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A Georgia deputy who beat a Black man unconscious for refusing to show his driver's license has been fired.

Sean Williams, an attorney for Roderick Walker, a 26-year-old Black male who was repeatedly punched by a Clayton County deputy during a traffic stop, is demanding that criminal charges be filed against the terminated officer.

"They almost killed him," Williams told USA Today. "They committed an aggravated assault on this man and luckily I'm not talking to you about Mr. Walker's death."

According to MSN.com, the incident occurred Friday in Clayton County, Georgia, just south of Atlanta. Video of the assault went viral after it was uploaded to social media by Walker's girlfriend, Juanita Davis.

Williams said Walker, Davis, their 5-month-old son, and Davis' 5-year-old son from a previous relationship, had dropped off a rental car and paid a man $10 to drive them home. Police stopped the vehicle for a broken tail light.

Williams said the deputies asked Walker, who was in the passenger seat, for his ID and Walker stated he did not have one. A struggle ensued when the deputies ordered Walker out of the car for back-talking them.

Davis is heard hysterically screaming "Get off of him" and "Don't kill him. He said he can't breathe, officer."

Her son is heard yelling, "Daddy!" in the background of the video.

The sheriff's office fired one of the deputies, but Williams wants the second officer to be fired also and both should face criminal charges.

The sheriff's office said it turned over the criminal investigation to Clayton County District Attorney Tasha Mosley.

Mosley, who is Black, said in a statement that she had requested materials related to the investigation and would consider charges upon receiving them.

"If the final outcome of the investigation leads us to bring charges we are unsure at this time when it will come before a Grand Jury," Mosley said.

Walker has been transferred to the Fulton County Jail to face outstanding warrants on probation violations in Fulton County.

Williams said Walker was "illegally arrested" and police are using the outstanding warrants to "deflect from their horrendous acts."

"Roderick Walker is in jail solely because he was illegally arrested after being assaulted by Clayton County Sheriff deputies, not because of anything he did during that incident or in the past," Williams said. "Mr. Walker would not be in jail if it were not for this unlawful arrest that violated his legal and constitutional rights."
 

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A Miami-Dade County police officer was relieved of duty after he was caught on camera punching a Black woman during a heated encounter at Miami International Airport.

Antonio Clemente Rodriguez initially claimed the woman "headbutted" him before he subdued her and took her into custody. The charge and the woman's identity are unknown.

According to police, the woman complained loudly that she missed her flight and a ticket agent called police.

The video, which was uploaded to Facebook on Wednesday, shows a Black woman arguing with a masked cop. She then stepped into his personal space and said, "You acting like you white when you really Black... What you want to do?"

Rodriguez, who is mixed with Black and Puerto Rican, is seen punching the woman and restraining her on police body cam.
 

The president of the Miami-Dade County Police Benevolent Association defended Rodriguez in a statement. He said the woman was "clearly" the aggressor, and Rodriguez was merely defending himself when he struck her with an "open hand slap," which is referred to as a "diversionary strike".

"Clearly she was the aggressor. She was being asked to leave. She's being belligerent and she pushes her face right into his face," PBA President Steadman Stahl told the Miami Herald.

But after carefully reviewing the video, county officials condemned the officer's actions.

"I am shocked and angered by a body cam video that I just saw involving one of our officers," Miami-Dade police Director Alfredo Ramirez said in a statement on Twitter.

"I've immediately initiated an investigation and ordered that the involved officers be relieved of duty."

"This is appalling," Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos Giminez tweeted on Wednesday.

"It's excessive use of force and unnecessary. That's NOT what our @MiamiDadePD are trained to do. @MDPD_Director Ramirez has ordered the officer relieved of duty & investigation is underway. This is why I instituted body cameras & MDPD is reviewing all footage."

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A 911 dispatcher was so concerned after watching a live feed of George Floyd's arrest on May 25, that she called a sergeant to express her concerns.

The phone call came to light in a newly released transcript from the Minneapolis Police Department, according to Fox5DC.

In the phone call between the dispatcher and a police sergeant, the woman said she watched the arrest on live camera feed outside Cup Foods in south Minneapolis.

"You can call me a snitch if you want to," she said, before adding she saw three officers physically restrain Floyd who was already handcuffed on the ground.

"All of them sat on this man. I don't know if they needed to or not. They haven't said anything to me yet," the dispatcher added.

The sergeant said he would look into the problem, before the call with the dispatcher ended.

The transcript also included two calls from pedestrians who witnessed the murder. Both calls were placed at 8:32 p.m.

In the first call, the bystander said he watched as an officer, "just pretty much killed this guy that wasn't resisting arrest. He had his knee on the dude's neck the whole time."

The caller asked to speak with a supervisor and was in the middle of being connected when the call abruptly ended.

