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Brad Parscale, former campaign manager for President Donald Trump's 2020 re-election, was hospitalized after he threatened to harm himself on Sunday.

Ft. Lauderdale, Florida responded to a 911 call from Parscale's wife, Candice, who said Parscale was armed and threatened suicide. When police arrived on the scene in the affluent Seven Isles community, Parscale reportedly "barricaded" himself inside his home.

Fort Lauderdale Police Chief Karen Dietrich said Parscale was involuntarily committed to a psych ward under Florida's Baker Act, which allows police to commit people who are a danger to themselves or others.

She said he did not threaten police and he went "willingly" with police.

"We went out and it was very short. We went and got him help," Dietrich said, according to the South Florida Sun Sentinel.

Parscale's fall from grace began in June when he was outwitted by TikTok teenagers who registered online by the thousands to attend Trump's campaign rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Parscale embarrassed and humiliated his boss when he tweeted that he had received over 1 million requests for tickets to the Tulsa rally, but more than half the seats were empty at the 19,000-seat arena.

The teens took to TikTok to brag that they intentionally registered thousands of tickets online so Trump's supporters couldn't get tickets.

Parscale was also investigated for allegedly "mismanaging" over $40 million in Trump campaign funds.

More than $800,000 was spent on "boosting" Parscale's social media pages, and $39 million was transferred to two companies owned by Parscale.

On July 15, Trump tweeted that Parscale was demoted and would be replaced by Bill Stepien, but Parscale would continue to advise the campaign.

Parscale is currently serving as senior adviser for data and digital operations for Trump's 2020 presidential re-election campaign.

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Tamar Braxton has been transferred to a psychiatric hospital where she will receive "specialized" mental health therapy after she attempted to take her own life by swallowing a handful of pills last week.

The Blast reports the 43-year-old reality TV personality and singer is "alert and responsive" and speaking to her family and doctors.

According to The Blast, Tamar was moved to a mental health facility for treatment of her mental health issues.

"Out of respect for Tamar's privacy and that of her family, no additional information is available at this time," a source told the media outlet.

She was rushed to the hospital on Thursday after her boyfriend, David Adefeso, found her unconscious in their apartment at the Ritz Carlton Residences.

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In a letter that she sent to WeTv, Braxton, pictured with superstar sister Toni Braxton, called producers of her reality show "cruel" and she blamed them for ruining her family and making her suicidal.

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In her letter Braxton said her family was "in disarray" due to the show's producers.

"We fight with each other, we betray each other, and now we're physically assaulting each other — all happening because your show ['Braxton Family Values'] has chosen to show the absolute worst side of a strong, independent and successful African American family; a show that I created to showcase a strong Black Family as a beacon of hope for all the young black girls and boys out there; instead you coached and cajoled us into finding the worst in each other," Braxton wrote in the letter obtained by The Blast.

Braxton also blamed producers for revealing a dark secret that she never even told her mother.

"You dug up a secret I'd never shared with anyone, a secret I was so ashamed to talk about that I hid it even from my own mom: the fact that I had been assaulted and raped repeatedly from age 6 to age 16, sometimes multiple times a day," she wrote.

"You broke me that day and I considered ending my own life then for the shame I felt!"

Braxton ended the email by pleading with WeTv execs to set her free from "the chains" because she "can't breathe."

A source tells Sandrarose.com that Braxton was "upset" over promotional material created by producers of her reality show "Tamar Baxton: Get Ya Life."

The source said Braxton did not approve of scenes that were used in the reality show's promotional trailer sent to bloggers on Thursday.

Page Six reached out to the network's executives for a comment about Braxton's allegations.

"We are keeping her and her family in our thoughts and prayers and joining with her fans sending strength and healing at this difficult time," a WeTV rep said.

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America's response to the coronavirus pandemic has left millions of people feeling hopeless and despondent over mounting debt from job losses.

The suicide rate in America is rising as many Americans feel desperate, hopeless and lonely. 75% of Americans are on lockdown around the nation.

A 38-year-old man in Wilson, Pennsylvania attempted a murder-suicide after losing his job. He opened fire on his girlfriend before fatally shooting himself on Monday. His girlfriend survived.

2 U.S. Air Force Academy cadets took their own lives after being quarantined on campus in Colorado Springs, CO. They were due to graduate in May.

Phones are ringing off the hook at suicide hotlines around the country in recent weeks. One Suicide Prevention Services hotline in Illinois does not have enough staff to field all the calls.

"We are seeing a massive shift to anxiety," said Suicide Prevention Services Education and Training Director Natasha Clark. She said callers are not necessarily worried about catching the virus, they are more fearful of its financial impact on their lives from job loss, homelessness, and loneliness.

"Alone with their thoughts, so many callers are on the brink. It's creating a sense of deep despair among callers," Clark told the Chicago Tribune.

"We can't even count on accessing emergency resources because even that is tenuous right now."

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Shibbon Winelle gave a tearful account of her son, Bryce Gowdy's final moments before he was hit by a train earlier this week. Authorities in South Florida ruled the 17-year-old's death a suicide.

Bryce was a 4-star Georgia Tech recruit who appeared to be suffering from a mental health crisis in the last few days before he died.

Winelle, who claims she has mental health issues of her own, posted a YouTube video explaining the "spiritual conservations" she had with Bryce.

Winelle and her children were often homeless and had been living in her car and hotel rooms. The night Bryce died, they were homeless again.

Bryce was scheduled to start classes at Georgia Tech in Atlanta on January 6. But he was worried about leaving his family in that predicament.

She said Bryce, the eldest of her three sons, repeatedly asked her questions about religion and about life. She said he talked a mile a minute, and his endless questions made her heart hurt.

When he asked to hold her hand, she refused. She told him to "toughen up" and "get it together."

"A few days ago, Bryce was talking crazy... He was happy though, he was talking about his future. He was talking about going to Georgia Tech," she said through tears. "He had a lot of questions about spirituality and life. He kept asking if I was OK, if his brothers were going to be OK. I said, 'yeah.'"

"We sat in the car all day... because we didn't have anywhere to go," she said. "He sat next to me just talking. I was stressed. I was too stressed to really deal with it. We were on the streets again, homeless. The little job I got wasn't paying me my money on time or in full."

After Winelle picked up her son, Brayden, from work that night, the family went to their hotel room.

She said she locked herself in the bathroom to take a break from Bryce's intense questions. 30 minutes later, she emerged from the bathroom and asked Bryce to go to the car to get her favorite blanket. The time was 3:30 a.m.

When he didn't return, she went out to look for him. Her blanket was gone from her car and Bryce was nowhere to be found.

Winelle said he left his cell phone, wallet and shoes behind in the hotel room. Later that morning, Winelle called her older brother, who told her someone was hit by a train at 4 a.m.

"I've been begging for help for months," she cried. "For months, I've been begging for help."

Over $95,000 in donations have poured in to a GoFundMe page to help the Gowdy family get back on their feet.

A recent study shows a dramatic increase in suicide deaths among Black adolescents and teenagers.

From 1991 to 2017, suicide attempts among Black children and teens rose by 73%.

If you or someone you know is in emotional distress or suicidal crisis, call the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255).