BACKGRID

Rapper DaBaby is in legal trouble again. A 64-year-old homeowner filed a lawsuit against the troubled rapper after he was beaten and had a tooth knocked out during a music video shoot at his rental home.

An associate of Dababy is accused of beating up 64-year-old homeowner Gary Pagar after he showed up at his rental property to stop the rapper's music video shoot on December 2nd.

Pagar agreed to rent his mansion to DaBaby for "a private vacation," but he accused the rapper of violating the terms of the rental agreement by having more than 40 people at the mansion and using the property to shoot a music video with a full commercial film crew.

Pagar was monitoring his rental home via surveillance cameras when he spotted the rapper filming a music video on his property.

According to BACKGRID, the lawsuit claims that DaBaby and his associates "beat, punched, spat on, threatened, shoved, and robbed Mr Pagar" at his LA home on December 2, 2020.

BACKGRID

Among the guests at the house was YouTube star-turned-boxer Jake Paul. Video of the confrontation shows one of Dababy's associates identified as DOE 1 throwing Pagar to the ground without warning as he walked up his driveway and punching him.

Jake Paul, who is believed to have been participating in the video, can be seen observing the fracas in a red convertible Ferrari a few feet away.

DaBaby, who was a passenger in the Ferrari, is seen standing outside the car while watching the beatdown.

BACKGRID

DaBaby and his artist, Stunna 4 Vegas, eventually pulled the thug off of Pagar, but only so they could continue to "taunt, threaten and punch Pagar" himself, according to court documents.

DaBaby is accused of stealing Pagar's cellphone by force, chasing him into the house and threatening him to not call the police and punching him.

Pagar lost a tooth as a result of the attack. When the group was told that police were on their way, they "fled the scene leaving behind a damaged house and stealing valuable kitchenware as they left."

According to the documents, the rental was agreed at a total fee of $43,706. Pagar is suing for $117,910.48 to include damages to the property, excessive trash, broken foyer sculpture, stolen iPhone and various damages to upholstery and floor.

No charges have been filed.

Below are clips from the music video filmed inside the rental home.
 

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Rapper Tip "T.I." Harris and his wife, R&B singer Tameka "Tiny" Harris have denied accusations of drugging, kidnapping and sex abuse made by as many as 30 women.

Over the weekend, New York-based attorney Tyrone A. Blackburn sent letters to federal prosecutors in two states calling for a criminal investigation into the allegations.

In the letters, Blackburn accused the Atlanta power couple of "a myriad of allegations of forced drugging, kidnapping, rape, and intimidation in at least two states, including California and Georgia."

Blackburn filed a defamation lawsuit against T.I. and Tiny on behalf of Atlanta entrepreneur Sabrina Peterson, who previously accused T.I. of putting a gun to her head during an argument in 2009.

T.I. has retained his friend, high-powered criminal defense attorney Steve Sadow to represent him and his wife.

On Monday, Sadow said in a statement that T.I. and Tiny "deny in the strongest possible terms these unsubstantiated and baseless allegations" and he called the lawsuit a "shakedown" for money.

At a virtual press conference on Monday, Blackburn said the anonymous women aren't looking for money.

"They're seeking justice... These women have never put forth a request for money. They've never asked for money. Steve Sadow, maybe he misspoke... I didn't ask him for a dollar and from what I got from the conversations we had from the emails, they were very, very interested in killing this story and these claims. They didn't want this to come out."

Rumors of T.I. and Tiny's drug-fueled orgies have circulated on blogs and social media for years.

T.I. himself confirmed the rumors in a video response to Peterson's allegations in January.

"Uh, what we not going to do is open up the door to my bedroom," he said in the 8-minute video uploaded to Instagram.

"But I will say this, whatever we ever have done, has been done with consensual adults who into what we into and like what we like. If we want something, we know exactly where to go get it. We've never forced anybody, we've never drugged anybody against their will, we've never held anybody against their will. We've never made anybody do anything. We never sexually trafficked anything. I ain't never raped nobody, never raped nobody."

