Nate Parker

Besieged filmmaker Nate Parker will not attend a press conference at the Toronto Film Festival.

Parker, who wrote, directed and produced the slavery movie Birth of a Nation, has come under fire for using a 17-year-old rape case to portray himself as a victim -- a black man accused of rape in America.

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I already knew that professional gold digger Tameka Foster ex-Glover ex-Raymond didn't write that article for Huffington Post. That's why I didn't waste my time posting it. Unlike the gullible public, I knew that Tameka wasn't articulate enough to string together a coherent paragraph unless she copied and pasted it from somewhere -- or someone else helped her write it.

From BV Buzz By Jawn Murray:

When Tameka Foster posted the blog entry "She's Pretty for a Dark-Skinned Girl..." on The Huffington Post, both celebrities and regular women alike celebrated her blog message on Twitter and Facebook.

Unbeknownst to them, while they were saluting Usher Raymond's soon-to-be ex-wife's essay on skin complexion, author Aisha Curry, who wrote the book 'Pretty For a Black Girl' (AuthorHouse/$10.49) read the piece and felt outraged that her tome had been apparently been lifted and used by Foster, who passed the work off as her own.
Read Foster's full essay here.

"My heart sank into my stomach. All the hard work, all the sleepless nights I had endured was playing back in my head as I read this article written by a woman I didn't even know," Curry told BV Buzz. "Why did I feel so connected to this article? Suddenly, it came to me. It was my work! It was my work, my voice, but in her words. I was frozen. Tears began rolling down my face as I read line after line after line. I couldn't believe it. The idea that someone could gain notoriety from an issue that I first brought to the forefront is mindboggling. People were praising her for tackling an issue that had never been exposed. Hello?!? I wrote the book on it and started it years ago. The only difference between her article and my book is she used 'dark-skinned' and I used 'Black.'" READ MORE...