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A homeless opera singer who was discovered by the LAPD while singing in a L.A. subway station has lost her recording contract. A LAPD officer recorded Emily Zamourka singing opera in an L.A. metro subway station.

The officer's cell phone video went viral, and offers poured in from music producers and record label execs. Zamourka, a talented former opera singer and violinist, told reporters she was a Russian immigrant who fell on hard times and ended up homeless. She said she played the violin on the streets of Los Angeles to earn money.

Zamourka was offered a recording contract from two-time grammy-winning producer Joel Diamond. Corky Hale, a music industry veteran, offered to replace her $10,000 violin that was reportedly stolen a few months ago.

Unfortunately this rags-to-riches story did not have a happy ending.

Diamond has withdrawn his recording contract offer to the singer, The Blast reports. Zamourka never signed the contract.

Diamond said Zamourka refused to comply with contractual agreements to make appearances and to work with top flight producers and songwriters.

"Emily (Zamourka) has not responded to what I felt was the 'world on a silver platter' proven formula that has worked hugely successfully for me before. To say we are not on the same page artistically, would be an understatement," says Diamond.

"In addition, she did not even want to listen to a song that I personally requested for her from one of the most successful songwriters in the world, Diane Warren," he said.

Zamourka also declined offers to replace her stolen violin. Diamond says she "turned down multiple free violins from well-known musicians to replace her stolen one."

Homeless people are notorious for rejecting offers of help returning to the rat race.
 

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Grammy-winning opera singer Jessye Norman has died at age 74. Once considered the world's number one soprano singer, Jessye Norman won four Grammy Awards, including a Grammy lifetime achievement award, and the National Medal of Arts for her legendary talents.

Ms. Norman's death was announced by her family. She died in New York on Monday from septic shock and multi-organ failure secondary to complications of a spinal cord injury she had sustained in 2015, according to the statement.

"We are so proud of Jessye's musical achievements and the inspiration that she provided to audiences around the world that will continue to be a source of joy," the statement from her family reads. "We are equally proud of her humanitarian endeavors addressing matters such as hunger, homelessness, youth development, and arts and culture education."

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Ms. Norman is a native of Augusta, Georgia. She began singing in the Mount Calvary Baptist Church at age four. Her mother, Janie King-Norman, a schoolteacher, insisted she start piano lessons at age 5.

She earned a scholarship to the historically black college Howard University in Washington, D.C. to study music. She also studied at the Peabody Conservatory and the University of Michigan.

Ms. Norman made her operatic debut in 1969 in Berlin, and has thrilled audiences in Milan, London and New York.

The Rachel Longstreet Foundation and Norman partnered to open the Jessye Norman School of the Arts, a tuition-free performing arts after-school program for economically disadvantaged students in Augusta.

She is best known for her roles in the operas of Richard Wagner, such as Lohengrin, Tannhäuser and Tristan and Isolde.

Norman was never married and had no children.