CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Civil rights leader and U.S. congressman John Lewis passed away on Friday after a battle with cancer. He was 80.

Lewis, a member of the U.S. House of Representatives and a key figure in the civil rights movement in the 1960s, passed away a year after confirming he was battling stage four pancreatic cancer.

He was a Democrat, who represented a majority Black district covering most of Atlanta, Georgia.

Bettmann Collection via Getty Images

Lewis, left, is pictured with (L-R) civil rights leader C.T. Vivian, Reverend Martin Luther King Jr., and Lester McKinnie at Fisk University, an HBCU in Nashville on May 05, 1964. Rev. C.T. Vivian died this week in Atlanta at age 95.

Lewis was one of the 'Big Six' civil rights leaders, which included Martin Luther King, Jr., and he helped organize the historic 1963 March on Washington.

Upon news of his death on July 17, representatives from civil rights group the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) tweeted that they were "deeply saddened," noting: "His life-long mission for justice, equality and freedom left a permanent impression on our nation and world. The NAACP extends our sincerest condolences to his family, and we send prayers of comfort and strength to all."

Bettmann Collection via Getty Images

Blood-splattered Freedom Riders, John Lewis (left) and James Zwerg (right) stand together after being attacked and beaten by pro-segregationists in Montgomery, Alabama on May 20, 1961.

In a statement, former President Barack Obama said he had spoken with Lewis after a virtual town hall with a group of activists following the death of George Floyd.

Obama added that Lewis could not have been prouder of their efforts, writing, "a new generation standing up for freedom and equality".

AFP via Getty Images

"Not many of us get to live to see our own legacy play out in such a meaningful, remarkable way. John Lewis did," he said. "And thanks to him, we now all have our marching orders - to keep believing in the possibility of remaking this country we love until it lives up to its full promise."

The White House praised Lewis' legacy on Twitter, and Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds ordered flags at half-staff in honor of Lewis.

President Trump, who arrived at his Virginia golf course around 9:15 a.m. Saturday -- minutes after Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany tweeted about Lewis, did not acknowledge the civil rights leader's death on Twitter.

Lewis' death comes a week after a U.S. Congresswoman prematurely tweeted that he had died on July 11.

"It's only rumors," Michael Collins told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. "He is resting comfortably at home."

Congresswoman Alma S. Adams, who initially tweeted Lewis had died, apologized for her error.

"We deeply regret a previous tweet based on a false news report." According to AJC, "a blog that focuses on news about historically black colleges & universities" also falsely reported that Lewis was dead on July 11.

Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Monday, Jan. 20, is Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, a federal holiday in America. Black Twitter users sent the hashtag #MLKDay trending on the social media platform.

The hashtag generated tens of thousands of tweets paying tribute to the slain civil rights leader. But one tweet in particular caught Black Twitter's eye.

The tweet was sent by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), who many accused of tapping Dr. King's phones in motel rooms and sending tapes of his sexual exploits to his wife, Coretta Scott King, pictured below with King and their first child, Yolanda King, in 1956.

Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

The tweet accompanied a nighttime photo of a memorial to Dr. King installed at the entrance to the FBI Academy in Quantico, Virginia.

"Today, the FBI honors the life and work of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. A quote from Dr. King is etched in stone at the FBI Academy's reflection garden in Quantico as a reminder to all students and FBI employees: "The time is always right to do what is right." #MLKDay

Photo may have been deleted

As they do every year when the FBI remembers King on his holiday, Black Twitter was ready to throw jabs and daggers.

Not willing to let bygones be bygones Black Twitter reminded the FBI that ex-director J. Edgar Hoover tapped Dr. King's phones and hounded him to his grave.

Photo may have been deleted

Photo may have been deleted

Photo may have been deleted

Zhukova Dasha

Buro 24/7 website editor-in-chief Miroslava Duma sparked outrage by publishing an interview with Garage magazine editor-in-chief Zhukova Dasha. A photo accompanying the interview shows Zhokova posing on a 'black woman chair'. Zuma, who posted the image on her Instagram and Facebook pages, defended the photo as a work of art. But some are calling it 'racist art'.

Sensitive art critics bristled at the fact that Zuma posted the image during the celebration of civil rights icon Martin Luther King Jr's birthday.

Read more »

Nelson Mandela

South Africa's first black president Nelson Mandela passed away at his home today. He was 95. Tributes and condolences flooded social networking websites as world leaders, former presidents, celebrities and citizens of the world remembered the anti-apartheid civil rights leader.

President Obama spoke on Mandela's passing from the White House about 45 minutes after the announcement that Mandela had died.

"He no longer belongs to us. He belongs to the ages," said Obama, borrowing the words of Edwin M. Stanton, who, as Abraham Lincoln lay on his deathbed, said "He now belongs to the ages.”

Read more »

Bill Cosby Talks to Don Lemon

Comedian and philanthropist Bill Cosby says there are some serious issues affecting black America and he knows how to solve them.

In an interview with CNN's Don Lemon, Cosby, 76, said black women are the majority head of households, and he wants to see more black men taking responsibility for their sons.

“I think it has to come from the universities,” he said. "I think, women, strongly because when you see 70 percent, in research, that says they are the leaders of the household, what we need is for people to realize I want to raise my kid. I want to go back and get my three kids. I want to take on that responsibility. I want to love my children.”

Cosby also criticized "no-gross" who don't provide solutions but are quick to blame him for focusing on the problems in the black community.

Read more »