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A group of concerned Atlanta activists traveled to Joe Biden's campaign stop in South Carolina last weekend to ask Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms why she is not doing enough to stop gentrification in her city.

According to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, one of the activists created a Facebook flyer featuring the mayor's face with the words "HELP FIND ME!"

"Last seen campaigning with Joe Biden. We need her back to do some work in Atlanta," read the caption.

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Mayor Bottoms frequently travels out of town to support Biden at campaign events. The AJC reports Mayor Bottoms attended Biden campaign events in Iowa, Alabama and Tennessee in February alone.

Atlanta activists say they are concerned that Bottoms isn't doing enough to halt the progression of gentrification or stop low-income Black people from being displaced from their homes.

The mayor's spokesperson said in February Bottoms halted gentrification construction on the Westside, committed $100 million for affordable housing and signed legislation to create the city's first Inspector General -- all while juggling her duties as wife and mom and campaigning for her potential running mate, Biden.

"The mayor can walk and chew gum at the same time," her spokesperson told AJC.com, before adding that all of her campaign trips were on the weekends.

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At a Biden campaign event in South Carolina last weekend, Bertha Darden, a longtime Peoplestown resident, scored face time with Biden after unsuccessfully trying to locate Mayor Bottoms.

Darden asked Biden to "please tell her to stop evicting and displacing Black families in Atlanta."

Biden, who is showing signs of dementia, called Bottoms a great mayor and began describing problems with gentrification -- in North Carolina.

When Darden told Biden that the city of Atlanta used eminent domain to steal her house, Biden promised to have a conversation with her at a later date.

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Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms rushed back to Atlanta after citizens expressed disappointment with her leadership skills on social media.

Citizens and civic leaders complained that Lance Bottoms, 50, was often on the campaign trail with presidential hopeful Joe Biden.

On Monday, Lance Bottoms issued an Administrative Order allocating $100 million to create more affordable housing in Atlanta.

"Building a housing inventory that working families and seniors can afford is a major component of our vision for One Atlanta," she said in a statement. "These new public dollars will further our mission to create a more equitable and affordable city for all those who desire to call Atlanta home."

Also on Monday, Mayor Lance Bottoms issued an executive order cracking down on new construction permits around Westside Park to halt "rapid gentrification" in the area.

The timing of the mayor's orders are no coincidence.

Black leaders complained that gentrification was changing the landscape of Atlanta neighborhoods that have traditionally been overlooked by lenders and real estate investors.

They also complained about the rising crime rate in Atlanta and the surrounding suburbs. They demanded Lance Bottoms leave the Biden campaign trail to deal with the rising crime rate at home.

Fed up with the mayor's frequent absences from the city she was elected to lead, Atlanta activist and businesswoman Sabrina Peterson is organizing an effort to block her reelection.

Mayor Lance Bottoms is pictured above with her husband Derek W. Bottoms at a recent Atlanta Hawks game at State Farm Arena in Atlanta.

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Black voters are waking up to the sobering fact that the Democratic Party may not have their best interests at heart.

Presidential hopefuls traveled to Atlanta to take part in the Democratic debate on Wednesday, Nov. 20.

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Cory Booker, left, and Kamala Harris, right, are mixed race candidates who claim to represent Black Americans. But Black voters say the candidates didn't touch on the issues that concern Black voters.

"I was disappointed at the fact that two of the most controversial issues concerning Georgia – reproductive rights and election integrity – were only discussed in the last 11 minutes of the debate, said Howard student and Atlanta native Keri Felton.

Council member Khalid Kamau was also disappointed in the candidates.

"These candidates and the media came to Atlanta, to the Atlanta University Center, Paschal's restaurant, and told us how important we are. Then they get on TV and barely mention us. It's like dating a f-ckboy," Kamau said.

Activists also point to the rapid gentrification of Atlanta, a formerly majority Black city.

"For working-class ATLiens, it's not working out for us," said Sankara Lumumba. "We've gotten rid of public housing, the city is becoming less Black, the administration of this city doesn't match up to what is being publicly put out there."

Lumumba volunteers with the Community Movement Builders who fight gentrification in Atlanta. Gentrification is a term that describes the takeover of Black and urban neighborhoods by developers and wealthy investors who raise property taxes to force Black homeowners out of their neighborhoods.

Activists blame Black politicians for permitting gentrification in Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthplace.

"There's a black political elite that's teamed up with the economic elite and they run the city," said Kamau Franklin, the organization’s founder. "They don't run it for working-class or poor black folks. They run it to further capitalist development. It's a whitewash of what the Black Mecca is supposed to be."

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Howard University students are at war with their rich neighbors who use the campus yard like it's a dog park. For weeks now the students have expressed their concern about neighbors bringing their dogs to soil the historical campus yard.

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