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The city of Louisville has agreed to a $12 million settlement with the family of Breonna Taylor. The settlement was announced on Tuesday.

Taylor, 26, was shot to death by police in her apartment six months ago. The deal will include police reforms including a requirement that commanders approve all search warrants before going before a judge, a source told the Courier Journal.

The news of a settlement comes as a grand jury prepares to review evidence in the case this week.

The largest amount Louisville has ever paid in a settlement was $8.5 million to Edwin Chandler in 2012, the Courier Journal reported.

Chandler was wrongfully imprisoned for more than nine years after Detective Mark Handy perjured himself.

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Musician Eddy Grant is suing President Donald Trump for using his 1982 hit song "Electric Avenue" during a campaign video clip.

The video features an animated train with Trump's campaign logo speeding through a town while Biden follows along in a railroad handcar.

Grant's song plays throughout the duration of the video, which ends with letters spelling out "Biden Train" falling off the screen.

"Electric Avenue" plays in the video clip, which Trump tweeted last month. The video clip garnered 13 million views through Tuesday afternoon.

The campaign removed the video, but the 72-year-old Guyanese-British singer-songwriter filed a lawsuit Tuesday, citing Trump for "continued to willfully and wrongfully infringing Plaintiffs' copyrights."

Grant's lawyer noted "substantial damage and irreparable harm has occurred and will continue to occur to my client and his reputation as an artist not affiliated in any way with your campaign."

The Trump campaign has received warnings and legal action after multiple demands to stop using copyrighted music by other musicians in his campaign rallies.
 

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Rappers Gucci Mane (right) and Foogiano (left) have been named in a wrongful death lawsuit over a fatal shooting during a concert at a South Carolina nightclub during the 4th of July weekend.

The administrator for the estate of Mykala Bell, a 23-year-old woman who was fatally shot during the concert, filed the lawsuit in Greenville County last week, editors at The Greenville News reported Monday.

According to legal papers, the mother of two was standing near the stage when gunfire broke out in the early hours of July 5 at Lavish Lounge where Foogiano was performing.

Security guard Clarence Sterling Johnson, 51, was also killed and eight others were injured in the melee.

Police charged a Georgia man Jarquez Kezavion Cooper, 22, in the shooting and said it appeared to be gang-related - but the new lawsuit alleges Foogiano, real name Kwame Brown, and his entourage were not patted down before they entered the club and were allowed inside with "deadly weapons".

The lawsuit adds that Gucci, real name Radric Delantic Davis, was "believed to be" a promoter for the concert, though it did not say whether he was present at the time of the shooting.

Cooper is also named, as well as the club's operating company, its owner and nearly a dozen other unspecified "owners, managers, operators, independent contractors, and/or security companies" accused of negligence for failing to provide adequate surveillance and security, and "permitting criminal activity," among other allegations.

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In a video posted to his Instagram feed shortly after the incident occurred, Foogiano, best known for hits "Molly (Baby Mama)" and "Finesser," insisted the shooting, "ain't my fault. I don't promote violence."

"I understand y'all in pain y'all hurting... but y'all just got to look to the situation," he said in the clip. "I ain't going to blame myself for something I didn't cause."

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) plans to stop calling the coronavirus an epidemic because of a major drop in deaths.

The death rate has fallen so low that "the percentage is currently at the epidemic threshold."

"Based on death certificate data, the percentage of deaths attributed to pneumonia, influenza or COVID-19 (PIC) decreased from 9.0% during week 25 to 5.9% during week 26, representing the tenth week of a declining percentage of deaths due to PIC," the CDC wrote on its website.

In a leaked memo in April, the CDC urged doctors to classify "probable" deaths as COVID-19-related.

The memo stated tests were not necessary to confirm COVID-related death. Doctors complained that the COVID-19 death rate was artificially inflated.

As a result of the CDC's memo, many family members were denied insurance payouts since insurance companies do not cover pandemic-related illnesses.

Families filed lawsuits against doctors and hospitals which effectively ended the false diagnoses and the COVID-19 death rate tumbled.
 