In a recent episode of T.I.'s podcast series, "ExpediTIously," the soft-spoken Sadow said he draws the line at representing sexual predators, since those cases are the most difficult to defend morally.

Watch T.I.'s interview with Sadow below.
 

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VLUV / Splash News

Over the weekend a NY-based attorney asked prosecutors in two states to investigate allegations of drugging and sex abuse against power couple Tip "T.I." Harris and Tameka "Tiny" Harris.

New details have emerged about the scandalous allegations made against the 40-year-old rapper and his 45-year-old R&B singer wife.

VLUV / Splash News

MTO News has learned that one of the female accusers said TI's pal, rapper Nelly (pictured 2nd from left), sexually abused her.

According to documents obtained by MTO, in 2014, TI and Tiny forced a woman to have sexual intercourse with rapper Nelly against her will.

Nelly, 46, recently settled a lawsuit by a different woman who claimed that he sexually assaulted her on his tour bus.

Nelly, a Grammy Award-winning rapper, is best known for his 2002 rap hit "Hot in Herre." His 2000 album Country Grammar sold over 8 million copies.

Nelly was dropped as spokesman for Honey Nut Cheerios following the allegations of sex assault.

The latest allegations may threaten his partnership with PepsiCo's Lay's Flamin' Hot chips.
 

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Instagram, Getty Images

Rapper T.I. and his wife Tiny were hit with a defamation lawsuit by Sabrina Peterson, the longtime family friend who claimed he put a gun to her head in 2009.

Peterson sued Clifford Joseph Harris, Jr., 40, and his wife, Tameka "Tiny” Harris, 45, for using their social media platforms to smear her good name.

According to legal documents obtained by TMZ, Peterson claims she got into an argument with her former friend, T.I., who then put a gun to her head and told her, "B*tch I'll kill you."

After Peterson, 42, went public with the allegations in January, Tameka posted a photo of T.I. posing with Peterson's 8-year-old son.

Peterson claims Tameka exposed her son to "vitriol and danger."

The post, which has since been deleted, sparked rumors that the boy was fathered by T.I.

Prince Williams/WireImage

T.I. and Tiny's high-powered attorney, Steve Sadow, tells TMZ they "deny in the strong possible terms these unsubstantiated and baseless allegations."

Sadow added, "These allegations are nothing more than the continuation of a sordid shakedown campaign that began on social media." He said T.I. and Tiny "implore everyone not to be taken in by these obvious attempts to manipulate the press and misuse the justice system."

In related news, a NY-based attorney sent letters to federal prosecutors in two states asking them to investigate allegations of drugging and sex abuse lodged by at least 11 women.

Attorney Tyrone A. Blackburn told the New York Times that the women were drugged, raped or sexually assaulted by the Harrises or those in their inner circle of friends and associates.

Michel Dufour/WireImage

Millions of Americans face eviction when the federally mandated moratorium on evictions expires in March. Former Vogue magazine editor-at-large Andre Leon Talley says he is among them.

Talley, 72, says he's being evicted from his colonial New York mansion in a messy rent battle with former Manolo Blahnik CEO, George Malkemus, who Talley owes $500k in back rent.

Talley claims Malkemus originally bought the home for him for just over $1 million in 2004 -- and that he is the rightful owner.

He now claims that Malkemus wants to evict him from the 11-room mansion in White Plains, NY, so he can sell it at a profit.
 

Talley said there is no lease agreement on the home and that he made "episodic payments" over time based on his income.

He said he had a "gentlemen's agreement" to transfer the title of the home to him after he paid back the purchase price.

In court documents obtained by the NY Post, Talley claims Malkemus and his life partner Anthony Yurgaitis agreed that Talley would exclusively own, occupy and care for the home. "It was agreed and always understood that Talley would, over time, 'pay off' the balance of the purchase price paid by the defendants at which point title would then formally be transferred to Talley," his court documents say.

