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Cobb County PD

A former Atlanta police officer robbed Cobb County hotel guests while wearing his full police uniform and badge, authorities say.

Justin Thorne was arrested and charged with multiple felonies in connection with an armed robbery at a Comfort Inn and Suites off Windy Hill Road in Cobb County, Ga, Channel 2 Action News reports.

Thorne was captured on the hotel's surveillance cameras in the hallway outside the room of 2 hotel guests visiting from Arkansas on Oct. 17.

Thorne was dressed in full police uniform, including a bulletproof vest, hat, a gun belt and a police badge, according to WSB-TV.

The 22-year-old officer forced the hotel guests to hand over $800 in cash and an iPhone worth $700.

Thorne joined the Atlanta Police Department in 2017 and worked as a patrol officer on the city's southeast side until earlier this year when he resigned.

According to documents obtained by WSB-TV, in September Thorne was the subject of an investigation into allegations that he took payment from a suspect to make an outstanding warrant go away.

"When Thorne was asked by OPS to make a statement about the allegation, he chose to abruptly resign on October 1," according to the APD's Office of Professional Standards.

Cobb County Police are trying to determine if there are other victims.

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Dekalb Police Dept/USAF

A Georgia police officer who shot a mentally ill, unarmed Black veteran was acquitted of murder on Friday, Nov. 1. Former DeKalb County police officer Robert "Chip" Olsen was acquitted of two murder charges in the 2015 shooting death of 26-year-old Anthony Hill.

The jury found Olsen guilty of aggravated assault, making a false statement and two counts of violation of oath.

The presiding judge, LaTisha Dear Jackson, sentenced Olsen to 20 years in prison on Friday. He must serve 12 years in prison before he can be released.

In March 2015, Olsen was called to an Atlanta apartment complex to investigate a report of a naked man behaving erratically.

Upon arriving, Olsen said he saw a naked man running toward him. Olsen yelled for Hill to stop, then fired his service weapon, striking Hill twice and killing him.

The shooting of an unarmed Black man resulted in civil unrest and protests in the DeKalb and Atlanta areas.

Hill's family said he had a history of mental illness and he was diagnosed with bipolar disorder and PTSD after leaving the armed services.

Activists had asked for Olsen to be sentenced to 35 years in prison. But Judge Jackson sentenced him to 20 years and eight years of probation following his release from prison.
 

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A routine shoplifting trip to a Family Dollar store ended with the termination of one of the Phoenix officers who responded to the scene.

Iesha Harper, 24, and Dravon Ames, 22, took their daughters - ages 1 and 4 - to the Family Dollar on May 27.

After leaving the store with items they didn't pay for, the couple complained that the police pulled their car over and pointed guns in their faces.

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The store employees had called the cops, saying they believed the family stole items from the store. A worker had observed the 4-year-old girl leaving the store with a doll.

Cell phone video shows the cops pointing guns at the family and ordering them out of their car. The video quickly went viral, and social media activists went nuts. The drama escalated because the family was Black and the cops were Caucasian.

On Tuesday, Phoenix Police Chief Jeri Williams said one of the cops, Officer Christopher Meyer, was notified of his termination.

A disciplinary review board had recommended he receive a 6-week suspension, but Williams, who is Black, said the punishment was "not sufficient to reverse the adverse effects on our department and our community."

"I expect more. You deserve more," she said, according to the NY Daily News. "Unlike other professions, we don't have a luxury of a do-over."

Harper, who was five months pregnant at the time of the incident, approved of Meyer's firing - although she said she had hoped both officers would lose their jobs.

"I think I might be able to get a good night's rest for once knowing that he's fired, and it won't happen to no one else," she said. "I think it's a step in the right direction."

The second officer seen in the video received a reprimand for using foul language.

The family filed a $10 million lawsuit against the city.
 

Kali9/Getty Images

A Georgia sheriff is determined to protect children by putting "no trick-or-treat" signs in the yards of registered sex offenders.

Registered sex offenders in Butts County are suing the Sheriff's Office for putting signs in their yards to discourage young trick-or-treaters, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports.

Christopher Reed, Reginald Holden and Corey McClendon have asked a judge to order the law enforcement agency to stop warning children to avoid their homes on Halloween.

The registered sex offenders say deputies are trespassing on their land to place the unwanted signage.

The lawsuit was filed in U.S. District Court in Macon, Georgia, after Butts County deputies began placing the signs last year.

