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LeBron James voiced his concerns about the plethora of glitches that marred Georgia's primary elections on Tuesday.

The Lakers star questioned whether the faulty machines and long lines were "structurally racist."

"Everyone talking about "how do we fix this?" They say "go out and vote?" What about asking if how we vote is also structurally racist?" James tweeted.

James responded to a reporter who noticed the lack of problems voting in the suburbs: "I come over to this side of town, and white folks are strolling in. On my side of town, we brought stadium chairs."

An investigation has been launched into the voting machine breakdowns and long lines which resulted.

Atlanta voters were forced to wait as long as four hours to vote.

Multiple counties reported problems with the voting machines, and confusion reigned over coronavirus rules.

Georgia also received over 1.2 million mail-in ballots -- a record for elections in Georgia.

Georgia usually receives around 40,000 mail-in ballots in any given election, UPI reported.
 

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The Georgia Bureau of Investigation confirmed they are reviewing new surveillance video that shows Ahmaud Arbery was trespassing inside a property under construction.

The new video conflicts with the narrative that 25-year-old Ahmaud Arbery was out for a jog when he was confronted on the road and fatally shot by father and son white supremacists in Brunswick, Georgia.

Arbery was gunned down on Feb. 23 in Satilla Shores, a working class majority white neighborhood in Glynn County in south Georgia.

The triggerman, Travis McMichael, 34, and his father, former cop Gregory McMichael were arrested on Thursday and charged with felony murder and aggravated assault by the GBI.

Cellphone video shows Travis McMichael and Arbery wrestling over Travis' shotgun before Arbery was shot 3 times and bled out on the ground.

Arbery's mother, Wanda Cooper Jones, said her son was out jogging in the neighborhood when he was shot and killed.

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Screenshot: GBI

But new surveillance video obtained by the Atlanta Journal-Constitution newspaper shows a person who appears to be Arbery walking near a construction site just down the road from his fatal encounter with the McMichaels.

Arbery, wearing a white t-shirt and khaki shorts, is seen entering a house under construction through the open garage. He disappears from camera view and moments later, he quickly emerges from the house through the front door.

A neighbor wearing overalls stands across the road observing the construction site. A car passes, and a minute later, Arbery runs down Satilla Drive toward Travis McMichael's house.

According to ABC News, Travis called police 12 days before the shooting to report seeing a Black man enter a nearby construction property. The man ran off and Travis waited out front until police arrived.

Benjamin Crump, the attorney representing Arbery's father, said the new video doesn't change the facts that Arbery was simply "out for a jog," and his murder was not justified.

"Our office has reviewed the surveillance video which appears to show a person, believed to be Ahmaud Arbery, entering a property under construction," Crump said in a statement on Saturday. "The individual remains on the property for under 3 minutes before continuing to jog down the road. This video is consistent with the evidence already known to us. Ahmaud Arbery was out for a jog. He stopped by a property under construction where he engaged in no illegal activity and remained for only a brief period. Ahmaud did not take anything from the construction site. He did not cause any damage to the property. He remained for a brief period of time and was not instructed by anyone to leave but rather left on his own accord to continue his jog.

"Ahmaud's actions at this empty home under construction were in no way a felony under Georgia law. This video confirms that Mr. Arbery’s murder was not justified and the actions of the men who pursued him and ambushed him were unjustified. We reiterate, Ahmaud Arbery did not take part in ANY felony, had no illegal substances in his system, was not armed yet was shot three times with a shotgun at close range."

Arbery's father, Marcus Arbery Sr., spoke to Atlanta ABC affiliate WSB at a rally on Saturday.

"If he committed a crime, why don't you call the authorities?" Marcus Arbery said. "But you came at him like you were hunting an animal."

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Screen grab: YouTube.com

Two white men were arrested Thursday and charged with the death of an unarmed Black male who was gunned down while running through a majority white neighborhood in Brunswick, Ga. on Feb. 23.

Georgia authorities charged Travis McMichael, 34, and his father, former cop Gregory McMichael, 64, with murder and aggravated assault in the death of 25-year-old Ahmaud Arbery.

