Photo by BACKGRID

Harvey Weinstein is "likely" to remain under his doctor's care at Manhattan's Bellevue Hospital until his sentencing on March 11, his attorney confirmed.

The disgraced movie mogul was rushed to the medical center on February, 24, while en route to Rikers Island prison after being found guilty of sexual assault and rape.

Weinstein, 67, complained of chest pain and shortness of breath shortly after hearing the split verdicts in a Manhattan courtroom.

Upon his arrival at the hospital, Weinstein was treated for heart palpitations and high blood pressure.

Photo by Spread Pictures / BACKGRID

Weinstein's wife Georgina Chapman (pictured with Weinstein in 2014) has not been to the hospital to visit him with his 2 youngest children. But he speaks to all of his children by phone.

In response to numerous media inquiries about Weinstein's discharge date from the hospital, Arthur Aidala, an attorney on Weinstein's legal team, told Variety that Weinstein will "likely" stay there until his court date next week.

Aidala denies reports that Weinstein is malingering or faking his illness to avoid being transferred to jail.

"(He's) likely there 'til sentencing on March 11. The treating doctors think that's where he should be - it's that simple," he said.

"It's no secret he was under several doctors' care over the course of the last couple of months. The doctors at Bellevue, up until today, at least, have determined that he's not ready to go to a non-medical facility. It's totally up to the medical team to make that determination. Obviously, nobody wants anything to happen to Mr. Weinstein because of his health."

Aidala added that the Department of Corrections is "making their own determinations" about Weinstein.

Meanwhile, Weinstein is getting the VIP treatment on the hospital's prison ward. There are no guards posted outside his room, and he has free run of the ward.

Recently, photos surfaced showing Weinstein in a media room watching television while relaxing on a sofa. His wheelchair was next to him. A source said Weinstein is ambulatory and he pushes his wheelchair like a walker.

Source: WENN.com

Photo may have been deleted

Photos: Instagram, Getty Images

Rapper French Montana was recently hospitalized with intense nausea, abdominal pain and an elevated heart rate - common warning signs of a heart attack. It is estimated that a heart attack occurs in the U.S. every 40 seconds.

Some patients report heart attacks without any signs or symptoms (S/S). But warning signs are most likely missed because the patient doesn't associate his symptoms with a heart attack.

Solar22 / iStock / Getty Images

Knowing the warning signs of a heart attack can save your life

A heart attack feels different for men and women.

Men may describe crushing pain or pressure in the chest area, left arm pain or tingling and shortness of breath.

Women may describe feeling slight discomfort in the chest, upper back pain, nausea and vomiting or jaw pain that feels like a toothache.

Warning Signs of Heart Attack in men

  • crushing chest pain or pressure in chest
  • back pain that radiates up to neck
  • jaw pain that feels like a toothache
  • pain in left arm or both arms or shoulders
  • nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain
  • cold sweat
  • lightheadedness or dizziness
  •  

    Warning Signs of Heart Attack in Women

  • slight to moderate discomfort in chest
  • upper back pain
  • neck and jaw pain
  • shortness of breath that comes on suddenly
  • lightheaded or dizziness
  • jaw, neck or back pain
  • burning or tingling in left arm or both arms or shoulders
  • nausea or vomiting, abdominal pain
  •  

    Heart attack treatment works best when started immediately after symptoms are felt. Paramedics arrive with equipment and drugs ready to begin heart attack treatment. If you believe you are experiencing a heart attack, it's safer to call 911 rather than attempt to drive yourself to the emergency room.

    This has been your Medical Minute.
     

    More Info On the Web

    What Does a Heart Attack Feel Like? | Healthline.com

    Heart Attack | Nih.gov

    Heart Attack Warning Signs | Heart.org
     

    DISCLAIMER

    Any medical information published on this blog is for your general information only and is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice. You should not take any action before consulting with your personal physician or a health care provider. Sandrarose.com and its affiliates cannot be held liable for any damages incurred by following information found on this blog.

    Photo by Win McNamee/Getty

    Questions surround President Donald Trump's unscheduled visit to Walter Reed National Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland on Saturday, Nov. 16.

    Rumors are swirling that Trump, 73, was rushed to the hospital complaining of chest pain.

    The White House released a statement saying Trump went to the hospital for a routine physical exam. But the report was quickly dismissed by Washington insiders.

    "The one thing you can be absolutely sure of is this was not routine and he didn't go up there for half his physical," tweeted Joe Lockhart, a press secretary under President Bill Clinton.

    Insiders whisper that Trump had a mild heart attack, and that he suffers from Angina, chest pain caused by narrowing of the arteries that feeds oxygen-rich blood to the heart muscles. Angina is a symptom of coronary artery disease.

    If the president did suffer a heart attack, it was likely caused by the stress of the ongoing impeachment hearings on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.

    Last week was tough for the real estate tycoon. Trump suffered a political defeat after his candidate for governor of Louisiana lost to sitting Governor John Bel Edwards in a state that Trump carried by nearly 20 percentage points in 2016.

    And in another setback, Trump's friend and former advisor Roger Stone was found guilty on seven charges of lying to Congress, obstruction of Congress, and witness tampering. Stone faces a maximum of 50 years in a federal prison.

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    For many people the first sign or symptom of heart disease is death. This is why heart disease is called the silent killer.

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    Attorney General of the United States Eric Holder

    Yesterday, news broke that Attorney General of the U.S. Eric Holder suffered chest pains, palpitations (rapid heartbeat) and shortness of breath during a Justice Dept. meeting. My initial thought was that Holder suffered a panic attack. Especially after it was revealed that doctors gave him medication to "return his heartbeat to normal" then discharged him. If his condition was all that serious he would have been hospitalized, if only to monitor him overnight.

    Of course, at 63, he could also be diagnosed with any number of heart ailments such as Ischemic Cardiomyopathy, Coronary Artery Disease, Angina, Congestive Heart failure, mild heart attack, etc. But based on his symptoms -- and the fact that hundreds of black pastors are calling for his impeachment -- I think he suffered a panic attack.

    Apparently, The Hufffington Post does, too.

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    Studies show that most women can't differentiate between a heart attack and indigestion.

    Most women who are having a heart attack put off going to the emergency room because the symptoms are so vague. Knowing the warning signs of a heart attack can mean the difference between life and death.

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