The signs read: "NO TRICK-OR-TREAT AT THIS ADDRESS!! A COMMUNITY SAFETY MESSAGE FROM BUTTS COUNTY SHERIFF GARY LONG."

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Butts County Sheriff's Office

Sheriff Long reportedly asked 200 sex offenders in the county to display their own signs in their yards, or face unspecified consequences.

A hearing is set for Thursday at 9:30 a.m. for a judge to decide whether the signs violate the rights of sex offenders.

Ariel Skelley/Getty Images

In the meantime, Sheriff Long's deputies will continue to plant signs in the yards of all sex offenders to protect the children in the county.

"Regardless of the Judge's ruling this Thursday, I WILL do everything within the letter of the Law to protect the children of this Community," the sheriff wrote on Facebook.

The lawsuit seeks a jury trial and financial compensation for the stress, fear and humiliation the signs caused last year.

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theAdvocate.com

A Louisiana man was shot dead by an East Feliciana Parish deputy who responded to a burglary call at a Texaco gas station early Monday.

The family of Christopher Whitfield, 31, say he had a history of mental illness and he fled from the cops because he had previous trouble with the law.

The store's owner, Danny Williams, said Whitfield broke into a cooler and stole a box of raw chicken before fleeing the store.

East Feliciana Parish Sheriff's Chief Deputy Greg Phares confirmed the deputy encountered Whitfield behind the gas station and shot him, according to The Advocate.

Whitfield had a previous arrest in 2010 for breaking into the same store.

Phares declined to say if Whitfield was armed with a weapon.

Myrtle Jackson described her grandson as a nice person who didn't carry guns.

"I don't think he should have been shot," she said.

Whitfield's death is the latest fatal shooting of an unarmed Black person by white police officers.

Atatiana Jefferson, 28, of Fort Worth, Texas, was shot and killed by a cop when she looked out her bedroom window after hearing a prowler in her back yard early Saturday.

The cop, 34-year-old Aaron Dean, was arrested and charged with murder hours after he tendered his resignation. He was also dishonorably discharged from the police force.

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Facebook, Fort Worth PD

Aaron Dean, the former Fort Worth, Texas officer who shot 28-year-old Atatiana Jefferson in her own home was bonded out of jail by the police union.

A union official posted 10% of Dean's $200,000 bond on Monday night, less than four hours after he was handcuffed and charged with murder.

Dean, 34, resigned from the force on Monday morning before he could be fired. His resignation is officially listed as a dishonorable discharge.

Dean and another cop responded to a non-emergency call from a neighbor around 2:30 a.m. on Saturday to conduct a welfare check at Jefferson's home because her front door was left open.

The Fort Worth Police Department said the two officers saw someone near a window inside the home and one of the cops drew his weapon and fired because he perceived a threat.

But body cam video shows Dean already had his gun drawn when he approached Jefferson's bedroom window shouting, "Put your hands up! Show me your hands!".

Dean did not give Jefferson enough time to respond to his demands to show her hands.

"Nobody looked at this video and said that there's any doubt that this officer acted inappropriately," said Interim Police Chief Ed Kraus during a press conference to announce Dean's resignation on Monday.

Kraus said, even if Jefferson had a gun in her hand, the mere fact she had a gun shouldn't be considered unusual in Texas.

Texas has had a "castle doctrine" law on the books since 2007 that gives homeowners the right to protect their home with deadly force.

Kraus said he submitted the case to the FBI for a federal investigation. Dean was arrested hours later and charged with murder.

Jefferson was caring for her 8-year-old nephew in her mother's home the night she was killed. Her mother is hospitalized and was not at home at the time of the shooting.

Jefferson worked in pharmaceutical equipment sales and was considering going to medical school, according to the family’s lawyer, S. Lee Merritt.

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Google Maps

The Fort Worth, Texas cop who shot Atatiana Jefferson in her own home has resigned from the police force. Interim Police Chief Ed Kraus identified the cop as Officer Aaron Dean at a press conference on Monday afternoon.

Kraus announced Dean's resignation, saying he intended to fire the rookie cop for violating use-of-force policy and "unprofessional conduct."

"Had the officer not resigned, I would have fired him for violations for several policies, including our use of force policy, our de-escalation policy and unprofessional conduct," Kraus said.

 

Civic leaders praised the Fort Worth Police Department for its quick action and transparency in the wrongful death case.