A second call placed about 30 seconds later was also disconnected before the caller could speak with a supervisor about the incident.

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Kandi Burruss broke down in tears while trying to explain police brutality to her 4-year-old son, Ace Tucker.

On Wednesday's episode of "Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen," the "Real Housewives of Atlanta" star got emotional while explaining an adult conversation with her toddler, who previously dressed up as a police officer for "Career Day" at his school.

Kandi said her son asked her if cops were "the bad guys" now.

"Now, isn't that crazy to have to explain that to a 4-year-old?" Kandi told Cohen and Tamron Hall via Skype. "For you to be black and have to worry about the police being the bad guys? I know y'all say I cry all the time, but that's an emotional thing for me," the reality star said through tears.

Speaking to Cohen directly, Kandi said, "I know you care about us, but you don't have to think about that ... That's something that we have to think about for our sons."

Kandi also said hr 17-year-old daughter, Riley, unfollowed her white friends who refused to discuss racial politics on their timelines.

"She is very opinionated. She was like, 'OK. I am unfollowing every single friend or person that is not black who is not speaking up about this, who is not showing that they are an ally with our community.'"
 

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Ice Cube raised eyebrows when he tweeted what appears to be anti-Semitic imagery and conspiracy theories on Twitter.com earlier this week.

The 50-year-old rapper, actor and director tweeted an image of a group of men playing Monopoly on the backs of Black people. Another image suggested that the "Black Cube of Saturn" is part of the Star of David.

Ice Cube, real name O'Shea Jackson, tweeted imagery that didn't make much sense to some of his followers -- including an image of a police officer copulating with a dog.

Cube also shared images of Egyptian statues on Wednesday that have been linked to a Russian propaganda website, according to The Daily Beast.

Many of Cube's followers asked him to take the images down, but he refused.

In response to fans and friends who believed his Twitter page was hacked, Cube wrote:

"This is CUBE. My account has not been hacked. I speak for no organization. I only speak for the meek people of thee earth. We will not expect crumbles from your table. We have to power of almighty God backing us all over the earth. NO MORE TALKING. Repent."

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Ice Cube (pictured with his wife Kimberly) has always been outspoken on social issues, particularly on the subject of police brutality. As a member of the rap group NWA, Ice Cube made headlines when he defended the group's hit song "Fuk Da Police".

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All 57 members of Buffalo, NY's Emergency Response Team resigned in "disgust" after two of their fellow officers were suspended for shoving an elderly man to the ground during a George Floyd protest.

Graphic film shot by a cameraman for WBFO News shows Martin Gugino, 75, approach a group of Buffalo police officers and attempt to interact with them.

Two of the officers shoved the elderly man to the ground, causing him to hit his head on the sidewalk.

Blood is seen pouring from Gugino's right ear as he lay motionless on the sidewalk while the officers callously walked past him.

Gugino, a longtime peace activist from Amherst, was hospitalized at Erie County Medical Center with a concussion.

Two officers were suspended, and NY Gov. Andrew Cuomo called for the officers to be criminally charged.

"You see that video and it disturbs your basic sense of decency and humanity," Cuomo said Friday during his daily press briefing on the coronavirus.

"Why, why, why was that necessary? Where was the threat? Older gentleman. Where was the threat? And then you just walk by the person while you see blood coming from his head."

He added: "I was sick to my stomach... it was the same feeling I had for 90 of the past nights when I got the death tolls for coronavirus. I was physically sick to my stomach."

WARNING: the video is very graphic. Viewer discretion is advised.
 

Star Tribune via Getty Images

Nick Cannon explained why he had to go to Minneapolis to join protesters after George Floyd died at the hands of a former Minneapolis police officer.

The 39-year-old actor and comedian joined peaceful protesters to celebrate the memory of Floyd and to demand justice outside the Cup Foods store on Chicago Avenue in South Minneapolis where Floyd died on May 25.

In an interview with Variety.com, Cannon called on white people to support the protesters and "dismantle all of those [racist] systems that this country was built on."

"That's why so many people get it wrong when it comes to racism. People think 'Oh no, I'm not a racist.' But if you support this system, you support racism. If you don't step up and say this system has been wrong for years — from the war on drugs to criminalization of black men in general to the school-to-prison pipeline to the prison industrial complex.

"The same thing that made me go to Minneapolis is the same thing that made me go to Ferguson and to Charlottesville and to jails in Cook County and Washington, D.C. and to study criminology at Howard University. I did not want to be another celebrity tweeting or reposting a picture. I want to be authentic and educated and informed. I had to go to it."

Cannon is the ex-husband of pop singer Mariah Carey, 51. They share 9-year-old fraternal twins: daughter Monroe and son Moroccan Scott.

Patrick McMullan via Getty Images

CNN anchor Don Lemon called out America's Black, wealthy elite for "sitting in their mansions doing nothing" while cities burned across America.

