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Louisville PD

Breonna Taylor's boyfriend Kenneth Walker implicated her as the shooter when three Louisville cops burst into her apartment to serve a no-knock drug warrant in March.

Police were there serving a no-knock warrant stemming from taped jailhouse conversations between Taylor and her ex-boyfriend, Jamarcus Glover, who was the target of a narcotics investigation.

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Louisville PD

In one audio of a jailhouse call, Glover tells someone he and Taylor hadn't seen each other in two months.

Walker's words were captured on a police body camera after Taylor was killed in a hail of bullets.

About a minute into the video clip, when an officer asks which one of them fired at cops, Walker says, "It was her. She was scared."

But civil rights attorney Lee Merritt claims Walker misspoke, and that the tape will prove beneficial in a potential federal case against the cops who killed Taylor.

Merritt joined TMZ on "TMZ Live" Thursday to discuss what Walker said to Louisville cops on the scene in the chaotic moments after the deadly raid.

The video footage is part of a cache of documents released by Louisville police on Thursday. The material includes 250 videos, more than 4,000 pages of documents, and photographs that show Taylor and Walker holding an assortment of guns.

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Louisville PD

One social media photo that shows Taylor and Walker holding guns is tagged "Partners in Crime."

In one video, Walker repeatedly tells cops he and Taylor didn't know that the invaders breaking into their apartment was police.

Merritt says Walker's words may create some doubt as to who fired the shot that hit Louisville PD officer Jonathan Mattingly in the thigh -- severing an artery.

But he adds the video also shows Walker was very emotional and under intense duress.

Since the night of the raid, Merritt says Walker has insisted he's the one who fired his legally - owned 9mm handgun.

Although the grand jury did not indict any of the officers for killing Taylor ... Merritt says they're still pushing for federal charges against all three cops.
 

Adriana M. Barraza/WENN.com

Charles Barkley suggests Breonna Taylor would still be alive if she had better judgment when choosing boyfriends.

The NBA legend faced public backlash on Thursday night when he said on "Inside the NBA" that "we do have to take into account that her boyfriend did shoot at the cops and shot a cop."

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Barkley said Kenneth Walker's alleged drug dealings put Taylor in direct danger. Taylor, 26, was killed on March 13 when three plainclothes police served a no-knock warrant at her apartment looking for an ex-boyfriend, who was already in jail on drug charges.

Walker shot at the intruders, striking one officer in the thigh. The cops returned fire, killing Taylor who was standing in a hallway.

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"So, like I said, even though I'm really sad she lost her life, I don't think this is something we can put in the same situation as George Floyd or Ahmaud Arbery," Barkley said, referring to unarmed Black men who were killed by police in America.

A witness told a Grand Jury this week that the officers identified themselves before taking the apartment door down. But Taylor and Walker, who were in bed when the police beat on their door, probably did not know they were officers.

Twitter users disagreed with Barkley's assessment.

@ItsaLearning tweeted:

"No, #charlesbarkley, he shot at intruders. These intruders, who happened to be Police, did not identify themselves. He had every right to defend himself and Breonna against whoever was breaking into his house unannounced."

And @ChatonsWorld wrote:

"He's misinformed. Her boyfriend shot at intruders. Nobody knew they were the police because they didn't announce themselves. Witnessing what happens when everybody thinks they need to share their opinion..."

Barkley also called for police reforms over defunding the police, since the Black community depends on the police for their safety.

"Who are black people supposed to call Ghost Busters when we have crime in our neighborhood? We need to stop the defund or abolish the police crap," he said.

A Grand Jury returned an indictment against one of the officers, Brett Hankison, who lost his job after the shooting. There were no charges directly related to Taylor's death.

On Thursday, Majic 107.5 host Ryan Cameron took phone calls from outraged listeners in Atlanta, who commented on the Louisville Metro Police Department "losing" the original no-knock warrant that set the tragedy in motion.

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Family handout

Only one out of three Louisville police officers was charged in the shooting death of Breonna Taylor.

The three officers were serving a no-knock drug warrant at Taylor's apartment on March 13 when Taylor's boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, opened fire on them, hitting one of the cops in the thigh.

The officers returned fire, killing Taylor, who was shot multiple times. The Grand Jury heard from a witness who said the officers announced themselves before breaching the front door and entering the apartment.

They also heard that Taylor was not killed in her bed as was originally reported by the news media. She was standing in a hallway when she was fatally shot 5 times.

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Louisville Metro PD

Brett Hankison (pictured left), who was fired in June, was charged with three felony counts of wanton endangerment. Bail was set at $15,000 and a warrant was issued for his arrest.

Two other officers involved in the shooting, Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly (center) and Detective Myles Cosgrove (right), were justified in their use of force, state Attorney General Daniel Cameron said at a press conference Wednesday.

Louisville police were under a state of emergency before a Grand Jury announced the single indictment on Wednesday.

In anticipation of Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron's announcement, Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer invoked a 72-hour curfew, effective Wednesday night, from 9 p.m. to 6:30 a.m.

Last week, Fischer announced the city agreed to a $12 million with Taylor's family that included police reforms.

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The family of Breonna Taylor is losing confidence in the Louisville prosecutor's office after news leaked of a plea deal offered to her ex-boyfriend.

The family's attorney Ben Crump appeared on "TMZ Live" Tuesday to discuss the shocking news about local prosecutors trying to smear Breonna by falsely claiming she was a drug trafficker.

Unfounded rumors have spread that Breonna's boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, used her apartment as a stash house for drugs. But no drugs were found in her apartment after she was shot multiple times and killed by three undercover police officers in March.

Walker opened fire on the officers - wounding one - when they executed a no-knock search warrant at Breonna's home on March 13. He initially believed the officers were home invaders.

Walker was arrested on attempted murder and drug charges, which were later dropped and he was released.

The plea deal required Walker to implicate Breonna as a willing participant in his drug activities.

Crump says he's not buying prosecutors' claim the plea deal was merely a draft written early on in negotiations. He tells TMZ it's just another piece of evidence that local authorities were trying to cover up Breonna's killing to protect the police.

Crump says the plea deal proves they were out to sully Breonna's character and that her family doubts Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron will seek justice for Breonna.

Crump tells TMZ, Breonna's family is losing faith in the process, because Cameron, a Black Republican, still has not announced charges against the officers involved in Breonna's killing.

Crump insists the family only wants one thing -- equal treatment under the law.

Meanwhile, Walker has filed a lawsuit seeking monetary damages from the City of Louisville and the Louisville Metro Police for assault, battery, false arrest and imprisonment, malicious prosecution, abuse of process and negligence.