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Doctors are concerned about the effects of smoking marijuana among young people who are vulnerable to the coronavirus.

Weed smokers put themselves at risk of dying if they contract the coronavirus.

Weed smokers are among the COVID-19 high-risk categories and explains why more young people are succumbing to the virus in recent weeks.

Doctors say marijuana smoke weakens the heart muscles, putting weed smokers and vapers at higher risk of dying due to COVID-19. Doctors have previously linked weed smoking to deaths of young people who contract COVID-19.

"The American Heart Association recommends that people not smoke or vape any substance, including cannabis products, because of the potential harm to the heart, lungs and blood vessels," said Dr. Rose Marie Robertson, the deputy chief science and medical officer for the American Heart Association, in a statement.

Experts say anyone considering smoking mary jane recreationally should consult with their doctors first.

In addition to COVID-19 risk factor, doctors also found weed smoking has "the potential to interfere with prescribed medications" as well as "trigger cardiovascular conditions or events, such as heart attacks and strokes," said clinical pharmacologist Robert Page II.

"If people choose to use cannabis for its medicinal or recreational effects, the oral and topical forms, for which doses can be measured, may reduce some of the potential harms," Page said in a statement.

"It is also vitally important that people only use legal cannabis products because there are no controls on the quality or the contents of cannabis products sold on the street," he added.

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Mary Kay Letourneau, the schoolteacher who married a former student she was convicted of raping, has died from cancer. She was 58.

Letourneau was a 6th grade teacher at an elementary school in Burien, a suburb of Seattle, when she began an inappropriate sexual relationship with then-12-year-old Vili Fualaau in 1996.

A friend of Letourneau's then-husband alerted the authorities about the relationship. Police caught Letourneau with the boy in a parked minivan at a marina in Des Moines, WA. at 1:20 a.m. on June 19, 1996.

Letourneau, a mother of four, initially told police the boy was 18. Both were fully clothed at the time, but police suspected something of a sexual nature had occurred.

Back at the police station, Letourneau, then 34, said she was babysitting Fualaau and took him home after she and her husband had a fight.

Letourneau and Fualaau's first daughter was conceived about two months later.

Letourneau pleaded guilty to two counts of child rape and was sentenced to six months in jail and three years of sex offender treatment.

The jail sentence was suspended on the condition that she agreed not to contact her adolescent baby daddy.

By then, Letourneau's husband had filed for divorce and moved out of state with their four minor children.

The couple's second daughter was conceived in 1998, before Letourneau was sentenced to serve more than 7 years in prison for child rape.

After Letourneau's early release from prison in 2004, Fualaau, then 20, applied to the court for permission to see her. The couple was married in 2005.

In 2017, Fualaau, then 33, filed for a legal separation from Letourneau, 55.

Fualaau told the NY Post he still loved his wife and they were happy together. He said the separation was for business purposes "in order to sell cannabis."

He said the separation would make it easier for him to obtain a license to sell "cigaweed" - marijuana cigarettes.

"It's not necessarily what you think. When you want to get licensed, they do background checks on both parties," he told the New York Post. "If I decide to be a part of it, I have to be licensed, and I have to be vetted, and so does a spouse. She has a past. She has a history."

Fualaau worked as a DJ in the Washington area but he wanted to start his own business.
The couple's story was the subject of books and a movie on USA Network, titled "All-American Girl: The Mary Kay Letourneau Story."
 

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Snoop Dogg is not afraid of catching Coronavirus. He assured his fans that he has some lung function left after smoking weed like a chimney for most of his life.

The 48-year-old rapper recorded a P.S.A. video on his Instagram stories to demonstrate how long he can hold his breath without having coughing fits.

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The PSA was Snoop's effort to prove to his fans that he has some lung function left. He thinks holding his breath for 10 seconds is proof that he is healthy.

Snoop, who is best known for his platinum-selling debut rap album Doggystyle (1993), also had a message for his younger fans.

"Stay close to your loved ones. Stay hydrated," Snoop said in his video.

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People who smoke cigarettes or weed are most at risk if they contract the Coronavirus (Covid-19). The virus targets ACE2 enzymes in the lungs (and other organs) which it attaches to in order to infect human cells to make copies of itself.

A crucial lung process is the exchange of oxygen for carbon dioxide. People who smoke have less lung capacity and more damaged areas of their lungs where this crucial life process will not occur efficiently.

The CDC offers the following tips to avoid spreading the flu or Covid-19 virus to vulnerable elders like Snoop:

1. Wash your hands frequently with soap for at least 20 seconds
2. Don't touch your eyes, nose or mouth with unwashed hands
3. Avoid close contact with sick people
4. Stay home if you are sick
5. Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces such as door handles, refrigerator handles, etc.
 

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Media reports about the coronavirus (Covid-19) have caused widespread panic around the world. But health experts say the virus is only a danger to certain populations such as the elderly, people with chronic illnesses, and smokers.

Dr. Norman Swan is urging smokers to quit to avoid developing a fatal pneumonia if you catch the virus.

For most of us, the Covid-19 virus will cause mild symptoms such as cough, sore throat and a low-grade fever. But health experts warn the effects of nicotine and smoke inside the lungs makes smokers more vulnerable to the virus.

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People who smoke have weaker lungs because smoke is caustic and damages the fragile lining inside the lungs. If the lining of the lung is damaged, it causes the lungs to leak, prevents the exchange of oxygen and C02, and may require the patient to be placed on a ventilator.

Dr. Swan said smokers are particularly at risk of getting sick -- and dying.

"If you are a smoker, the lining of your lungs is more vulnerable and you're producing more of the (ACE2) receptors which the COVID-19 virus latches on to.

"So quit now -- there are plenty of resources around to help you [quit]."

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Professor Chris Whitby, Englands's chief medical officer, said: "For most respiratory infections, you worry about people who smoke a bit more. They're more likely to get it and their immune system is less good. If you are going to give up smoking, this is a very good moment to do it."

The CDC offers the following tips to avoid spreading the flu or Covid-19 virus:

1. Wash your hands frequently with soap for at least 20 seconds

2. Don't touch your eyes, nose or mouth with unwashed hands

3. Avoid close contact with sick people

4. Stay home if you are sick

5. Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces such as door handles, refrigerator handles, etc.

Iris Rowe

When a College Park SWAT team raided a drug den on Godby Road in South Fulton County on Monday, they found 2 suspected drug dealers, a stash of marijuana with a street value of $30,000, and an off-duty police officer who was apparently hanging out with the suspects.

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