Widespread rioting, arson and looting spread across the United States in response to the killing of George Floyd, a Black man who died in Minneapolis police custody last month.

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The CNN Tonight host called out a slew of famous Black millionaires and one billionaire -- Oprah -- for doing nothing while rioters destroyed parts of the Black community.

Celebrities such as Michael Jordan, Eminem, T.I. Harris, and more have spoken out about what they called the "systemic racism" in America that led to Floyd's death.

But Lemon said those prominent voices are doing nothing to reach the disaffected and alienated youth.

"What about Hollywood? Strangely quiet," Don said during a conversation with Rev. William Barber. "I've seen them on Twitter, I see them, 'Oh, I'm loving what Don Lemon's doing'... But they gotta do more than that."

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Lemon called out wealthy celebrities like Ellen DeGeneres, Oprah Winfrey, Tyler Perry, Sean Combs, Drake, and more, acknowledging that while they do donate "millions," their "visibility in helping speak out for these young kids" is what's needed right now.

He added:

"Why aren't they helping these young people? These young people are out there standing on a platform at the edge of an abyss by themselves. Yes, I'm calling you out, and you can be mad at me all you want. And what they're doing, you're sitting there and watching TV and you’re b*tching abut it."

Lemon has been very vocal about President Trump's lack of leadership during the civil unrest.

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A Black police officer was suspended after viral video shows him knocking out a mixed-race woman who assaulted a police sergeant during a George Floyd protest in Baltimore on Friday night.

Cellphone video shows the barefoot woman arguing with a white male police sergeant who grabbed her arm when she turned to walk away.

The woman responded angrily by punching him twice in the head. The Black cop, who was behind the woman, landed a solid right to the woman's face, knocking her to the pavement.

The video went viral, sparking more outrage on social media early Saturday.

Baltimore Mayor Bernard C. "Jack" Young said in a statement that the officer had been "removed from police duties" and the incident is under investigation, The Baltimore Sun reported.

Mayor Young called the footage "deeply disturbing."

Young said the officer who was struck by the woman "showed remarkable restraint by not retaliating as he was being assaulted."

Baltimore City Fraternal Order of Police President Mike Mancuso said, "it is reprehensible that you would use political pressure after a situation where one officer was protecting his colleague from further attack. Escalation occurred only after the female attacker continued the assault."

The woman was not charged with assault.

Violent protests and fires erupted in cities across the U.S. for the 4th straight night in response to the murder of an unarmed Black man in Minneapolis, Minnesota on Monday, May 25.

Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, 44, was arrested and charged with the murder of George Floyd, 46, on Friday.

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A Minnesota medical examiner has determined that George Floyd died from the combined effects of Coronary Artery Disease, hypertensive heart disease, and a knee pressed against his neck and back.

The medical examiner found no evidence that Floyd died from traumatic asphyxia or strangulation, the complaint said, according to NBC News.

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Derek Chauvin, the Minneapolis police officer who kneeled on Floyd's neck for exactly 8 minutes and 45 seconds, was fired from the police force on Tuesday along with officers Tou Thao, Thomas Lane, and J Alexander Kueng.

The four officers responded to a 911 call of a "forgery in process" at Cup Foods on Monday, May 25.

According to the state charging documents, the officers found Floyd, 46, sitting in his car outside the store. He was removed from the car and arrested for passing a counterfeit $20 bill in the store.

The document states Floyd refused to get into a patrol unit and complained that he was claustrophobic and he could not breathe.

"While standing outside the car, Mr. Floyd began saying and repeating that he could not breathe," the document said.

When Floyd was placed facedown on the pavement, Chauvin placed his left knee "in the area of Mr. Floyd's head and neck," according to prosecutors.

"Mr. Floyd said, 'I can't breathe' multiple times and repeatedly said, 'Mama' and 'please,' as well."

One of Chauvin's fellow officers suggested rolling Floyd over on his side, but Chauvin said, "No, staying put where we got him."

When Floyd eventually fell silent and stopped moving, "officer Kueng checked Floyd's wrist for a pulse and said, 'I couldn't find one.' None of the officers moved from their positions," the complaint said.

After three days of unrest, looting and vandalism in south Minneapolis, Chauvin, 44, was arrested Friday and charged with 3rd degree murder and manslaughter in Floyd's death. There were no other arrests.

The coroner's report will likely form the basis of Chauvin's defense during his trial.

His legal team will attempt to convince a jury that Floyd would have died in police custody even if Chuavin had not kneeled on his carotid artery for 8 minutes and 45 seconds.

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Former President Barack Obama spoke out about the death of George Floyd, the Black Minneapolis man who died after a white officer knelt on his neck during an arrest on Monday.