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Glynn County Detention Center

The suspects were booked into the Glynn County Detention Center late Thursday.

The McMichaels and a neighbor pursued Arbery in a pickup truck and a car as he ran down a street in Satilla Shores, a majority white, middle class enclave in Glynn County.

Arbery was shot three times, Glynn County Coroner Marc Neu said. He died at the scene, "bleeding out" within minutes.

Arbery's mother, Wanda Cooper Jones, said her son was out jogging. But the McMichaels claimed Arbery was a "burglary suspect," and they believed they were within their rights to kill him in self-defense.

Arbery's death sparked national outrage that peaked Wednesday with the release of a cell phone video that showed the violent confrontation between Travis McMichael and Arbery before he died.

The Glynn County police on Wednesday called in the Georgia Bureau of Investigations (GBI) to determine who leaked the cell phone video to the media.

Brunswick defense attorney Alan Tucker identified himself Thursday as the person who leaked the video to WGIG radio station.

In a statement to News4Jax, Tucker said he wasn't representing any side in the case. He said he released the video "because people had the right to know" and "because my community was being ripped apart by erroneous accusations and assumptions."

Tucker did not say how he obtained the video. The shocking cell phone footage put tiny Brunswick, Ga. in the international spotlight.

Outraged celebrities and politicians weighed in on the case. Former Vice President Joe Biden said the video is "clear" and Arbery was ambushed and "killed in cold blood." He wrote that his heart goes out to Arbery's family and he called for a transparent investigation into the "murder".

President Trump was criticized for not commenting on the case earlier. Trump told reporters on Thursday: "It's a very sad thing... but I will be given a full report this evening."

Whoopi Goldberg was among those who criticized President Trump for waiting to comment on Arbery's death. "If two Black men shot a white guy, Trump would be outraged," she said.

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Photos: Handout, Getty Images

A Georgia prosecutor on Tuesday recommended a grand jury review of the fatal shooting of Ahmaud Arbery, an unarmed Black man who was killed by two white men while running through a majority white neighborhood in Brunswick, Georgia on Feb. 23.

District Attorney Tim Durden announced he would present the case to the grand jury to determine if any charges should be filed against the two men.

A graphic dash cam video, that showed the fatal shooting, was uploaded to YouTube on Tuesday.

Former Vice President Joe Biden weighed in on the case on Twitter.com Tuesday. He said the video is "clear" and Arbery was ambushed and "killed in cold blood." He wrote that his heart goes out to Arbery's family and he called for a transparent investigation into the "murder".

The video footage shows Arbery, 25, running at a jogger's pace along a leafy street in Brunswick's south end on Feb. 23. He was confronted by a former cop, Greg McMichael, 64, and his son Travis McMichael, 34.

Travis McMichael and Arbery struggled over a shotgun while Greg McMichael pointed a .357 magnum at Arbery from the bed of his pickup truck.

Three shots rang out. Arbery was shot in the chest and collapsed face down in the roadway. He died where he fell, bleeding out on the pavement. There were no arrests in the case.

Before recusing himself, George E. Barnhill, the district attorney for Georgia's Waycross Judicial Circuit, wrote a long letter explaining why he didn't bring charges against the McMichaels.

Calling Arbery a "burglary suspect," Barnhill concluded Travis McMichael "was allowed to use deadly force to protect himself."

But Michael J. Moore, an Atlanta lawyer, told the New York Times in an email that Barnhill's opinion is "flawed".

Moore said the McMichaels appear to be the aggressors in the confrontation, and they were not justified in using deadly force under Georgia's self-defense laws.

"The law does not allow a group of people to form an armed posse and chase down an unarmed person who they believe might have possibly been the perpetrator of a past crime," Moore wrote.

President Trump has not weighed in on the Arbery case.
 

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The line queued down the block outside one Atlanta barbershop on the first official day of Georgia's reopening.