Dean, who joined the department in April 2018, still faces criminal charges as well as possible civil rights violations, Kraus said, according to NBC News.

Jefferson, 28, was gunned down by Dean as she peered out her bedroom window after hearing what she thought was a prowler in her yard early Saturday.

Dean shot Jefferson through her bedroom window because he "perceived a threat." Police did not clarify the threat.

Body cam video footage showed Dean and another officer circling Jefferson's home after responding to a non-emergency welfare check call.

 

Jefferson's 8-year-old nephew was in Jefferson's bedroom playing a video game when they thought they heard a prowler in the backyard, said the family's attorney S. Lee Merritt.

"They looked at each other and listened more intently when they heard it again," Merritt said in a social media post. "Someone was outside."

Merritt said the nephew described how his aunt went to the window to see who was there.

"Suddenly a man's voice was screaming something he couldn't make out, and then 'bang,'" Merritt said. Jefferson fell to the floor. Merritt said he didn't ask the child what he saw next because he didn't want him "to have to relive that" moment.

Legal experts say the rookie cop didn't give Jefferson enough time to react to his orders before he shot her through the bedroom window.

Twitter activist Shaun King accused Fort Worth police of giving the killer cop special treatment.

"We've been told that the @FortWorthPD has been deliberately hiding the name of the officer who murdered #AtatianaJefferson so that he can wipe all of his social media clean," King tweeted on Sunday. "Not one single justifiable reason exists for hiding his identity."

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Google Maps

Atatiana Jefferson's 8-year-old nephew described the moments before his aunt was fatally shot by a Forth Worth cop early Saturday.

Jefferson, 28, was gunned down by a rookie cop as she peered out her bedroom window after hearing what she thought was a prowler in her yard.

Fort Worth police say the unidentified cop shot Jefferson through her bedroom window because he "perceived a threat." Police did not clarify the threat.

 

Twitter activist Shaun King tweeted that Fort Worth police are giving the killer cop special treatment.

"We've been told that the @FortWorthPD has been deliberately hiding the name of the officer who murdered #AtatianaJefferson so that he can wipe all of his social media clean," King tweeted on Sunday. "Not one single justifiable reason exists for hiding his identity."

The 8-year-old boy was in Jefferson's bedroom playing a video game when they thought they heard a prowler in the backyard, said the family's attorney S. Lee Merritt.

"They looked at each other and listened more intently when they heard it again," Merritt said in a social media post. "Someone was outside."

Merritt said the nephew described how his aunt went to the window to see who was there.

"Suddenly a man's voice was screaming something he couldn't make out, and then 'bang,'" Merritt said. Jefferson fell to the floor. Merritt said he didn't ask the child what he saw next because he didn't want him "to have to relive that" moment.

"I'm hurt. I'm angry. I'm a little afraid when I'm honest," Merritt said. "I hate this happened to (the nephew). I hate it happened to Tay and her beautiful family. This has to stop now. Enough."

Jefferson was killed after next-door neighbor James Smith, 62, called a non-emergency number to request a welfare check because his neighbor's front door was wide open at 2:30 a.m.

The boy told Merritt they left the door open to get some fresh air and they lost track of time.

Two officers arrived six minutes later and walked around the exterior of the house.

Smith said he heard police shout "Put your hands up, show me your hands!" before hearing a single gunshot.

Body cam video shows Jefferson didn't have enough time to react to the cop's orders before he opened fire through her bedroom window.

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Facebook.com

Jefferson lived in the home with her mother who is hospitalized and wasn't at home at the time of the shooting.

Jefferson, who was black, worked as a pharmaceutical sales representative. The cop, who is white, was on the police force for only 18 months. He is currently on paid leave.

The college graduate's case is being compared to that of Botham Jean, who was killed in his own apartment by former Dallas cop Amber Guyger on Sept. 6, 2018.

Guyger, 31, was convicted of murder and sentenced to 10 years in prison earlier this month.

Merritt said the cop who shot Jefferson did not identify himself as a police officer before he fired.

"As if killing this gentle sister wasn't enough, I ask myself what would have happened if (the nephew) was the one to look out the window," Merritt said on social media. "Why is this a reality at all for either of them? I am truly heartbroken by this. We must have justice quickly. It cannot wait."

