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Jordan Peele released the gory first trailer for his thriller 'Candyman'. The MGM/Universal Pictures remake was released on Thursday and tells the story of an artist fixated on finding a mysterious hook-handed killer, who appears when his name is repeated 5 times.

Jordan's version of Candyman is set in 1992 in Chicago's notorious Cabrini-Green housing projects. The last of the buildings that comprised Cabrini-Green Homes was demolished in March 2011.

The area where the projects once stood is now a landscape of gleaming high-rise buildings and upscale townhouses on the gentrified Near North Side of Chicago.

According to urban legend, "Candyman" is summoned when anyone repeats his name 5 times in a mirror.

"The urban legend is, if you say his name five times while looking in the mirror, he appears in the reflection and it kills you," says Yahya Abdul-Mateen II, who plays artist Anthony McCoy.

Candyman's murderous rampage begins when a group of girls says his name five times in a mirror and are promptly murdered.

McCoy becomes obsessed with finding out if the Candyman is real. He takes photos around the old Cabrini-Green neighborhood, basing his art exhibit on the elusive slasher, as bodies begin piling up.
 

Photo by FayesVision/WENN.com

Award-winning comedians Keegan-Michael Key, left, and Jordan Peele, aka Key & Peele, tackle the controversy surrounding American directors casting Black British actors in American movie roles.

Ironically, director Jordan Peele cast a British actor, Daniel Kaluuya, in his critically acclaimed movie "Get Out".

Actor Samuel L. Jackson questioned why Peele cast Kaluuya in Get Out. Others point out that British actress Naomie Harris was nominated for an Oscar for Moonlight. And British actor Chiwetel Ejiofor earned an Academy Award nomination for his role in 12 Years a Slave.

The film Queen & Slim, which opened in theaters on Thanksgiving Eve, featured British actors - Kaluuya and Jodie Turner-Smith - in the lead roles.

In this video, Peele and his comedic partner Keegan-Michael Key explain why American directors choose British actors over Black American actors.