Friday, April 24, was the first phase of Gov. Brian Kemp's plan to reopen Georgia. On Monday, Kemp announced that local establishments could reopen for business following a one month lockdown to prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

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Graphic: WSB-TV

Customers waited in line after 7 a.m. outside Peachtree Battle Barber Shop in Atlanta's upscale Buckhead neighborhood.

Matt Maddox was one of the customers waiting in line to get his hair cut amid the fear and uncertainty.

"I certainly don't want to spread it to anyone so I've got a mask, but I'm not really concerned," Maddox told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. "If you're cutting hair or you're a waiter, you haven't been working, so it helps get the economy started again."

At Studio 151 in Dallas, Georgia, the first appointment was at 6:20 a.m., according to the salon's owner.

Stephen Richardson's salon in Dallas, Ga, started losing business the week of March 10, according to the AJC.com. By March 26, he was ordered to shut his doors because he wasn't an essential business.

"I went from 100% to zero," Richardson told the AJC. He said he had to comply with a 14-page list of safety guidelines issued by the state. He added some of his own to keep his customers safe.

"We have our very own concerns, but we need our clients," he said. His protocols include one client at a time and temperature checks at the door.

By noon Friday, Richardson and another stylist were seeing a steady stream of clients.

"People are pretty much getting in and out," Richardson said. "I give the clients credit. Every client that has shown up has had a mask."

Barber shops and hair salons were grateful to do brisk business after a month of no revenue. But Some businesses were so devastated by the coronavirus lockdown that they will never recover.

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Georgia Governor Brian Kemp refuses to order a statewide lockdown, while Democratic-controlled states go to extreme measures to control the spread of the flu-like Covid-19 virus.

According to the AJC.com, Kemp ordered a series of measures to control the spread of the virus. But he stopped short of infringing on the rights and civil liberties of millions of people who will not get sick.

On Monday, Kemp announced he is instituting a ban on public gatherings of more than 10 people and he ordered a shelter in place for "medically fragile" people for two weeks.

Ordering the medically fragile to stay indoors makes more sense than restricting the movements of healthy people, keeping restaurants closed, and destroying the state's economy.

The news comes as President Donald Trump indicated he will lift restrictions and allow businesses to reopen in many states by next Monday.

The AJC reports Kemp faced "increasing pressure" to impose stiffer restrictions on the residents of his state.

He said the ban on public gatherings of more than 10 people ensures the spacing of "at least six feet between people at all times" so that businesses such as grocery stores, banks, pharmacies, and home improvement stores can remain open.

"We are all part of the solution. If your friends, neighbors or local organizations are not complying, call them out. Or report them to us," Kemp said.

"The fight is far from over, but we are in this fight together," Kemp continued. "Look out for your fellow Georgians and pray for their continued safety, as well as the safety of our first responders, healthcare workers, the elderly and the medically fragile."

The novel coronavirus has infected over 100,000 people in the United States, although only 46,000 cases are confirmed. That puts the fatality rate far under 1% and closer to the influenza fatality rate of 0.1%.

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Georgia Governor Brian Kemp held a late night press conference on Monday to announce confirmation of the first Coronavirus in Atlanta.

Two people who live in the same household tested positive for the Covid-19 virus. The couple are the first in Georgia to test positive for the virus.

Kemp and state officials announced the news at a hastily arranged press conference, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported.

The couple, who live in Fulton County, showed minor symptoms of the illness shortly after one of the people returned to Georgia from a business trip to Milan, Italy.

"I want to reassure you that they're at home, in home isolation with other household members, with minimal symptoms so they're not hospitalized," said Dr. Kathleen Toomey, head of the state's public health department.

Dr. Toomey said the person who traveled to Italy detected the symptoms immediately and contacted his doctor upon returning to Atlanta. He was advised to stay home and wash his hands frequently.

The news comes as Washington state reported 6 Coronavirus deaths -- all in the same nursing facility in Kirkland. The 6 elderly women were in their 70s and 80s.

President Donald Trump is set to visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta on Friday. He has urged calm and said the risk to the American public remains low.

People who are at most risk are the elderly and those with weak immune systems. Most people who are 50 or younger who were infected with the Coronavirus have fully recovered.