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Facebook.com

The father of a 28-year-old Texas woman who was fatally shot by a rookie cop is comparing his daughter's wrongful death to Botham Jean, the 26-year-old account who was killed in his apartment by a cop.

Atatiana Jefferson's father, Marquis Jefferson, said his daughter didn't have time to react to a cop's orders before she was shot through her bedroom window early Saturday morning.

Marquis Jefferson was inconsolable after receiving the call that his daughter was killed.

As Atatiana's name trended on Twitter.com all weekend, Marquis told KTXA, "My daughter was 28 years old, had her whole life in front of her.

"You have to know this is somebody's daughter. Somebody loved her. There was a better way. It didn't have to be like that."

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Facebook.com

Jefferson's family said she was playing video games with her young nephew before she was shot. Jefferson and her nephew thought they heard a prowler outside before she walked to her bedroom window to look out.

The family has retained attorney Lee Merritt who also represents Botham Jean's family.

According to published reports, two cops responded to a non-emergency 911 call placed by next door neighbor James Smith, 62, who asked police to conduct a welfare check after noticing Jefferson's front door was open at 2:30 a.m.

The two officers observed the open front door, but rather than knock or identify themselves as police officers, they conducted a search of the property at the back of the house.

Body cam video released by the Fort Worth Police Department shows the cop shining a flashlight around the darkened exterior of the home.

At one point the cop was startled by Jefferson who looked out her bedroom window. The cop, without identifying himself, shouted "Put your hands up! Show me your hands!" before firing through the closed window, striking Jefferson and killing her.

Legal experts say the fact that the cop shouted "show me your hands" before firing a split second later is sufficient proof that he did not see Jefferson's hands before he fired. Nor did he give Jefferson sufficient time to react to his orders.

 

The edited police video shows still photos taken of a handgun presumably located inside Jefferson's bedroom after she was shot. According to Texas law, Jefferson was within her rights to keep a gun to protect her home.

The college graduate's case is being compared to that of Botham Jean, who was killed in his own apartment by former Dallas cop Amber Guyger on Sept. 6, 2018.

Guyger, 31, was convicted of murder and sentenced to 10 years in prison earlier this month.

"Unlike this Botham Jean, I don't want no hug," Marquis Jefferson said, referring to the infamous hug Guyger received from trial judge Tammy Kemp after she was found guilty. "That's my one and only daughter. I will never forget that," Jefferson said.

Smith says he regrets calling the police to conduct a welfare check on his neighbor.

He said Jefferson was a good neighbor who lived with her 8-year-old nephew and an older woman, who was in the hospital.

"I'm shaken. I'm mad. I'm upset. And I feel it's partly my fault," Smith said. "If I had never dialed the police department, she'd still be alive."

The officer has been placed on paid administrative leave pending the outcome of an investigation into the shooting.

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St. Louis PD, GoFundMe

A St. Louis, Missouri cop who was arrested for killing his fellow officer during a game of Russian roulette may have forced the woman to participate in the dangerous game.

Nathaniel Hendren is accused of fatally shooting fellow police officer Katlyn Alix in the early morning hours of Jan. 24, according to PEOPLE.

Alix, 24, and Hendren, 29, were allegedly drinking in Hendren's apartment when the gun went off, killing Alix.

According to a probable cause statement obtained by PEOPLE, Hendren emptied the gun before putting "one cartridge back into the cylinder."

The two then took turns pointing the gun at each other and pulling the trigger, the probable cause statement says.

At one point, Hendren pointed the gun at Alix and the gun discharged, striking her in the chest, the report says.

Alix, a patrol officer in her second year on the force, was pronounced dead upon arrival at a hospital.

Hendren's law enforcement partner, Patrick Riordan, who was also in the apartment that morning, were both on duty when Alix was killed. Alix was off-duty.

Alix's mother Aimee Lynn Wahlers, filed a wrongful death lawsuit in St. Louis Circuit Court on Wednesday.

The lawsuit alleges that Hendren forced other women to play the deadly game in the past, the AP and the St. Louis Post-Dispatch report.

The lawsuit also alleges Hendren forced ex-girlfriends to engage in sexual activity that involved firearms, the suit says.

Wahlers says the city should have known that Hendren allegedly had a psychiatric history before hiring him, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports.

Hendren, who is free on $100K bond, pleaded not guilty to first-degree manslaughter. He has been suspended from the police force and is currently awaiting trial.