In an open letter shared on Twitter Friday morning, the former president spoke of the frustrations expressed in conversations he had about Floyd's death.

He noted that incidents of police brutality cannot be allowed to be regarded as a normal part of daily life.

"This shouldn't be 'normal' in 2020 America. It can't be 'normal.' If we want our children to grow up in a nation that lives up to its highest ideals, we can and must do better."

Obama, who is biracial, said the country must commit to improved racial relations.

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George Floyd and the ex-Minneapolis police officer who killed him may have known each other, according to a report by KSTP.com.

The former owner of a south Minneapolis nightclub says ex-cop George Floyd and Derek Chauvin worked overlapping shifts as security at her club until the end of last year.

"Chauvin was our off-duty police for almost the entirety of the 17 years that we were open," said Maya Santamaria, former owner of El Nuevo Rodeo club on Lake Street.

She wasn't sure if the two men knew each other. "They were working together at the same time, it's just that Chauvin worked outside and the security guards were inside."

Santamaria said she sold the club a few months ago. Santamaria was among millions worldwide who viewed the horrific video that showed Chauvin kneeling on Floyd's neck until he died.

"I didn't recognize George as one of our security guys because he looked really different lying there like that," she said.

She also didn't recognize Chauvin at first. "My friend sent me (the video) and said this is your guy who used to work for you and I said, 'It's not him.' And then they did the closeup and that's when I said, 'Oh my God, that's him,'"

Chauvin, 44, is one of four officers fired from the police force a day after Floyd's death. Chauvin responded to a 911 call of a "forgery in process" on Monday - along with ex-cops Tou Thao, Thomas Lane, and J Alexander Kueng.

Violent protests continued for the 3rd night in south Minneapolis.

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Hennepin County prosecutor Michael Freeman says there is currently no evidence to bring charges against one of the four officers involved in George Floyd's death.

Freeman responded to a question from a reporter asking why there are no charges against Derek Chauvin, the cop who was directly involved in Floyd's death.

Freeman said the video is "graphic and horrific and terrible," but "there is other evidence that does not support a criminal charge."

"My business is 'is it criminal?' and that's what we have to prove," he said

Freeman said his office will not rush to justice but they will "wade through" the evidence before charges can be brought.

U.S Attorney Erica McDonald said police are given "wide latitude" to use "a certain amount of force" and she is trying to determine if excessive force was used in this case.

All four officers were fired on Tuesday, a day after Floyd died.

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A mayor in Mississippi sparked outrage when he tweeted an insensitive comment about George Floyd, the Black man who was killed in police custody.

Floyd, 46, died from asphyxia when ex-cop Derek Chauvin knelt on his neck for nearly 8 minutes. Floyd died at the scene on Monday, May 25.

Hal Marx, the mayor of Petal, MS, said Floyd's trachea was not obstructed by the officer's knee, because when Floyd said he couldn't breathe, that proved he was breathing.

Marx made the comment on Twitter on Wednesday.

"I didn't see anything unreasonable. If you can say you can't breathe, you're breathing," Marx tweeted. Marx added, "Most likely that man died of overdose or heart attack. Video doesn't show his resistance that got him in that position. Police being crucified."

Following the backlash, Marx tried to clear up what he wrote, saying his tweet was "misinterpreted," and no one knows for sure how Floyd died.

"I think that people are so quick to judge the police before they have all the facts," he told the Hattiesburg American.

"I can't say whether a crime was committed or whether they did anything right or wrong, all I'm saying is don't rush to judgment based on what you see in that video."

Clarence Magee, president of the Forrest County NAACP, said the mayor's comment was uncalled for. "To hear that statement made by a mayor or anybody is very troubling," he said.

The tweet has since been deleted.

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Congresswoman Maxine Waters took aim at President Donald Trump during an interview with TMZ on Friday. Waters, a Democrat who represents California, accused Trump of "dog whistling" which creates an environment that led to a police officer "enjoying" the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis.

Floyd, 46, died from asphyxiation after a cop kneeled on his neck during an arrest for "forgery" in Minneapolis. Four cops were fired from the force a day later.

The 81-year-old congresswoman wore a face mask while Skyping with the gossip blog from her home.

"I'm reflecting on all the killings of young black men in particular but of course black woman too, at the hands of the police and at the hands of, you know these white supremacists. And I'm thinking about the way that the president conducts himself. In a way he's dog-whistling. And I think that they are feeling that they can get away with this kind of treatment. And I'm just so sorry about the loss of another life."

She added:

"I think that the officer who had his knee on his neck enjoyed doing what he was doing. I believe sometimes some of these offices leave home, thinking I'm going to get me one today. And I think this is his one that he got today. And he didn’t care of whether or not anybody was photographing him. He did what he was doing, and the officers who stood there and watched him are just as guilty as he is. And I’m glad that all of them were fired."