Photo may have been deleted

Facebook

A Miami anesthesiologist has been charged with a hate crime after she allegedly punched a Hispanic man in a supermarket parking lot.

Dr. Jennifer Susan Wright, 58, lashed out at a male shopper who asked her to socially distance due to Covid-19 guidelines while at a supermarket in Hialeah, a Hispanic suburb of Miami.

According to the Miami Herald, the man asked her to back up -- and when she ignored him, he repeated "back up" in Spanish.

Dr. Wright reportedly "mumbled bad words," then walked up to him and hurled racial slurs and other insults.

The police report states Wright stabbed the man's tires with her car keys while telling the man to go back to his country.

A witness stated Wright told him, "Sp*c. We should've gotten rid of you when we could. This is not going to be Biden's America, this is my America."

She then allegedly punched and kicked the man.

Photo may have been deleted

Miami-Dade County Jail

The incident occurred on Jan. 20, but Wright wasn't arrested until Feb. 19, according to Miami-Dade County court records.

She was charged with criminal mischief, tampering with a victim, battery with prejudice, and a felony hate crime.

Dr. Wright, who is affiliated with Mount Sinai Medical Center, posted bond and was released Friday.

Wright has posted support for former President Donald Trump online, often sharing MAGA-themed memes and images, such as a profile photo that reads: "World knows Trump won #MAGA."

On February 9, Wright shared a meme on Facebook that said, "It's okay to be white." On February 12, she uploaded a meme that read, "They don't want you to have free speech. So they invented the term 'hate speech' to shut you up."

Photo may have been deleted

Instagram

An emergency medicine doctor in New York sparked fury on social media when he called the Covid-19 mRNA vaccines "reparations for Black people."

Dr. Steven McDonald is a board-certified emergency medicine attending physician at New York Presbyterian Hospital.

His credentials make him uniquely qualified to comment on Covid-19 vaccines. But he angered social media users when he said Black people should consider the vaccines as "reparations" for 200 years of slavery.

"You can think of the vaccines almost as medical reparations," he told VICE. "It's the 40 acres and a mule, um, but of 2021. So we really should be giving this vaccine preferentially to people of color..."

Doctors and globalists have repeatedly claimed that Blacks and Hispanics are "disproportionately affected" by the coronavirus.

The reaction was swift.

Social media activist Tariq Nasheed tweeted: "So, now vaccines are reparations?"

A Twitter user wrote: "By that logic, the Tuskegee Experiment is “reparations.""

"These people are insane," wrote an Instagram user. "Cut us our checks & we'll do what we need to do for ourselves."

Another commenter wrote: "I just reached out to [Dr. McDonald] to understand his rationale behind that statement. Let's see if he replies. Crazy times we live in."

Meanwhile, the White House on Wednesday announced yet another "study" on reparations for people of color.
 

Marko Geber/Getty Images

UnitedHealth Group, the nation's largest health insurance company, will begin matching patients with doctors based on their race.

According to UHC, matching patients with doctors of the same race will result in improved clinical outcomes, since same race physicians "often possess deeper knowledge of social determinants affecting their patients."

During a presentation in December, UHC said Black doctors "often understand African American patients' predisposition for colon cancer and pregnancy issues."

It isn't clear who biracial and mixed-race people will be matched with.

The insurance company said matching patients with doctors of the same race will bring down insurance costs and "lead to increased access to care and preventible health measures."

"Consumers would like to establish relationships with physicians who they are comfortable with -physicians of similar backgrounds, life experience, etc," read one slide in the presentation.

Photo may have been deleted

UnitedHealthCare

Another slide reads: "Clinical evidence shows that consumers benefit from having physicians of same race for diagnosis and treatment of frequently occurring medical conditions."

UHC will begin encouraging doctors to add racial information to their in-network directory profiles to help potential patients choose them based on skin color.

According to the company website, UHC takes pride in providing a culture of inclusiveness and diversity among its 125,000 clinicians.

While some Black doctors expressed optimism in the new initiative, some white doctors were offended.

"I don't like it because my race has nothing to do with my abilities," wrote one Caucasian doctor in a "2020 UHC Directory Survey" of doctors.

Another wrote: "This is an invasion of privacy and has no place in a professional setting."

And a third white doctor wrote: "I would refuse."

68 percent of doctors surveyed said they were willing to share their race in a physician directory.

Photo may have been deleted

YouTube

An outspoken emergency room doctor with a large following on social media made headlines when he wished death on Americans who choose to live their lives without fear.

On Feb. 3, Dr. Gilman reacted to a viral video that shows maskless shoppers in a Florida grocery store.

In a now-deleted tweet, Gilman wrote: "Naples, Florida. Let 'em die. I'm so tired of these people. No vaccine for y'all."

Photo may have been deleted

In a follow-up tweet, he wrote: "I'm working in the COVID ICU tonight! I'm so tired of giving 200% while others in the U.S. can’t even help by simply wearing a mask!"

When outraged Twitter followers reminded him that his impulsiveness got him fired from a hospital in Arizona, he blamed Republicans and walked back his statement.

"Republicans trying to take my words out of context as if I deny medical care to people that don't wear masks & 'let 'em die. My point is that we can't waste our energy on these COVID deniers. [They] are not gonna protect themselves so let 'em die. They'll find out the hard way."

On Nov. 22, Dr. Gilman was fired for lying about the lack of ICU beds in the state of Arizona.

Gilman tweeted that there were "no more ICU beds in the state of Arizona."

But Gov. Doug Ducey and the Department of Health disputed his tweet by confirming there were over 100 ICU beds available in the state that same day.