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Dallas County Jail

Former Dallas cop Amber Guyger will spend the next 10 years behind bars for fatally shooting her upstairs neighbor Botham Jean, 26.

Guyger, 31, was found guilty of murder on Tuesday, Oct. 1, for fatally shooting Jean in his own apartment on Sept. 6, 2018. The jury didn't buy her claim that she believed he was an intruder in her apartment.

The sentencing phase of Guyger's murder trial began on Tuesday afternoon.

Prosecutors showed jurors racist text messages and social media memes by Guyger.

One text message was in reference to the Jan. 15, 2018 Martin Luther King Jr. holiday parade in Dallas, according to ABC affiliate WFAA 8 News.

"When does this end lol," a fellow cop texted Guyger.

"When MLK is dead… oh wait…" she responded.

"Just push them… or spray your pepper spray in that general area," she wrote, referring to the majority Black crowd at the parade.

Prosecutors had asked jurors to sentence Guyger to at least 28 years — symbolic because Jean would have turned 28 last Sunday, according to NBC News.

Guyger did not testify during the sentencing phase.

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Dallas County Jail

Former Dallas cop Amber Guyger was convicted of murder in the fatal shooting of her neighbor, Botham Jean, in his own home.

A new mugshot was taken when Guyger was booked into the Dallas County Jail on Tuesday, following her conviction.

She will be held in jail until her sentencing hearing. She will then be transported to prison. The former cop was not allowed to post bond while her attorneys appeal her conviction.

The sentencing phase of Guyger's murder trial began on Tuesday afternoon.

Jurors heard from Jean's still-grieving mother and sister, who talked about his good character, his strong religious upbringing, and his life of service to others.

Prosecutors showed jurors racist text messages and social media posts written by Guyger, 31.

One text message was in reference to the Jan. 15, 2018 Martin Luther King Jr. holiday parade in Dallas, according to ABC affiliate WFAA 8 News.

"When does this end lol," a fellow cop texted Guyger.

"When MLK is dead… oh wait…" she responded.

"Just push them… or spray your pepper spray in that general area," she wrote, referring to the majority Black crowd at the parade.

In another text exchange, dated Sept. 4, 2018, someone texted Guyger about adopting a German Shepherd.

"Although she may be racist," the dog’s owner messaged Guyger.

"It's okay.. I'm the same," Guyger responded.

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WFAA.com

The jury will take Guyger's racist texts into consideration when deciding her punishment. Jurors will consider whether her racism was a factor when she shot Jean in cold blood in his apartment on Sept. 6, 2018.

Guyger faces a maximum of 99 years behind bars.

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Amber Guyger was found guilty of murder on Tuesday for fatally shooting her neighbor, Botham Jean, after she claimed she thought he was an intruder in her own apartment.

A jury of her own peers convicted the 31-year-old former cop after deliberating on Tuesday, Oct. 1.

Jean, a 26-year-old accountant at PricewaterhouseCoopers, was sitting on his sofa eating ice cream when Guyger entered his apartment and opened fire.

Her attorney claimed she was tired after working a 13-hour shift. But the prosecutor said she was distracted by steamy text messages from her police officer boyfriend.

In tearful testimony on the witness stand, Guyger claimed she feared for her life after Jean refused to obey her orders to raise his hands.

She said he yelled, "Hey hey hey!" And she fired twice to neutralize the perceived threat.

But the jury didn't buy her tears.

Guyger broke down and cried again when the guilty verdict was read.

Jean's family celebrated in the hall outside the courtroom, as supporters cheered, "It's a new day!"

The jury was given three options: murder, manslaughter (which carried the lightest sentence), or acquittal.

Guyger faces 99 years in prison when she is sentenced on Tuesday.

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CBS Evening News

Amber Guyger, the former Dallas cop who fatally shot her unarmed Black neighbor in his own apartment, cried on the witness stand on day 5 of her murder trial.

Guyger, 31, claims she was "scared to death" when she shot Botham Jean twice as he stood up from the sofa when she entered his apartment on the night of Sept. 6, 2018.

She cried while defense attorney Toby Shook questioned her about the events that led up to the shooting.

Guyger testified that she believed a stranger was inside her own apartment when she arrived home after working a 13-hour shift.

"I was scared to death," Guyger said, adding that her "heart rate just skyrocketed."

The Dallas native said she "never wanted to take an innocent person's life."

Guyger then reenacted how she arrived at the apartment on the 4th floor - one floor above her own.