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XXXTentacion's mother, Cleopatra Bernard, responded to the $11 million lawsuit filed by the late rapper's half-brother, Corey Pack, who claims he is entitled to 25% of his brother's estate.

XXXTentacion was shot and killed by armed robbers outside a motorcycle dealership on June 18, 2018 in Deerfield Beach, Florida.

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Three suspects were arrested and charged in the rapper's death.

Pack filed the lawsuit in a Broward Court, Florida court last week, claiming the rapper's will left him 25% -- or $11 million -- from X's estate.

Pack claimed Bernard conspired with X's baby mama, Jenesis Sanchez, to deprive him of his inheritance.

Bernard responded to the lawsuit via a statement through her attorney on Friday afternoon.

"The lawsuit filed by XXXTentacion’s half-brother, Corey Pack against XXXTentacion’s mother, Cleopatra Bernard, is completely without merit. Contrary to the allegations of the complaint, a court has already determined that Corey Pack is entitled to nothing from XXXTentacion’s estate or trust. XXXTentacion's only child, and sole heir, is his son, Gekyume Onfroy. Any attempts by Corey Pack or his mother to take money from XXXTentacion’s only child or to extract money from XXXTentacion’s mother are completely without merit."

Edit: According to court records obtained by the New Times, Onfroy designated his mother as his personal representative. His trust names Bernard and his two brothers, Aiden Kerr and Corey Pack, as his beneficiaries.

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When rapper 2 Chainz and his business partner, Mychel "Snoop" Dillard, first opened Escobar restaurant in Atlanta, they forgot to secure permission for the use of the name from the family of notorious drug lord Pablo Escobar.

The family filed a lawsuit against the rapper over use of the name, and now
Escobar Inc. bosses are demanding no less than $10 million, claiming the hitmaker's two Escobar Restaurants in Atlanta violate federal law by using the Escobar name and likeness without permission.

The restaurants are decorated with large B&W posters of the smiling drug lord taken from his mugshot. The restaurant also sells t-shirts and other merchandise featuring the image.

According to TMZ, the family insists they own the licensing and trademark to Escobar's name and likeness.

They are also demanding an injunction blocking the use of the name and likeness at the restaurants.

2 Chainz has yet to comment.
 

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Atlanta PD

Two former Atlanta police officers who were terminated for tasing a couple of college students have filed lawsuits against Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms and Atlanta Police Chief Erika Shields.

Mark Gardner and Ivory Streeter filed lawsuits through their attorney on Monday, alleging their rights were violated and they were fired in violation of the city's code; without investigation, proper notice or a pre-disciplinary hearing, according to ABC News.

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theGrio.com

Gardner and Streeter were caught on viral video dragging 20-year-old Taniyah Pilgrim and 22-year-old Messiah Young out of their car and tasing them during the Atlanta riots.

The police pursued the students as they were driving home from the George Floyd protests after a citywide curfew - but the students said they had no idea that a 9 p.m. curfew was in effect.

Gardner and Streeter were charged with aggravated assault for tasing the students when they committed no crimes.

The fired officers want their jobs reinstated, as well as back pay and benefits and an apology from the mayor.
 

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The Department of Justice is not playing with blue states that refuse to reopen amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Governors in Georgia, South Carolina and Tennessee have vowed to reopen their states by Friday, April 24. Texas reopened on Monday, April 20. But Democratic governors and mayors are still resistant to reopening.

During an interview with conservative radio host Hugh Hewitt, Attorney General William Barr said the DOJ might join lawsuits filed by residents against blue states if they don't reopen fast enough.

Signaling that the lockdown was a massive mistake, Barr said, "We have to give businesses more freedom to operate in a way that's reasonably safe. To the extent that governors don't and impinge on either civil rights or on the national commerce - our common market that we have here - then we'll address that."

The moves comes as conservative business owners took to the streets to protest the forced lockdowns around the country. The CDC's flawed death toll prediction models have failed spectacularly, and the DOJ promised to look into draconian rules enforced by Democratic mayors and governors.