Apple founder Steve Wozniak and his wife Janet say they may have been infected with the Covid-19 virus during a trip to China in January.

Wozniak tweeted on Monday that he and his wife had sore throats and coughs when they returned to the U.S. on Jan. 4.

Although they have fully recovered, Wozniak contacted the CDC but he received a form letter advising them to wash their hands.

The Coronavirus is not as deadly as the common flu virus which has killed 10,000 people this flu season. The CDC is expecting 40,000 deaths from the flu virus by the end of the flu season.

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Photo: Georgia Department of Corrections

The lawyer for convicted killer Ray Cromartie ripped the state of Georgia for executing his client last night.

Cromartie, 52, died by lethal injection on Georgia's death row on Wednesday, Nov. 13. He was pronounced dead at 10:59 p.m. at the state prison in Jackson, Georgia, WSB-TV reports.

Cromartie was sentenced to death in the 1994 murder of store clerk Richard Slysz during an armed robbery of a convenience store in Thomasville, Ga.

Cromartie's attorney, Shawn Nolan, said the state ignored repeated requests for DNA testing that would have proven Cromartie's innocence.

"It is so sad and frankly outrageous that the state of Georgia executed Ray Cromartie tonight after repeatedly denying his requests for DNA testing that would have proven he did not kill Richard Slysz," Nolan said in a statement via WSB-TV. "In this day and age, where DNA testing is routine, it is shocking that Georgia decided to end this man's life without allowing us, his attorneys, access to the materials to do these simple tests."

Cromartie's execution didn't attract the same worldwide media attention as Rodney Reed, the Texas inmate who is scheduled to be executed by lethal injection on Nov. 20 for the 1996 murder of Stacey Stites, 19.

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Photo: Georgia Department of Corrections

Reed (pictured) was convicted based on his DNA linked to sperm found inside the victim. But he claimed he had consensual sex with Stites the day before she was killed.

Reed's lawyers are trying to overturn his conviction based on the testimony of seven new witnesses who point the finger at Stite's then-fiancé, Jimmy Fennell, a former police officer who was later convicted and sentenced to prison for the rape of another woman.

Reed's attorneys says he had a secret affair with Stites, a white woman who was on her way to work at a convenience store the morning she was raped and murdered.

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A Georgia sheriff is determined to protect children by putting "no trick-or-treat" signs in the yards of registered sex offenders.

Registered sex offenders in Butts County are suing the Sheriff's Office for putting signs in their yards to discourage young trick-or-treaters, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports.

Christopher Reed, Reginald Holden and Corey McClendon have asked a judge to order the law enforcement agency to stop warning children to avoid their homes on Halloween.

The registered sex offenders say deputies are trespassing on their land to place the unwanted signage.

The lawsuit was filed in U.S. District Court in Macon, Georgia, after Butts County deputies began placing the signs last year.

The signs read: "NO TRICK-OR-TREAT AT THIS ADDRESS!! A COMMUNITY SAFETY MESSAGE FROM BUTTS COUNTY SHERIFF GARY LONG."

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Butts County Sheriff's Office

Sheriff Long reportedly asked 200 sex offenders in the county to display their own signs in their yards, or face unspecified consequences.

A hearing is set for Thursday at 9:30 a.m. for a judge to decide whether the signs violate the rights of sex offenders.

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In the meantime, Sheriff Long's deputies will continue to plant signs in the yards of all sex offenders to protect the children in the county.

"Regardless of the Judge's ruling this Thursday, I WILL do everything within the letter of the Law to protect the children of this Community," the sheriff wrote on Facebook.

The lawsuit seeks a jury trial and financial compensation for the stress, fear and humiliation the signs caused last year.

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The mayor of a small Georgia town is on the hot seat for remarks she made about a Black candidate for the job of city administrator. Hoschton is a small Georgia hamlet that, until today, many Atlantans didn't know existed. Mayor Theresa Kenerly may have put put the tiny town of fewer than 2,000 residents on the map when she withheld a candidate from consideration for the job of city administrator because he is Black.

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