She testified that when she put the key into the lock she noticed the door was ajar. She then saw the silhouette of a figure and pulled out her gun and yelled, "Let me see your hands! Let me see hands!" she said.

She said she saw the figure move and that Jean yelled "Hey! Hey! Hey!" in an "aggressive" voice.

"I was scared he was going to kill me," she testified.

Prosecutors say Guyger was so distracted by steamy text messages from her police officer lover that she didn't notice Jean was sitting in his own living room eating a bowl of ice cream.

Dallas Det. Stephen Clearly also pointed out that Guyger's apartment had photos hanging on a wall, a bookshelf in the corner and a small table with a vase of flowers against the wall. Jean's apartment had art hanging on the wall behind the couch, an ottoman in the living room and a workstation set up near the bar.

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Black Twitter expressed outrage over a Texas Ranger's testimony in defense of former cop Amber Guyger who is on trial for murdering Botham Jean in his own apartment.

After working a 13-hour shift on Sept. 6, 2018, Guyger, 31, parked on the wrong floor and claimed she entered the wrong apartment under the belief that it was her own.

But prosecutors say Guyger was distracted by steamy text messages from her lover when she entered Jean's apartment located directly above her apartment.

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YouTube.com

Texas Ranger Sgt. David Armstrong took the witness stand and said the former Dallas police officer did not commit a crime when she entered Jean's apartment and shot him dead.

"I don't believe that (the shooting) was reckless or criminally negligent based on the totality of the investigation and the circumstances and facts," he said earlier this week.

 

Armstrong claimed the evidence shows Guyger had access to Jean's apartment because his door was ajar.

"On multiple occasions, the door would close all the way and the door would also not completely close depending on the distance. And we were just letting go of the door not using any force and sometimes it would close all the way sometimes it wouldn't, depending on the distance."

But neighbors posted videos on social media that showed their apartment doors closing completely and locking automatically when they let go.

Armstrong also explained Guyger's mental state when she confronted Jean in the living room of his own apartment.

"Physically your heart rate goes very, very high," said Armstrong. "Your vision becomes narrowed, which is commonly referred to as tunnel vision. You begin to think very, very quickly and because your vision is narrowing, you begin to concentrate on what you believe your threat is … and that's due to blood rushing to the major organs of the body because your body is saying ‘I need to do this right now,' which is either fight or flight."

Prosecutor Jason Hermus objected to the testimony, saying Armstrong was not qualified to speak to Guyger's state of mind.

"What Ranger Armstrong believes is Ranger Armstrong's opinion. His opinion and belief doesn't help the jury. … The fact that he believes something based on evidence doesn’t mean the jury is going to believe the same thing."

According to published reports, Armstrong also has blood on his hands. He was previously investigated for killing a man while driving twice the speed limit. Armstrong was never tried in that case.

A lawsuit stated the accident would not have occurred if Armstrong was driving the legal speed limit.

Black Twitter reacted strongly to Armstrong's testimony in Guyger's defense.

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Former Dallas police officer Amber Guyger's murder trial is underway in a Dallas, Texas courtroom.

Guyger, 31, is accused of fatally shooting Botham Jean after she entered his apartment under the mistaken belief that she was in her own apartment.

The former officer wore a modest blue dress on the first day of her murder trial on Monday.

After working a 13-hour shift, Guyger parked her car on the wrong floor and entered Jean's apartment through an unlocked door on Sept. 6, 2018.

According to her defense team, Jean, who was seated on his sofa eating a bowl of ice cream, was shot and killed when he refused her orders.

But prosecutors say Guyger was distracted by steamy text messages she exchanged with her lover, a fellow Dallas police officer.

The prosecutor argued that Guyger walked past 16 other apartments on the 4th floor and failed to notice she was not on the 3rd floor where her apartment was located directly under Jean's.

Dallas County Assistant District Attorney Jason Hermus said Guyger was also on the phone with her lover, Officer Martin Rivera, when she pulled into her apartment complex.

Hermus said Guyger sent a Snapchat message to Rivera at about 9:30 p.m. which read, "wanna touch," according to the Dallas Morning News. Earlier in the day, she texted Rivera that she was "super horny today," according to the prosecutor.

On the witness stand, Rivera testified he had a 16-minute phone conversation with Guyger as she drove home. He denied making plans with her for later that night.