He now claims that Malkemus and Yurgaitis are pressuring him to move out so they can sell it for their own profit.

"The timing and amount of these episodic payments were based on Talley's cash flow... Talley never made these payments to the Defendants on a monthly basis, and was not asked to."

In their eviction papers, Malkemus and Yurgaitis allege the former Vogue editor owes them $515,872 in back rent.

But Talley says he paid $1,075,588 by January 2020, and that he made the $120,000 down payment when the house was originally purchased. He also says he invested more than $200,000 for home improvements over the years.

In his lawsuit, Talley is demanding that he be allowed to stay in the property and that the title be transferred in his name.

An attorney for Malkemus and Yurgaitis said he is preparing a counterclaim. "Malkemus and Yurgaitis are the record owners of the house and want to sell it," the attorney said.

Eugene Gologursky/WireImage

Talley was appointed creative director of Vogue by Anna Wintour back in 1983. In his memoir, he said his once close relationship with the Vogue editor-in-chief was over.

He officially retired from editing in 2014.

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Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call

The NAACP is suing former President Donald Trump for violating the Ku Klux Klan act by allegedly inciting riots in the nation's capitol on Jan. 6.

"If we don't put a check on the spread of domestic terrorism, it will consume this nation and transform it to something that none of us recognize," said NAACP President Derrick Johnson in an interview. "We must, as a nation, prevent the spread of this type of boldness where [insurrectionists] will go to our U.S. Capitol and seek an act of treason."

According to Politico, the NAACP, Mississippi Rep. Bennie Thompson and civil rights law firm Cohen Milstein Sellers & Toll filed a lawsuit against Trump, his personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani and two white supremacist groups, following Trump's historic impeachment acquittal on insurrection charges.

The lawsuit, filed Tuesday morning in a Washington, DC courtroom, alleges that Trump and Giuliani collaborated with pro-Trump groups the Proud Boys and Oath Keepers to incite riots and overthrow the United States government.

The lawsuit claims Trump and his supporters conspired to keep Congress from certifying the results of the 2020 presidential election.

The plaintiffs claim Trump's remarks during his "Save America" rally "mobilized and directed insurrectionists to storm the Capitol building."

The lawsuit also alleges, Giuliani called congressional lawmakers individually, asking them to try to "slow down" the Electoral College vote count on Jan. 6.

Trump was acquitted of all charges in a historic second impeachment trial in the U.S. Senate. All 50 Democrats and 7 Republicans voted guilty, but 67 votes are required to convict.

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Rapper Offset is being sued by a luxury car dealership for reportedly losing one of their Bentley automobiles.

Platinum Transportation Group in Los Angeles gave the Migos rapper every opportunity to return a Bentley he rented in 2020. But, so far, Offset has failed to deliver the vehicle.

The exotic car dealership filed a lawsuit against Offset, according to documents obtained by TMZ.

PTG executives claim they rented a 2020 Bentley Bentayga to Offset for a couple days. The rapper asked for an extension of his contract and the terms were extended until late July.

But, after his lease was up on July 25th, Offset stopped making the rental payments.

PTG contacted him, and they were surprised to learn that he no longer had the car in his possession.

The dealership filed a police report declaring the luxury vehicle stolen.

It's not every day that a rapper losses a Bentley. So far, no charges have been filed.

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YouTube

A Louisiana woman who sprayed Gorilla Glue in her hair is suing the maker of Gorilla Glue after emergency room staff were unable to remove the hardened adhesive.

Tessica Brown went viral after she published a TikTok video complaining that her hair was stiff as a board after using Gorilla Glue adhesive spray as holding hairspray.

Sources tell TMZ that Brown spent 22 hours in the emergency room at St. Bernard Parish Hospital, in Chalmette, Louisiana, where staff used acetone, the ingredient in nail polish remover, in a failed attempt to remove the superglue.

