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Lawmakers in Georgia, Kentucky, and Texas have proposed legislation to ban doctors from prescribing puberty blockers and other hormone drugs for children.

Georgia State Rep. Ginny Ehrhart is drafting a bill that would block medical providers from facilitating a medical "transition" for minors by prescribing puberty blockers and cross-sex hormones.

The lawmakers acted out of a sense of concern for children after a Texas mother brainwashed her 3-year-old son to believe he was a girl.

The child, now 7, attended school as a boy for the first time in his young life this week. His mother, a pediatrician, convinced the youngster that he was a girl because he played with a girl's toy in a McDonald's happy meal when he was 3.

The boy's father asked a judge to grant him full custody of the boy, but a Texas jury awarded primary custody to the mother and allowed her to continue transitioning the boy into a girl.

In response to the overwhelming public backlash, the presiding judge overturned the jury's decision.

"We're talking about children that can't get a tattoo or smoke a cigar or a cigarette in the state of Georgia, but can be castrated and get sterilized," Ehrhart told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

In 2018, Ehrhart defeated Democrat Jen Slipakoff, who is raising her son as "transgender" because at 2 years old he showed an interest in pink pajamas and cupcakes.

People who "transition" their minor children to the opposite sex tend to be white women who suffer from Munchausen by proxy syndrome.

Munchausen by proxy syndrome is a mental condition in which a parent or caregiver fakes or causes illness in children for attention from healthcare workers and the news media.

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Douglas County Sheriff's Office

A Colorado woman who sought donations to fulfill her terminally ill daughter's "bucket list" was arrested and charged with the girl's murder.

Kelly Renee Turner, 41, organized ride-alongs with police and fire crews for 7-year-old Olivia Gant, and the Make-A-Wish Foundation paid $11,000 for a "bat princess" costume party for Olivia.

Turner publicized her daughter's terminal illness and promoted the girl's "bucket list" of dreams to fulfill before she died.

When Olivia died in 2017, her cause of death was listed as a variety of ailments including an intestinal disorder, brain seizures, and a buildup of fluid deep in the brain.

But when Olivia's body was exhumed last year, a coroner did not find physical evidence of those disorders. Her cause of death was listed as undetermined.

The Douglas County Sheriff's Office arrested Turner at a Denver-area hotel on Friday. She is being held without bond.

Police say Olivia was in and out of hospitals for most of her 7 years. In the months before she died she received nutrition through a feeding tube.

She was admitted in July 2017 to Children's Hospital Colorado, where doctors said she showed signs of malnutrition.

One doctor told investigators Turner insisted that he sign a "do not resuscitate" (DNR) order for her daughter.

The doctor said Turner wanted to withdraw all medical care and give Olivia nutrition intravenously (via IV) rather than through a feeding tube in her stomach.

Doctors told Turner Olivia wouldn't survive on IV nutrition, and Turner was given the option of taking her home on hospice care. Olivia died at home a few weeks later.

Doctor's suspicions grew when Turner brought another daughter to the hospital and claimed she had "bone pain."

Turner brought up Munchausen syndrome by proxy in an interview with investigators last year.

Munchausen syndrome by proxy is a psychological condition in which a parent or caregiver exaggerates or causes medical illnesses in children for attention from healthcare workers.

"That has never been my case, like at all, whatsoever," Turner said in the interview.

Turner is also accused of fraudulently obtaining about $539,000 worth of medical care for her two daughters from the government-funded Medicaid program.

Last week, a Dallas woman was sentenced to six years in prison for subjecting her 10-year-old son to hundreds of procedures and 13 major surgeries in another case of Munchausen by proxy.

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Dallas County Sheriff's Dept.

A Dallas woman was sentenced to six years in prison for subjecting her 10-year-old son, Christopher to hundreds of procedures and 13 major surgeries.

According to a Child Protective Services (CPS) complaint obtained by the Star-Telegram, Kaylene Bowen-Wright faked or caused her son's illnesses and medical problems almost from the day he was born.

CPS states Bowen-Wright, 36, subjected Christopher to years of unnecessary invasive medical treatments in Dallas, where they lived.

Bowen-Wright pleaded guilty to injury to a child causing serious bodily harm. She admitted she faked his medical conditions and subjected him to 13 major surgeries as well as hundreds of minor medical procedures.

According to the Dallas Morning News, Christopher was fed through a feeding tube and for a time he was in a wheelchair.

When he was 5, Christopher was placed in hospice care and Bowen-Wright signed a "do not resuscitate” order, meaning nurses would allow him to die if his condition took a turn for the worse.

"(She would) just always say that something's wrong with Christopher all the time," the child's father, Ryan Crawford testified in court. "It was just one thing after another."

Bowen-Wright was arrested in 2017 after CPS notified authorities of a possible Munchausen syndrome by proxy child abuse case. Her other children were removed from her home.

Munchausen syndrome by proxy is a condition in which a mentally unstable parent or caregiver exaggerates or causes medical problems in children or people in their care.

Christopher, who has healed from his surgeries, was placed in his father's custody by the state.

"She stole Christopher's childhood," prosecutor Jennifer Sawyer said in court.

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The model girlfriend of a boy band singer is being accused of faking their son's illness in a possible case of Munchausen by proxy. The photo used in this post is a stock photo.

The model broke up with the boy band singer about a year after the child was born. She claims the boy has a rare disorder for which he needs surgery. She posts dozens of photos of the child undergoing diagnostic testing in various hospitals.

In a social media post on Monday, Nov. 26, the model acknowledged that a case has been filed with Child Protective Services in NYC, though she didn't specify the details of the CPS case.

The model is now demanding a meeting with the governor of New York and the mayor of New York City to discuss the case with CPS.

She accused the singer of not paying the boy’s medical bills, but his fans accused her of faking the severity of the child's illness for attention.

Munchausen syndrome by proxy (MSBP) or Munchausen by proxy (MBP) is a psychological disorder characterized by attention-seeking behavior by a caregiver who exaggerates the illness of a person in their care.

Sufferers of MBPS are most often women with small children.

Disclaimer:

The photo used in this post is a stock photo. It is being used for illustration purposes only and is not intended to identify any particular individual as the subject of this post. We take no responsibility or liability for the assumptions made by our readers.