Photo may have been deleted

Screengrab: YouTube

Trump supporter and conservative activist Kingface has passed away at age 38. Kingface, real name Larry Henry, was hospitalized months ago with an acute kidney infection.

The community activist slipped into a coma in a New York City hospital. He died on Tuesday, September 29.

Henry's fellow conservative Rob Smith confirmed Henry's death in a Facebook post.

Fellow activist Bryson Gray tweeted: "RIP TO KINGFACE. One of the realest people I've ever met. He was the first person in the MAGA movement to post my music on Instagram. His video is the reason I bought the 'Big MAGA hat'. He was the first person to let me perform with him during blexit. RIP."

Henry is survived by his wife, Marion Krouser. An ex-girlfriend claimed she contracted HIV from Henry.

Boston Globe via Getty Images

Scroll down for updates...

President Donald Trump's son, Eric Trump shocked the world when he apparently came out as "part of the LGBT community".

No one was prepared for the stunning revelation when Eric came out during an appearance on "Fox & Friends" on Tuesday morning.

"The LGBT community, they are incredible. And you should see how they come out in full force for my father every single day. I'm part of that community, and we love the man," Eric said.

Some believe Eric was simply quoting what others say to him.

The LGBT community was sent reeling after Eric dropped a bombshell on Fox News. Some suggested that Eric made a Freudian slip -- something he was thinking but he never meant to say out loud.

Eric Trump is married to wife, Lara, since 2014. They share two children - a son, Eric Luke, 3, and daughter Carolina, 13 months.

LGBT journalist Erica Lenti was not impressed: "the gay committee, have had an emergency meeting and we have rejected Eric Trump's application."

And LGBT singer Simon Curtis said, "Eric Trump coming out on Fox News is not what I expected from the timeline this morning."

Galella Collection via Getty Images

12-year-old Eric is pictured far left with his siblings at his father's 50th birthday party on June 13, 1996. Also pictured is Trump's ex-wife Marla Maples (right).

Eric, a 36-year-old Capricorn, was raised in a loving, two-parent household with his siblings Ivanka, 38, and Donald Jr., 42. He also has a half-sister, Tiffany, 26, and a 14-year-old brother, Barron Trump.

Update:

Eric Trump clarified that he is not "part of the LGBT community".

Eric told The NY Post he was paraphrasing what LGBT Trump supporters told him about his father.

"To clarify, many of our close friends are part of the LGBT community, which was the intent of my statement — the left has taken that vote for granted for a long time and support from the gay community for my father is incredible."

Tom Brenner/Getty Images

Brad Parscale, former campaign manager for President Donald Trump's 2020 re-election, was hospitalized after he threatened to harm himself on Sunday.

Ft. Lauderdale, Florida responded to a 911 call from Parscale's wife, Candice, who said Parscale was armed and threatened suicide. When police arrived on the scene in the affluent Seven Isles community, Parscale reportedly "barricaded" himself inside his home.

Fort Lauderdale Police Chief Karen Dietrich said Parscale was involuntarily committed to a psych ward under Florida's Baker Act, which allows police to commit people who are a danger to themselves or others.

She said he did not threaten police and he went "willingly" with police.

"We went out and it was very short. We went and got him help," Dietrich said, according to the South Florida Sun Sentinel.

Parscale's fall from grace began in June when he was outwitted by TikTok teenagers who registered online by the thousands to attend Trump's campaign rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Parscale embarrassed and humiliated his boss when he tweeted that he had received over 1 million requests for tickets to the Tulsa rally, but more than half the seats were empty at the 19,000-seat arena.

The teens took to TikTok to brag that they intentionally registered thousands of tickets online so Trump's supporters couldn't get tickets.

Parscale was also investigated for allegedly "mismanaging" over $40 million in Trump campaign funds.

More than $800,000 was spent on "boosting" Parscale's social media pages, and $39 million was transferred to two companies owned by Parscale.

On July 15, Trump tweeted that Parscale was demoted and would be replaced by Bill Stepien, but Parscale would continue to advise the campaign.

Parscale is currently serving as senior adviser for data and digital operations for Trump's 2020 presidential re-election campaign.

Mark Wilson/Getty Images

The New York Times published an exposé on Sunday, alleging that President Donald Trump committed "income tax avoidance" in 2016 and 2017. Trump called the exposé "fake news."

The paper claims Trump paid only $750 in income taxes in those years.

Unlike income tax evasion, income come tax avoidance is totally legal. Millions of Americans pay accountants to help them avoid paying taxes via tax write offs and deductions.

In Trump's case, he took advantage of an exploit in then-President Barack Obama's 2009 stimulus policy that wipes out taxes going back two years. In November 2009, the window was further opened another two years to wipe out taxes going back four years.

"Mr. Trump had paid no income taxes in 2008," according to the National Review. "But the change meant that when he filed his taxes for 2009, he could seek a refund of not just the $13.3 million he had paid in 2007, but also the combined $56.9 million paid in 2005 and 2006..."