"We're looking carefully at a number of these rules that are being put into place," Barr said. "And if we think one goes too far, we initially try to jawbone the governors into rolling them back or adjusting them. And if they're not and people bring lawsuits, we file statement of interest and side with the plaintiffs."

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A Texas judge has denied a motion filed by Carl Crawford's 1501 record label to lift Megan Thee Stallion's restraining preventing him from blocking her album release on Friday.

Crawford, CEO of 1501 Certified Entertainment, filed an emergency motion on Wednesday to dissolve a temporary restraining order preventing him from blocking her music release.

Photo by Mike Zarrilli/Getty Images

The former Los Angeles Dodgers star argued that she had no right to take the label to court in the first place, because he still has an ironclad contract that she signed.

But District Court Judge Beau A. Miller denied Crawford's motion, leaving the restraining order in place.

The judge, who must have been swayed by Megan's ample ASSets, stated simply, "the album at issue may be dropped for distribution beginning March 6, 2020."

Judge Miller also turned his attention to music honcho J. Prince, who sent subtle threats to Jay-Z and Roc Nation via social media, putting them on notice that he won't tolerate them trying to shake down 1501.

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In an Instagram post on Wednesday, J. Prince called out New York labels for stealing artists, which he says is a common practice.

"This is the same technique of the culture vultures. I didn't allow this to happen to me when New York and LA record labels attempted to take my artists - so they labeled me as malicious for fighting back. I didn't allow it then so I damn sure ain't gonna allow it to happen to 1501 records or any other independent record labels that I'm associated with."

Prince addressed Megan directly for allegedly running to Roc Nation and turning against Crawford who put her on.

But the judge ordered J. Prince to refrain from making "threatening or retaliatory social media posts or threats against" Megan, her agents, or her representatives.

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The judge also slapped a gag order on Megan and Crawford, who both took to social media to air out their side in the grievance.

Both parties are prohibited from "communicating with the media concerning the underlying issues in this case without court approval."

In a tearful video on her Instagram stories on Sunday, Megan, whose real name is Megan Pete, complained the contract was one-sided and unfair when she signed it as a naive 20-year-old.

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But Crawford hit back, telling Billboard magazine that Megan is a fraud and a liar. He said she was not the innocent 20-year-old signing her first record deal.

He insists she was 23 when she signed, which makes her 28 now, not 25 as she claims.

"You wasn't 20, you were 23 years old. You was a grown up. You're just a liar," Crawford said.

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Megan Thee Stallion won a minor victory in court on Monday when a Texas judge granted a restraining order against her record label and its CEO, Carl Crawford, preventing him from blocking new music she plans to drop on Friday.

But Crawford is fighting back, and his 1501 Certified Entertainment wants an emergency court hearing on the matter.

According to TMZ, Crawford, 38, just filed a motion to dissolve the temporary restraining order. The label says she had no right to take them to court in the first place. He says he still has an ironclad contract in place that she signed. The judge must have been swayed by her heavenly body.

Photo by Adriana M. Barraza/WENN.com

In a tearful video on her Instagram stories on Sunday, Megan complained the contract was one-sided and unfair when she signed it as a naive 20-year-old.

But Crawford hit back, telling Billboard magazine that Megan is a fraud and a liar. He said she was not the innocent 20-year-old signing her first record deal.

He insists she was 23 when she signed, which makes her 28 now, not 25 as she claims.

"You wasn't 20, you were 23 years old. You was a grown up. You're just a liar," Crawford said.

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According to the court docs, obtained by TMZ, Crawford (pictured with ex-fiancee Evelyn Lozada) says Megan's contract is ironclad and he stipulates all disputes between her and the label must be handled in arbitration.

He also claims Megan is guilty of booking several gigs for $100,000 per gig without paying him his cut. And he is further annoyed that she plans to release new music on March 6 -- a violation of her contract.

In court docs, 1501 Certified says she can't drop new music without the label's approval, it's in her contract. Even if she wants out of the contract, it remains in place for now, and Crawford says he's exercising his contractual right to control distribution of her music.

