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Four former Minneapolis police officers charged in the death of George Floyd were mobbed by protesters as they left the Hennepin County courthouse on Friday.

The four attended a pre-trial hearing where their attorneys filed motions to dismiss the charges against them. Judge Peter Cahill ruled he would not rule on the defense motions to dismiss the charges.

The judge also declined to rule on motions to combine the four cases into one trial.

Former officer Derek Chauvin is charged with second-degree murder, third-degree murder, and second-degree manslaughter in Floyd's death on May 25.

Viral video captured Chauvin kneeling on Floyd's neck for over 8 minutes until he expired. The footage sparked violent protests in Minneapolis and around the country.

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Three former officers J. Alexander Kueng, Tou Thau and Thomas Lane (pictured above) were fired from the police force and later charged with aiding and abetting second-degree murder and aiding and abetting second-degree manslaughter.

Chauvin is the only former officer still in police custody while awaiting his murder trial.

Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman was disqualified from participating in the prosecution because he was present at an interview with a medical examiner, KHOU reported.

The judge also denied motions to allow two of Floyd's earlier arrests into the record to be used as evidence.

No date was given for any additional pre-trial hearings.

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The lawyers for slain black jogger Ahmaud Arbery have saluted JAY-Z for helping them seek justice. In an Instagram post, they revealed he chartered a private jet for them so they could attend a probable cause hearing for the defendants in Brunswick, Georgia.

S. Lee Merritt took to Instagram on Thursday to confirm the 50-year-old rap mogul and entrepreneur covered the costs of transporting himself and a colleague to court in Georgia.

"When you absolutely have to be in Court to stand with your client and righteous protestors for justice... Jay Z sends his private jet," he wrote under an Instagram snap of himself outside the plane.

"Court hearing in Brunswick, Georgia this morning. No flights to take us there last night. @leemerrittesq and I spent hours trying to find flights or cars. At 1am we started losing hope till we got a call from Jay Z’s people at Roc Nation who chartered a flight for us to attend this hearing with the family of Ahmaud Arbery," civil rights attorney Blerim Elmazi added.

Merritt also tweeted a photo of himself wearing a black face covering with the words "George Floyd" sewn on it.

He captioned the photo: "An early motion made by the defendants to the court was that I remove my mask. The court declined to consider the motion."

Arbery, 25, was shot and killed on February 23 in Glynn County, Georgia after being pursued and confronted by three white locals in pick-up trucks.

Three men were arrested in connection with the murder after video of the shooting surfaced online.

Comments Off on Fulton County Commissioner Marvin Arrington, Jr. accused of influencing judge to hold bond hearing for client while courthouse was closed during Coronavirus outbreak

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Fulton County Commissioner Marvin S. Arrington, Jr. is accused of using his political influence with the courts to schedule a bond hearing for his client on a day when the courthouse was closed during the Coronavirus outbreak in Atlanta.

Atlanta attorney Precious Anderson only found out about her ex-husband Kashka Scott's bond hearing when she searched the court database for hearings so she wouldn't get any surprises.

She was stunned to learn Scott's hearing was taking place on a day when the courthouse was officially closed during the virus outbreak. Anderson received no official notice of the hearing.

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Scott (pictured right) spent 6 days in jail on a charge of strangling another woman, according to Fox5 Atlanta News. Anderson was in the courtroom to watch her ex-husband's bond hearing unfold earlier this week.

Anderson wanted to be in attendance at the hearing because she is dealing with Mr. Scott on a variety of domestic and legal issues.

Child Protective Services opened 2 investigations into Scott in the last three weeks after receiving two separate complaints of child abuse from mandatory reporters.

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Anderson couldn't understand why -- with the courthouse shut down and no bond motion filed -- Scott was transported from jail and brought into court.

Anderson told Fox5 I-Team reporter Dale Russell why she believes Scott received preferential treatment over the other jailed detainees who don't have high profile attorneys.

