the NCAA. And California schools might be kicked out of the NCAA altogether.

But supporters of the law, including James, believe the pros of the new law outweighs the cons.

John M Lund Photography Inc

Democrats in one California city are experimenting with a privately funded solution to wipe out poverty - by giving away free cash.

125 residents in Stockton, California don't have to worry about where there next meal is coming from. They receive $500 in "universal basic income" each month. No strings attached.

JGI/Jamie Grill

Susie Garza is one lucky recipient of free cash. On the 15th of every month she receives $500 on a debit card from a nonprofit organization that is experimenting with universal basic income to determine if it makes a difference in the lives of people earning below the poverty level.

Garza, who may or may not be a legal U.S. citizen, is unemployed. Her husband doesn't work either, so the extra money she receives each month comes in handy.

According to the Associated Press, Garza can use the cash however she wants. She says she uses $150 to pay her cellphone bill. Another $100 goes to her vet for her pet dog.

She also lavishes birthday gifts and junk food on her grandsons. She used to be a drug addict but that's in her past. She says she's been off drugs for 18 years now.

"I like it because I feel more independent, like I'm in charge. I really have something that's my own," she tells the AP.

John M Lund Photography Inc

The experiment is monitored by a group of researchers whose goal for the program is not finances but happiness.

Jovan Bravo, a 31-year-old Stockton native and construction worker, is married and has three children, ages 13, 8 and 4.

He says the extra $500 he receives each month gives him the freedom to spend more time with his wife and kids.

He said before the free money windfall he had to work multiple jobs and he didn't have enough time for his children.

Now he only works one Saturday a month. He uses the other Saturdays to play with his kids in the park.

"It's made a huge difference," he told the AP. "Just being able to spend more time with the wife and kids, it brings us closer together."

Republicans criticize the program because they say it encourages people not to work for a living.

Democratic candidates hope to expand the free cash program nationwide, if one of them is elected president in November 2020.

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U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris, a leading candidate for the nomination, has a proposal to give up to $500 a month to working families.

Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang, a tech entrepreneur who is a long shot for the nomination, wants to give $1,000 to every American.

Harris' plan to give $500 a month to working families earning up to $100,000 annually would cost about $275 billion per year, according to the Tax Policy Center.

Yang's proposal to give $1,000 to every adult in America would cost $2.8 trillion per year.

Both candidates say they will pay for their free money programs by reversing President Trump's tax cuts and increasing taxes on corporations.

Garza, who is the only breadwinner in her family, says she doesn't know what she will do when the privately funded program ends in July 2020.

She says she asked the program director how she was lucky enough to get into the program.

"She goes, 'Because you're blessed,'" Garza said. "And I just left it at that."

Kelly Rowland

A severe influenza outbreak in California is creating panic as the death toll rises and hundreds are sickened statewide.

According to the Los Angeles Times, health department officials say 27 people younger than 65 have died of the flu in California since October. Only 3 people died from the flu at the same time last year.

Doctors say a statewide shortage of flu medicine and packed emergency rooms led to a general sense of panic among all residents, including singer Kelly Rowland, pictured above right, who wore a surgical mask to her doctor's office on Thursday.

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boy studying book

Three out of four black boys in California schools don't meet reading and writing standards, according to data obtained by CALmatters from the state Department of Education.

The data shows, for example, nearly 80 percent of black boys in the fourth grade failed to meet state reading standards.

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Uber driver

A California Uber driver eavesdropped on a conversation between 2 female passengers and discovered they were pimps running a sex trafficking ring. Uber driver Keith Avila is being hailed as a hero for helping police bust up the ring and rescue a 16-year-old girl.

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Leah Kritzer missing A 14-year-old California girl went missing after walking the family dog, ktla.com reports. Leah Kritzer vanished after taking the family dog, Popeye, for a walk in Manhattan Beach on Sunday. Her parents became aware of her disappearance when a neighbor found Popeye roaming free.

“So went out to see her and there was our dog with the leash on and our daughter wasn’t there and she hasn’t come home since,” said her father Joe Kritzer, an attorney.

Leah's parents believe she was taken by a man she met on the dating website OKCupid. Apparently Leah was promiscuous and had met other men off the website.

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