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Fans are concerned for Atlanta rapper Lil Baby's health after viral video shows him jerking uncontrollably during a radio interview. The "Perfect Timing" rapper exhibited involuntary jerking movements of his head and upper torso during a recent interview with Atlanta's Hot 107.9.

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Colleton County officials say no charges will be filed against the 5th grader involved in a classroom fight with 10-year-old RaNiya Wright last month. A coroner ruled that RaNiya died of natural causes two days later in an intensive care unit.

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Hillary Clinton

Hillary Clinton's other shoe dropped, literally, at a 9/11 memorial event in New York City on Sunday.

Clinton, 69, abruptly left the September 11th Commemoration Ceremony because she was reportedly "overheated" in 82-degree weather in New York City.

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Hillary Clinton

The FBI released bombshell documents from an interview with Hillary Clinton about her illegal email server.

In the data dump on Friday, Hillary Clinton said she forgot or couldn't remember any of the briefings she received at the state department after her concussion in 2012.

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Hillary Clinton

Over the weekend, the Drudgereport.com published a Reuters photo that showed presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, 69, being assisted up a flight of stairs by aides in February.

The photo sparked calls from the public for Clinton to open her medical records and prove she is medically fit to run for office.

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It isn't often that a child falls asleep during important meetings, such as signing her first recording contract with Jay Z, or nodding off during a Senate hearing on human trafficking, like Willow Smith has done.

Narcolepsy means excessive sleepiness or falling asleep at the most inopportune times.

Children with narcolepsy often are not diagnosed with the sleep disorder until they are well into their teens or adulthood, when the disorder becomes a health issue or a distraction.

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Jack Osbourne, the 26-year-old son of rock musician Ozzy Osbourne and music manager Sharon Osbourne, has been diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis.

Other celebrities afflicted with the nerve disorder include actress Lola Falana, the late comic Richard Pryor, and R&B singer Tamia.

MS is a disease in which the body's immune system attacks its own nerve cells by eating away at the sheath that protects the nerves similar to the insulation coating covering electrical wires in your home.

Once the protective coating on the nerve is damaged, the flow of electricity from the brain to the body is interrupted.

People with severe cases of multiple sclerosis may lose the ability to walk or speak, according to the Mayo Clinic.

There is no cure for multiple sclerosis. But with medication and therapy the debilitating symptoms of MS may be alleviated, delayed or controlled (for a long period time). 40% of people with MS reach the 70th year of life. The main cause of death of people with MS is suicide.

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Breast cancer survivor Sheryl Crow was diagnosed with a benign brain tumor after experiencing memory problems.

Crow, 50, said she grew concerned when she forgot the lyrics to one of her songs onstage.

"I was worried about my memory so much that I went and got an MRI. And I found out I have a brain tumour," Sheryl told Las Vegas Review-Journal.

The Grammy award winner, who was serenaded by Rihanna at a recent breast cancer benefit, told her audience "I'm 50, what can I say? My brain's gone to s--t."

Crow will not require surgery.

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We've all seen the touching photos of Halle Berry's 3-year-old daughter Nahla caressing Halle's face or exploring the handsome features of her father, Gabe Aubry. We all assumed that Nahla was just a very affectionate little girl.

But as a loyal reader pointed out in an email to Sandrarose.com earlier this week, Nahla might be an autistic or special needs child who communicates nonverbally with her hands.

The list of famous celebrities with autistic children includes Toni Braxton, Holly Robinson Peete, Sylvester Stalone, John Travolta, Jenny McCarthy, Dan Marino, Dawn Neufeld ('Football Wives'), and more.

Signs of autism begin in babies before they are 12 months old. Most children are diagnosed with autism by age 2 or 3. That's the age when parents become aware that their toddlers' communications skills aren't keeping pace with other toddlers their age.

Autism is a disorder of the nerves in the brain that interferes with the signals sent from the brain to other parts of the body. The disorder is marked by poor communication skills and lack of social interaction. Doctors aren't sure what causes autism.

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Yesterday, the sports world was rocked by the heartbreaking news that legendary University of Tennessee women's basketball coach Pat Summitt had been diagnosed with early onset dementia. The winner of eight national NCAA titles with the Tennessee Vols is only 59.

Imagine being 59 and finding out that you will soon wear adult diapers and be unable to care for yourself or maintain control of your most basic bodily functions.

The diagnosis was made after the Hall of Fame coach said she visited with doctors at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., after the end of the 2010-11 basketball season.

When Ms. Summitt was given her diagnosis she said she reacted with anger and depression. Then she accepted her diagnosis and eventually shared it with her student athletes. She told them she plans to continue coaching with the aide of her assistant coaches.

"I plan to continue to be your coach," Summitt said. "Obviously, I realize I may have some limitations with this condition since there will be some good days and some bad days."

Next to cancer, dementia is the worst type of diagnosis for an energetic woman like Pat Summitt who is so full of life.

Dementia is a gradual loss of cognitive function (altered thought process) which leads to chronic memory loss and disorganized thinking. The onset of the disease usually begins after age 65 and can lead to Alzheimer's disease within 10 years of diagnosis. Dementia is rare under age 65.

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Most of us have that one friend who seems to fall in love as easily as he or she changes their underwear.

She's the one who calls you every time she's met "The One" -- and she wants to share the exciting news with you -- again. Your friend has run through literally a hundred men. All the rest were "losers," she says, "but this guy is different. He understands me."

Before you know it, she's already planning her dream wedding to a guy she met just one week ago. She uses language such as, 'I met a new guy... he swept me off my feet!,' 'I LOVE him!,' 'He's so hawt!,' 'I CAN'T STOP THINKING ABOUT HIM!'

One of the reasons why your friend falls so hard for every hawt guy she meets, is because she is flying high off a dopamine rush. Your friend has what psychologists refer to as an addictive personality.

Addictive personalities are easy to spot: they're the ones with cigarette butts dangling from their lips every time you see them. They can't stop drinking or put down that weed, and they can play video games nonstop for hours on end without stopping to take a bite to eat.

Dopamine is the primary chemical in the brain that causes addictive personalities.

Basically, dopamine brightens and highlights our connections with the world around us, says David Goldman, Ph.D., a neuro-scientist with the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. "It's essential for associating something that happens with the feeling of pleasure." In other words, it reinforces behaviors that make us feel good. Source

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