He's demanding a hearing today in Harris County, Texas, so a judge can hear the label's side of the story before the music comes out on Friday.

Isaac Hayes' son, Isaac Hayes III, doubts Megan has the clout to prevail in her battle against her record label.

Issac also took a subtle dig at Jay-Z, who has a reputation for riding an artist's bandwagon when they're hot and popping.

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Former Major League Baseball star Carl Crawford is speaking out about his bitter contract dispute with rapper Megan Thee Stallion.

In an exclusive interview with Billboard magazine, Crawford said he hasn't spoken with his artist since August, and she owes him $2 million for his cut of her touring and merchandise proceeds.

Megan took to her Instagram stories on Sunday to tearfully vent about the unfair 360 contract she signed with Crawford's 1501 Certified Entertainment label.

"Nothing is true that she said. Me being greedy and taking money from her, that's crazy," Crawford tells Billboard. "I never tried to take nothing from her. The only thing we ever did was give, give, give.

"She's getting $100,000 a show and she don't want to pay up. That's what the issue was about. She signed with Roc Nation in August and decided she didn't wanna pay me no more."

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The up-and-coming rapper scored a viral hit "Hot Girl Summer" last year when she teamed up with Nicki Minaj and Ty Dolla $ign.

But despite the success of her record, she claimed that her label wouldn't allow her to drop any new music after she asked to renegotiate her contract for more money.

Megan won a legal victory in court on Monday when a Texas judge granted a restraining order against 1501 and its CEO, Crawford, preventing him from blocking the new music she plans to drop on Friday.

Photo by Lachlan Cunningham/Getty Images

The former Los Angeles Dodgers outfielder confessed he doesn't know the ins and outs of a recording contract. He trusted his business associate, T. Farris, and Megan's late mother, Holly Thomas, to write the contract for Megan.

"You mean to tell me, you, your mama and your lawyer didn't read over that stuff every time? Stop lying," he said.

"Her mom did the contract. I'm new to this business. I let this guy T. Farris run my whole business, because I knew absolutely nothing about it. Zero.

Crawford accused Megan of lying about her age (a common tactic in the music business). He said she was 23 when she signed with his label, which would make her 28 now, not 25 as she claims.

"You wasn't 20, you were 23 years old. You was a grown up. You're just a liar," Crawford said.

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Crawford disputed Megan's claim that she only received $10,000 up front when she signed her contract. Or that she only received $15,000 for a billion music streams.

He said Megan signed a second deal with 300 Entertainment and he received a check for $200,000, out of which he paid Megan $50,000.

"How she been paid $15,000? As soon as we signed to 300 [Entertainment], I wrote her a check for $50,000, and it's signed with her name on the check. We can show you the proof... I got all my receipts."

He said Megan and Farris signed a management deal with Jay-Z and Roc Nation, then sent goons to his office in Houston, Texas to intimidate him.

Crawford said he gave Megan a 60/40 deal that guarantees her 40% of her royalties. "What contract gives you parts of their masters and 40% royalties and that kind of stuff? Ask Jay-Z to pull one of his artists' first contracts, and let's compare it to what Megan got... I guarantee they won't ever show you that.

"They're holding the money, and they haven't paid me since August. She done over 15 shows. Y'all do the math. She gets $100,000 a show. She owe me, and I haven't recouped almost $2 million that we spent on her, building her up so that Roc Nation would wanna come."

He said Megan, Jay-Z and Roc Nation are taking food out of his children’s mouths.

"Where was Roc Nation at when we was grinding and riding around on them backstreets? Roc Nation's nowhere to be found. Soon as we spent our money, blow it up, now all of a sudden, these strangers and people you just met -- they introduce you to Beyonce and now we the devil?

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Crawford, 38, was once engaged to reality TV personality Evelyn Lozada, who gave birth to his son, Carl Leo Crawford, Jr, 6.

After Crawford was cut by the Dodgers in June 2016, he reportedly went into playboy mode, flying women out to his West Coast home and cheating shamelessly in front of the elder Lozada, 44.