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YouTube, Instagram

The source said the acetone burned her scalp and softened the glue to a sticky and gooey consistency before it hardened right back up again. She lost quite a bit of hair during the procedure.

Brown was given nail polish remover pads and a bottle of sterile water to take home. She was told to keep trying to remove the glue at home.

All other remedies failed to remove the glue -- and now Brown is in danger of going bald.

The source tells TMZ Brown retained a lawyer to discuss her options and to determine if she has a legal case against Gorilla Glue.

The product label warns against using the superglue in eyes, on skin (including the scalp) or clothing.

But Brown claims the label was "misleading" and didn't specifically state that the spray can't be used on hair.

Brown claims she thought the spray would be safe to use on her hair because the label said "multi-use."

A GofundMe page raised $9,000 for hair weave products and wigs for Brown who will probably lose all of her hair.
 

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Subway's public relations team rushed to get ahead of a potential PR disaster from a lawsuit claim that the franchise serves mystery meat to its customers.

A lawsuit filed by two plaintiffs in California claims an independent laboratory tested a Subway tuna fish sandwich and found the sandwich did not contain tuna or even fish.

"The products are made from a mixture of various concoctions that do not constitute tuna, yet have been blended together by Defendants to imitate the appearance of tuna," the lawsuit alleged. "Defendants identified, labeled and advertised the products as 'tuna' to consumers, when in fact they were not tuna."

The news prompted rampant speculation that Subway cuts corners by serving dog, cat or even human flesh that are cheaper by the pound than wild-caught tuna from the sea.

"These claims are meritless," a Subway spokesperson said in a statement to MSN's Insider. "Tuna is one of our most popular sandwiches. Our restaurants receive 100% wild-caught tuna, mix it with mayonnaise and serve on a freshly made sandwich to our guests."

Subway's spokesman claims a serving of tuna contains only skipjack and yellowtail tuna from fisheries.

The spokesperson added: "Subway will vigorously defend itself against these and any other baseless efforts to mischaracterize and tarnish the high-quality products that Subway and its franchisees provide to their customers, in California and around the world, and intends to fight these claims through all available avenues if they are not immediately dismissed."

In 2020, Subway lost a lawsuit in an Irish court that ruled Subway sandwich rolls could not be legally defined as "bread" because of the high sugar content.

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Subway

Most people who order tuna sandwiches from Subway restaurants expect the sandwich to contain some fish in the ingredients.

But a new federal lawsuit claims analysis of Subway tuna sandwiches finds the ingredients do not contain tuna or even fish.

"We found that the ingredients were not tuna and not fish," said one of two attorneys representing two plaintiffs in the lawsuit in an email to The Washington Post.

The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, claimed the company intentionally made "false and misleading representations about tuna being used as an ingredient."

The lawsuit does not explain what's in the Subway tuna sandwiches.

"As independent testing has repeatedly affirmed, the Products are made from anything but tuna," the lawsuit states. "On the contrary, the Products are made from a mixture of various concoctions that do not constitute tuna, yet have been blended together by Defendants to imitate the appearance of tuna."

Subway denied the claims that the sandwiches don't contain real tuna.

According to Subway's website, the tuna sandwich contains "flaked tuna blended with creamy mayo then topped with your choice of crisp, fresh veggies."

There simply is no truth to the allegations in the complaint that was filed in California,' a company spokesperson told DailyMail.com.

"Subway delivers 100 per cent cooked tuna to its restaurants, which is mixed with mayonnaise and used in freshly made sandwiches, wraps and salads that are served to and enjoyed by our guests," Subway claimed.

"The taste and quality of our tuna make it one of Subway's most popular products and these baseless accusations threaten to damage our franchisees, small business owners who work tirelessly to uphold the high standards that Subway sets for all of its products, including its tuna.