Gilman's tweets made him a celebrity on Twitter. He received a Zoom call from Joe Biden's transition team and Oprah Winfrey offered to send him and his family on vacation.

But others were not as tolerant of Gilman's attention-seeking tweets.

Envision, the agency that contracts him to work temporary assignments in hospitals, told him his services were no longer needed at Yuma Medical Center in Arizona.

When Gilman tweeted that he was "fired" from his temporary assignment, the hospital said it was all a "misunderstanding" and that he still worked shifts there.

But Gilman told a reporter that he was on the schedule to work but he had not been permitted to work his scheduled shifts.

"I was told by Envision that the hospital was not allowing me to return back due to a tweet," he said.

The hospital quietly told Envision that Gilman would not be allowed to "be vocal or outspoken" on social media.

Photo may have been deleted

Social media users lashed out at Gilman for his insensitive tweet about the maskless grocery store in Florida.

One Twitter user called Gilman "mentally unfit", while others expressed their support for him.

Photo may have been deleted

Photo may have been deleted

Photo may have been deleted

Photo may have been deleted

Photo may have been deleted

Dr. Gilman attempted to go viral with a rap song about Covid-19 last year, but it flopped.
 

Photo may have been deleted

Photo by New York Post

A top emergency room doctor who worked on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic in Manhattan took her own life after contracting the virus.

Dr. Lorna Breen was the head of the emergency department at a Manhattan hospital when she contracted Covid-19 after spending hectic days working in the ER.

Breen, 49, died Sunday at her family home in Charlottesville, Virginia, where she'd been staying while recuperating from the disease.

Breen's father, Philip Breen, said his daughter fell ill with the virus while on the job, but she attempted to return to work after only a week and a half of recuperating.

The hospital ordered her to return home, and her family brought her back to Virginia, where she shot herself in the head with a gun belonging to her retired NYPD dad.

"She was truly in the trenches on the front line," Philip Breen told the Times.

"Make sure she's praised as a hero," he added. "She's a casualty just as much as anyone else who has died."

Philip said his daughter did not have a history of psychological problems.

Photo may have been deleted

Photo: Twitter.com/@yaletung

A doctor based in Spain has self-quarantined in his home after he was diagnosed with the Covid-19 virus on Sunday. Dr. Yale Tung Chen contracted the virus while treating patients. He decided to document the course of his illness online to help relieve the public's fear and anxiety over the outbreak.

Covid-19 is a virus similar to the flu that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) among the elderly population and those with chronic illness, people with weak immune systems, or smokers.

Dr. Yale Tung Chen began documenting his illness in an online diary on day 1, telling his Twitter followers he had a sore throat and developed "a dry cough and a strong headache". He said he had a low-grade fever which "soon disappeared over the weekend."

He said, "It was reassuring to see [his lungs] were completely normal" on lung scans.

Day 2

"The headache and the sore throat started to fade away on day two. On the lungs there appeared to be a little effusion [liquid] with signs of pneumonia on the back." The doctor stated he had developed mild pneumonia which he is treating at home by taking Motrin and Tylenol and doing push ups, adding: "I'm doing fine."

Those with weak immune systems will need to be seen in hospital if they develop pneumonia.

Day 3

Dr. Yale Tung Chen said: "Today the cough went heavily up, and has now calmed. Diarrhea started." Referring to his ultrasound of his lungs, he said it "remained similar" to the previous chest scans. "I'm feeling well, and there is no data to say the opposite."

Day 4

Dr. Yale Tung Chen told LBC News he was feeling "awfully tired" by Thursday - four days after his diagnosis. He said his latest ultrasound shows pneumonia in the middle lobe of his right lung. "More cough & tiredness (very badly), still no [pain on inhaling]/chest pain." More fluid buildup in left lung.

Photo may have been deleted

He said he was "overwhelmed" by the public response to his health diary.

For most healthy people under age 60, the novel coronavirus causes only mild symptoms such as cough, headache, sore throat and low-grade fever.

The virus can cause serious illness among the elderly population, particularly those with existing health problems such as heart and respiratory problems or diabetes.

So far, the majority of the 38 deaths in the US are elderly and chronically ill. The average age is 80.

Photo may have been deleted

Photos: Weibo.com

A prominent Chinese doctor who tried to warn fellow doctors about the deadly coronavirus has died, the hospital treating him confirmed.

Dr. Li Wenliang died after he contracted the virus from a single coronavirus patient he treated in a Wuhan hospital. He was 34.

Wuhan Central Hospital, where Li was treated in ICU, confirmed his death on Friday, Feb. 7, after initially denying reports that he died on Thursday.

On Dec. 30, Li sent a chat group message to fellow doctors warning them about seven patients who had been quarantined in a Wuhan hospital with a mysterious illness that resembled SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome).

Within hours, the message went viral on social media, and Li was summoned to the Public Security Bureau, the BBC News reported.

"When I saw [the message] circulating online, I realized that it was out of my control and I would probably be punished," Li told CNN from his hospital bed in Wuhan.

The police demanded Li sign a document denying his claims about a new virus. Meanwhile, thousands of people contracted the illness and hundreds died before Chinese officials announced the epidemic on Jan. 8.

The Chinese government is accused of suppressing the true scale of the epidemic. The death toll has doubled in just 24 hours to 630 with over 28,000 infections worldwide. But critics say the true numbers are probably much higher.

There are 12 confirmed coronavirus cases so far in the United States.

Dr Boutte

A Gwinette-based dermatologist and plastic surgeon is under investigation after former patients filed malpractice complaints against her. Channel 2 Action News reports Dr. Windell Boutte settled 5 medical malpractice lawsuits in the past six months.

Read more »