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A hearse carrying the American flag-draped casket of Rep. John Lewis, stopped at Black Lives Matter Plaza in Washington, D.C. before heading to the U.S. Capitol where he will lie in state.

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Screengrab: ABC News

His son was given the Black Lives Matter street sign to mark the moment. Crowds stood along the road to watch Lewis's hearse pass by.

Lewis died after a yearlong battle with cancer on July 17 at age 80.

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His motorcade landed at Andrews Air Force base before making stops at historic sites in D.C., including the African American Museum.

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On Sunday, Lewis' hearse crossed over the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama on the second day of remembrance for the late civil rights leader.

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Lewis once said one of the proudest moments in his life was seeing Barack Obama sworn in as president in January 2009.

Lewis's long journey for equality will end with his funeral at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia on Thursday, July 30.

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Civil rights leader and U.S. congressman John Lewis passed away on Friday after a battle with cancer. He was 80.

Lewis, a member of the U.S. House of Representatives and a key figure in the civil rights movement in the 1960s, passed away a year after confirming he was battling stage four pancreatic cancer.

He was a Democrat, who represented a majority Black district covering most of Atlanta, Georgia.

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Lewis, left, is pictured with (L-R) civil rights leader C.T. Vivian, Reverend Martin Luther King Jr., and Lester McKinnie at Fisk University, an HBCU in Nashville on May 05, 1964. Rev. C.T. Vivian died this week in Atlanta at age 95.

Lewis was one of the 'Big Six' civil rights leaders, which included Martin Luther King, Jr., and he helped organize the historic 1963 March on Washington.

Upon news of his death on July 17, representatives from civil rights group the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) tweeted that they were "deeply saddened," noting: "His life-long mission for justice, equality and freedom left a permanent impression on our nation and world. The NAACP extends our sincerest condolences to his family, and we send prayers of comfort and strength to all."

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Blood-splattered Freedom Riders, John Lewis (left) and James Zwerg (right) stand together after being attacked and beaten by pro-segregationists in Montgomery, Alabama on May 20, 1961.

In a statement, former President Barack Obama said he had spoken with Lewis after a virtual town hall with a group of activists following the death of George Floyd.

Obama added that Lewis could not have been prouder of their efforts, writing, "a new generation standing up for freedom and equality".

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"Not many of us get to live to see our own legacy play out in such a meaningful, remarkable way. John Lewis did," he said. "And thanks to him, we now all have our marching orders - to keep believing in the possibility of remaking this country we love until it lives up to its full promise."

The White House praised Lewis' legacy on Twitter, and Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds ordered flags at half-staff in honor of Lewis.

President Trump, who arrived at his Virginia golf course around 9:15 a.m. Saturday -- minutes after Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany tweeted about Lewis, did not acknowledge the civil rights leader's death on Twitter.

Lewis' death comes a week after a U.S. Congresswoman prematurely tweeted that he had died on July 11.

"It's only rumors," Michael Collins told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. "He is resting comfortably at home."

Congresswoman Alma S. Adams, who initially tweeted Lewis had died, apologized for her error.

"We deeply regret a previous tweet based on a false news report." According to AJC, "a blog that focuses on news about historically black colleges & universities" also falsely reported that Lewis was dead on July 11.

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Photos: Getty Images/Instagram

Angela Stanton-King, who is running for Rep. John Lewis's Congressional seat, criticized Dwyane Wade for exploiting his gender confused child Zaya Wade.

Stanton-King, a best-selling author and former reality TV star, was recently granted a full pardon by President Trump in February, after serving a 6-month home confinement for a white collar crime.

Zaya, who was born a boy named Zion Malachi Airamis Wade, believes he is a girl. The 12-year-old made his red carpet debut at a charity event in Los Angeles, alongside Wade and his wife Gabrielle Union.

Union, 47, posted a video of the boy strutting the red carpet in an overtly provocative manner that many saw as inappropriate behavior for a minor child.
 

Stanton-King, 53, was among the critics who voiced their concern that the Wades are exploiting the child.

"PEDOPHILIA" she wrote above a photo of Zaya. "Gay means Men having sex with men. If you wouldn't want your 12 yr old daughter advertising that she enjoys sex with men/boys why your 12 yr old son? This is confusion, pedophilia, and sexual exploitation wrapped up in acceptance."

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Zaya's supporters among the LGBQ and T communities reacted swiftly, labeling Stanton-King "homophobic and transphobic". She followed up with another tweet:

"I am a woman that loves men and appreciates masculinity. We need our men. We need our sons. We need our brothers. Our men are not women and Our boys are not girls."

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Screenshot: CBS News

CBS News issued a sincere apology on Monday night for mixing up photos of the late Congressman Elijah Cummings and U.S. Rep. John Lewis, who announced he has stage 4 pancreatic cancer.

The mixup occurred on Monday's broadcast of CBS Evening News. A photograph of Cummings was mistakenly identified as Lewis. Cummings died of natural causes on Oct. 17, at age 68.

"Tonight on the 6:30 p.m. ET broadcast of the CBS Evening News, one photograph was misidentified as Congressman John Lewis. We have replaced the photo in all broadcasts and platforms. We deeply regret the error," CBS tweeted.

News of Lewis' cancer diagnosis prompted reactions from celebrities and lawmakers on social media.

Lewis, 79, said he will continue to serve in the House of Representatives while undergoing chemotherapy treatment for his cancer.

The civil rights leader once marched alongside Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. to fight for the freedom of Black people to vote in U.S. elections.

But on Sunday, Lewis announced he is in the biggest fight of his life.

"I have been in some kind of fight - for freedom, equality, basic human rights - for nearly my entire life," he said.

"I have never faced a fight quite like the one I have now."

Lewis added: "I have a fighting chance."

Pancreatic cancer is one of the few cancers that can go undetected until it is too far advanced to treat.

President Trump Addresses The Nation In His First State Of The Union Address

Members of the Congressional Black Caucus staged a silent protest during President Donald Trump's first State of the Union Address to Congress in Washington D.C. on Tuesday.

The Black Caucus members wore vibrant African kente cloth and black clothing to protest President Trump's infamous "shithole" comments about developing third world countries.

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Artist and photographer Freddy O poses with Congressman John Lewis at the African-American Heritage Arts Festival on Saturday. Fred is holding a print of his original artwork titled "I Can Dance". Rap artist Gorilla Zoe and Rico Brooks of Block Ent stopped by on Friday. The Heritage Arts Festival at Underground Atlanta ends tonight at 9 PM.

SR community member ATLien stopped by to purchase artwork from Freddy O! ATLien also runs the StraightFromTheA blog so go check her out!

One of Atlanta's more famous artists Selma Glass (right) sold prints of her artwork which is in demand.

Rep. John Lewis posed with artist Addison who created that Tupac artwork on his shirt

Tiyonda poses with Freddy O after purchasing a print.

The Newton family stopped by to check out Fred's work



Special thanks to all who stopped by and purchased Fred's work! To purchase Freddy O's artwork, please visit FreddyO.com or click here.

Photos by Sandra Rose