The couple called off their engagement in August 2017 after dating for 4 years.

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Rappers Yo Gotti and Jay-Z have filed a second lawsuit against Mississippi prison officials on behalf of 152 inmates over the "abhorrent and barbaric" conditions prisoners suffer at Parchman Farm.

The lawsuit, filed on Wednesday, Feb. 26, against eight defendants including the Mississippi Department of Corrections. The lawsuit follows a similar one filed last month on behalf of 29 more inmates.

The latest suit details the "abhorrent conditions, abuse and constant violence, inadequate health care and mental health care, and overuse of isolation" prisoners at the facility, also known as Mississippi State Penitentiary, have had to endure over lack of funding and not enough staff.

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"The conditions of confinement at Parchman are so barbaric, the deprivation of health and mental health care so extreme, and the defects in security so severe, that the people confined at Parchman live a miserable and hopeless existence confronted daily by imminent risk of substantial harm in violation of their rights under the U.S. Constitution," the complaint states.

Additionally, the complaint states that the prisoners, who live in "medieval" conditions at the jail, are rarely able to obtain any medical help they require - leading to inmates "inserting their own catheters, treating their own stab wounds, vomiting up blood, teetering on the verge of diabetic comas, and suffering through seizures without medical care.

Even a broken neck can go without treatment at Parchman, with the inmate being left to suffer through his injury while sleeping on exposed, steel bedsprings with no mattress."

Following the first lawsuit filed in January, an investigation into the conditions at Parchman and three other Mississippi prisons was opened by the Department of Justice. That investigation is ongoing.

Source: WENN.com

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R&B crooner Usher teased his new single "Confessions Pt. 3" during a live set at the Cricket Lounge, where he previewed songs from his upcoming album.

The 41-year-old was the target of lawsuits from multiple women and one man, each accusing him of giving them herpes. The lawsuits were quietly settled out of court last year. The terms of the settlements - and whether any cash was paid out - were not disclosed.

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But a clip from his live set left his fans wondering if he's trying to tell them something. Usher seems to allude to a "sickness" on "Confessions Pt. 3".

    "Remember that time I was sitting up sick, couldn't sleep on the middle of the night? / And you said bae let me take you to the ER / I said 'Nah, Imma be alright / Well, the next day I found out from f*cking around that the sickness I had was life / And I was fixed with the decision to keep it / Knowing I had to get rid of it, rid of it, live with it / He don't know, I don't know, we had to deal with it."

The song concludes with: "That's the test to see if you're strong."

Then, addressing the audience directly, Usher says, "You realize what I just told you? You don't realize it, huh? Well, you can play it back."
 


 

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A Detroit man is suing a bank for calling the police when he went to deposit settlement checks from a race discrimination lawsuit.

Sauntore Thomas, 44, alleges TCF Bank accused him of check fraud because the bank couldn't verify checks he tried to deposit as part of his lawsuit settlement.

Thomas, who is Black, received an undisclosed amount from Enterprise Rent a Car to settle a May 2018 lawsuit.

He filed a lawsuit on Wednesday after what he calls a "hellish experience" being questioned by police in front of bank customers - while two more Detroit police officers guarded the door outside, the Detroit Free Press reported.

Thomas is seeking unspecified damages and an apology from TCF Bank. The bank claims it was only following protocol when there is a large deposit made.

The bank filed a police report alleging Thomas committed bank fraud. TCF Bank claims the watermark on the checks indicated the checks were fraudulent.

Thomas wasn't arrested and no charges were filed, the NY Daily News reported.

A spokesperson from the Livonia Police Department told the Free Press that the checks could not be verified because they weren't payroll checks.

An emailed copy of the settled lawsuit from Thomas' attorney, Deborah Gordon, didn't resolve the dispute, nor did conversations with Gordon, the cops and bank personnel.

"Obviously, assumptions were made the minute he walked in based on his race," attorney Gordon told the Free Press.

"It's unbelievable that this guy got done with a race discrimination case and he's not allowed to deposit the checks based on his case? It's absolutely outrageous."