"For him to have a hearing here today is just unbelievable, except for the fact of who represents him," she said, referring to Fulton County Commissioner Arrington.

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Arrington admitted he filed an "emergency bond motion" to get a hearing for Scott a half hour after the hearing was scheduled to begin.

Russell searched the court dockets and couldn't find a motion for an emergency bond hearing for Scott. Russell asked Arrington directly if he reached out to the judge personally to request a bond hearing.

Surprisingly, Arrington admitted that he did indeed reach out to the judge in her chambers.

"Uh, yes. I mean, that is something typical that attorneys will do," Arrington told Russell.

Arrington said Scott was concerned that he was locked up in a jail that wasn't adequately screening inmates for the virus.

Assistant District Attorney Adam Abbate told the judge he felt "blindsided" by the bond hearing. He argued that he received no advanced notice of a bond hearing and he had "no time" to review Scott's criminal history or prepare for the hearing.

So Abbate asked for a sky high bond of $150,000 for Scott based on his history of allegedly beating women and children.

Fulton County Superior Court Judge Rachel Krause admitted the surprise bond hearing was a "strange procedure" during an unusual time.

She said she cancelled an earlier hearing because of fears of a "packed courthouse" during the Coronavirus outbreak in Atlanta.

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Judge Krause said Scott was eligible for a $20,000 bond despite the domestic charges against him. She ordered Scott to make no contact with the woman he strangled or his three children by Anderson. "When I say no contact, I mean no contact," she told Scott.

Anderson, who owns The Anderson Firm, a boutique law firm in Atlanta, says she wished she had more time to prepare for the hearing.

"I'm a member of the bar. I believe in justice, and this is not [justice]," she told Russell.

"This is made for TV. It is made for TV," Anderson said.

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The jury viewed gruesome crime scene photos on day 2 of Henry Segura's 2nd murder trial on Wednesday. Segura is accused of killing his ex-girlfriend, Brandi Peters, her six-year-old twin daughters, Tamiyah and Taniyah Peters, and his own son, 3-year-old JaVante Segura.

All four bodies were found in Peters’ Tallahassee, Florida home on Nov. 20, 2010.

A medical examiner testified on Thursday that Brandi Peters, 27, was pistol whipped, beaten with a heavy, round object and shot to death. Evidence shows she fought for her life.

The bodies of her three children were found stacked in a bathtub. Tamiyah was shot in the back of the head and drowned and the other two children were drowned.

Segura was arrested 10 months later in Le Sueru County, Minnesota, where he fled after the murders.

At the time of the murders, Peters was a single, stay-at-home mother. Prosecutors claim the motive for the murders was $20,100 in child support payments Segura owed Peters for the care of his son, JaVante Segura.

Though Segura signed JaVante's birth certificate, he later claimed Peters told him the boy wasn't his. He said he was in the process of asking the state to perform a DNA test because he couldn't afford the several hundred dollars for the test.

In Segura's first murder trial in 2015, the jury was told his DNA was not found at the crime scene despite his testimony that he had sex with the victim.

The DNA of an unknown female was found under Peters' finger nails, and the DNA of an unknown male was also present on a door handle, bolt lock, phone cradle, Peters' purse, and a shovel at the scene.

Additionally, police recovered a mixed DNA sample from the victim's bedroom phone that was later matched to Angel Avila-Quinones, a member of a Colombian drug cartel who had just been released from federal prison.

Avila-Quinones fled to Italy, where investigators interviewed him but were unable to bring him to the United States due to Italy's tough extradition laws.

The jury did not hear about the DNA match because the evidence was ruled inadmissible in court. Prosecutors claimed Avila-Quinones left the country in 2009, before the murders.

Kelsey Kinard, Segura's former cellmate in an Oklahoma jail, testified that Segura confessed to the four murders in 2011.

A judge declared a mistrial when the jury couldn't reach a unanimous verdict in 2015.