Rivera, who was in a relationship with another woman, said he and Guyger were no longer lovers at the time.

Defense lawyer Robert Rogers said Guyger didn't notice the wrong number on the apartment door when she walked in and encountered Jean on his sofa in the darkened apartment.

"What was going through Amber's mind was just, 'I'm going home,'" Rogers said, according to the Morning News. "'I'm done with my day of work, I'm exhausted and I'm going home.'"

Rogers said Guyger, who is white, shot Jean, who is Black, in self-defense because she mistakenly believed she was in her own apartment.

"'Why is he yelling at me? Why is he coming at me? Why is the display of my gun not working? He must have a weapon,'" Rogers said Guyger was thinking. "He must want to kill me because I caught him burglarizing my apartment, and he's getting closer.'"

But Hermus said Guyger was preoccupied with text messages from her former lover when she entered the wrong apartment.

Hermus said Jean, 26, didn't stand a chance.

"No opportunity for de-escalation, no opportunity for him to surrender. Bang, bang. Rapid," Hermus told the jury, according to ABC News.

The jury, which is sequestered, will consider whether Guyger is guilty of murder, manslaughter or acquitted of the charges.

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WFLA TV

The school resource officer who arrested two minor children at an Orlando elementary school has been fired.

Officer Dennis L. Tuner was initially suspended from the Orlando Police Department after he arrested a 6-year-old girl for kicking another student at Lucious and Emma Nixon Academy Charter school on Thursday.

When the child was taken to the provincial's office, she screamed and kicked Officer Turner, who was the school's resource officer.

The child was handcuffed and taken to the Juvenile Assessment detention center where she was booked and had her mugshot taken. She was charged with battery on an officer of the law.

The 6-year-old's grandmother complained to the local news media that her granddaughter was arrested for "throwing a tantrum at school."

Meralyn Kirkland says her granddaughter was acting up in school because she was "sleep deprived."

She said when she told the officer her granddaughter had a sleep disorder, he replied, "Well, I have sleep apnea, and I don't behave like that."

When the story initially broke, Officer Turner was misidentified as a white officer - which furled the backlash on social media.

CBS News reports Turner, who was suspended after the incident, was fired on Monday.

At a press conference on Monday, Orlando Police Chief Orlando Rolón apologized to the children and their families.

He explained his decision to fire Turner in a post on the OPD Twitter page.

Later that day, Turner arrested an 8-year-old boy in a separate incident at the same elementary School.

Turner was fired after 23 years on the force.

Turner's supporters say he only "arrested" the children to teach them a lesson, but social media has an annoying habit of demonizing people with good intentions.

This is an open post where you can discuss any subject matter. This post will not be censored or moderated. Disqus may automatically moderate certain words considered offensive. There are no rules in Open Posts. So enter at your own risk.

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Yonkers Police

An off-duty NYPD sergeant was arrested for shoplifting garments from a Macy's store in Yonkers, NY.

Sergeant Eva Pena, 37, was arrested after she allegedly stole six garments from the Macy's store. She was stopped by a female security guard after she left the store with the items in her purse.

The curvy, 5-foot-4 sergeant recently posed with police commissioner James O'Neill at a police event. She wore a tight skirt and sequined cutout top that struggled to contain her size DD cup bust.

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Yonkers Police

After her arrest, Pena was suspended from her beat patrolling the Housing Authority in the Bronx.

An internal report detailed how store security caught Pena removing tags from items and stuffing the clothing into her purse.

"A female identified as Sergeant Eva Pena was observed on store surveillance removing price tags from merchandise, which she then placed six clothing items into her purse and attempted to walk out of Macy's without making payment."

A female security officer followed Pena outside the store and searched her purse where she found the stolen items. Pena was immediately placed under arrest.

Some of the items were lingerie. Pena often posts photos of herself in lingerie and skimpy panties on her social media accounts.

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Instagram.com

Copyright Disclaimer: I do not own the rights to the photograph(s) used in this post. Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act of 1976, allowance is made for "fair use” of photographs for purposes such as parody, criticism, commentary, news reporting, education, and research.

Spencer Platt/Getty Images

The New York Police Department has fired Officer Daniel Pantaleo, 5 Years after he killed 43-year-old Eric Garner while making an arrest for selling bootleg cigarettes on the street. The job termination comes a month after federal prosecutors announced no charges would be filed against Pantaleo in Garner's murder.

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