Gordon, who is Caucasian, said "banking while Black" should not have been viewed as a crime.

"This is just another classic example of what it's like living your life as a Black male," she told BuzzFeed News. "The checks are for real. Why was there an issue? Why could you not verify them? You're a bank, after all - it's your job to verify checks."

The bank issued a swift apology for the experience Thomas had at their banking center. "Local police should not have been involved. We strongly condemn racism and discrimination of any kind," TCF Bank said in a statement to the Free Press.

"We take extra precautions involving large deposits and requests for cash and in this case, we were unable to validate the checks presented by Mr. Thomas and regret we could not meet his needs."

Thomas closed his account at TCF Bank and deposited the checks at another bank - where they cleared in 12 hours.

"I want to be vindicated," Thomas told the Free Press. He said he feared being arrested that day because he knows what happens to men with dark skin who don't toe the line.

"I feel very intimidated because I knew that if I would have gotten loud, they would have had me on the ground for disturbance of the peace," he said.

"I didn't give them any type of indication that I was getting upset. I wanted to make sure I stayed as levelheaded as possible, because I wasn't going to be the next person on the ground saying, 'I can't breathe.'"

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A second Kevin Spacey accuser has committed suicide. Ari Behn, 47, died by suicide the same day Spacey returned to YouTube in a bizarre Christmas video.

Behn, who was previously married to Norwegian princess Martha Louise, accused Spacey, 60, of reaching under a table and grabbing his genitals twice at a Nobel Prize concert in 2007. Behn would have been around 35 at the time of the alleged incident.

"I have a little #MeToo story about Kevin Spacey," Behn said in late 2017.

"We were having a nice chat where we spoke about theater and drama... After minutes, he said 'Hey, let's go out and have a cigarette,' then he grabbed me under the table right in the balls."

The news of Behn's death comes after Spacey posted a bizarre Christmas video on YouTube.

In the video, Spacey sits by a roaring fire while wearing a holiday sweater.

Speaking in the voice of his House of Cards character, Spacey said, "You didn't really think I was going to miss the opportunity to wish you a merry Christmas, did you? It's been a pretty good year and I'm grateful to have my health back and in light of that I've made some changes in my life and I'd like to invite you to join me."

Spacey concluded:

"The next time someone does something you don't like you can go on the attack but you can also hold your fire and do the unexpected, you can kill them with kindness.”

 

Behn's death marks the third passing of a person who accused Spacey of sexual assault.

Earlier this year, Linda Culkin, a nurse who accused Spacey of sexual battery against one of her patients, was hit by a car as she crossed an intersection.

Police said Culkin crossed while the light was green. The driver swerved to avoid her and hit another car head on. Both drivers were not seriously injured. Police did not file charges.

Months later, a middle-aged massage therapist who accused Spacey of sex assault when the man was a teenager died by suicide.

The man's attorney asked Spacey to give the family 90 days to grieve and to "substitute his estate," but Spacey filed a notice of death in court the next day.

Los Angeles prosecutors dropped the sexual battery case after the accuser died, and Massachusetts prosecutors also dropped the criminal case against Spacey.

On Nov. 8, 2017, former Boston news anchor Heather Unruh held a press conference in Boston, during which she tearfully accused Spacey of allegedly groping her then-18-year-old son. The incident allegedly occurred in July 2016 at the Club Carr restaurant on Nantucket Island.

The teenager said he texted his girlfriend while Spacey groped him. But Spacey's attorneys spent months trying to obtain the cell phone and copies of the text messages. A lawyer for the teen told prosecutors the phone was missing.

When Unruh turned over the cell phone to police in 2017, she admitted she deleted some of the text messages. On June 26, 2019, her son filed a lawsuit against Spacey, claiming emotional damages.

The lawsuit was dropped two weeks later "with prejudice", meaning it can't be filed again.

Since being accused of sex abuse, Spacey's movie projects have been canceled and his bookings have dried up.

The sex scandals have brought down power players like Harvey Weinstein, Bill Cosby, Adam Venit, Bryan Singer and Brett Ratner.