Photo may have been deleted

Bloomberg.com

This is not the first time the NYT has analyzed Trump's taxes. In 2016, the paper obtained Trump's 1995 tax return from an anonymous source.

The 1995 tax return showed Trump declared a $916 million loss. Tax laws allow such losses to be carried forward for many years -- offsetting taxes owed on future income.

Trump lost so much money in 1990 and 1991 - $250 million - that he didn't have to pay taxes for the next 8 years.

This is the so-called "income tax avoidance" that the Times claims Trump committed.

From 2005-2007 Trump paid a total of $70.1 million in income taxes. Trump actually paid more income tax than Amazon's Jeff Bezos, the richest man in America.

Like most Americans, Trump doesn't file his own taxes. He has a team of corporate accountants who file his taxes for him. Then another team of tax lawyers pore over the documents to make sure all tax laws, income and deductions are reported accurately.

The Times didn't find anything illegal in Trump's tax returns in 1995, 2016 or 2017. They even noted that all "questioners" looking for a smoking gun in Trump's Tax returns will be "unfulfilled".

Ironically, the New York Times paid no income tax last year.

Alex Wong/Getty Images

President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump stopped by the Supreme Court to pay their respects to former Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died after a prolonged battle with pancreatic cancer.

Trump and Ginsburg's relationship was tense and she reportedly said he would not complete his first term in office while she was alive.

Photo may have been deleted

Getty Images

Trump and his wife donned cloth face coverings as they stood at the top of the steps flanking Ginsburg's flag-draped coffin, their heads bowed in prayer on Thursday morning.

Alex Brandon-Pool/Getty Images

But the somber moment was punctuated by booing and jeering from thousands of mourners who lined up to view Ginsburg's casket.

"Honor her wish!" they yelled, in reference to the alleged deathbed statement asking to delay filling her seat until 2021.

"My most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed," Ginsburg allegedly told her grand daughter.

"Vote him out," the crowd chanted. There were also shouts of "Breonna Taylor," in reference to the 29-year-old EMT who was killed when plainclothes officers served a drug warrant at her apartment on March 13.

One officer was charged with shooting into a nearby apartment. But there were no charges directly related to Breonna's death.

The Grand Jury's decision sparked renewed rioting and violence in the streets of Louisville, Kentucky on Wednesday. Two Louisville police officers were wounded by gunfire. One man is in custody. The two officers are expected to survive.

Meanwhile, President Trump will announce his Supreme Court pick on Saturday. Topping the list is Amy Coney Barrett, a circuit judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit in New Orleans, and a devout Catholic.

Photo may have been deleted

Facebook

The 48-year-old married mom of two was appointed to the bench by Trump in 2017.

Vice President Mike Pence told ABC News Wednesday that he considers Barrett's strong religious values an asset, rather than a liability.

Trump has the 50 Senate votes he needs to confirm his Supreme Court pick, meaning Ginsburg's seat will be filled before the elections in November.

Washington Post via Getty Images

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg has died. Ginsberg died of metastatic pancreatic cancer at her Washington, D.C. home on Friday, surrounded by members of her family. She was 87.

Ginsberg had twice been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and also underwent lung surgery in 2018 to remove cancerous growths.

Ginsberg revealed she was battling cancer again after she was discharged from Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington, D.C. in July. She was admitted into a New York City hospital weeks later for a routine non-surgical procedure to correct a bile stent.

She was last seen in public in August when she officiated a friend's outdoor wedding.

Ginsberg was the first female Jewish Justice, and the second of four women to ever sit on the nation's highest court.

She was nominated to the Supreme Court by President Bill Clinton on June 14, 1993 and had served since August 10, 1993. Ginsburg became the second of four female justices to be confirmed to the Court after Sandra Day O'Connor, the two others being Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan, both of whom are still serving in 2020.

Following O'Connor's retirement in 2006 and until Sotomayor joined the Court in 2009, Ginsberg was the only female justice on the Supreme Court.

During three separate interviews that were conducted in July 2016, Ginsburg criticized presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, telling The New York Times and the Associated Press that she did not want to think about the possibility of a Trump presidency.

She is survived by her daughter, Jane, and her son, James. Her husband of 56 years, Martin, died in 2010.

Mario Tama/Getty Images

The White House will begin blocking app downloads of TikTok and WeChat starting this Sunday, Sept. 20, Tech Crunch reports.

The U.S. Commerce Department will enforce shutdowns of TikTok and WeChat, after President Donald Trump announced plans in August to ban the apps in this country amid security concerns.

Despite the ban on TikTok downloads this Sunday, a November 12 reprieve gives Chinese-owned TikTok until after the election to complete a complicated purchase deal with Oracle, Walmart and their partners without an interruption in service.

According to Businessinsider.com, "Oracle would own a minority stake in TikTok of less than 20%, while Walmart is also expected to take a stake in the popular social media company."

Walmart CEO Doug McMillion would likely have a seat on a new US board of directors for TikTok's American operations, CNBC reported.

"Today's actions prove once again that President Trump will do everything in his power to guarantee our national security and protect Americans from the threats of the Chinese Communist Party," said Department of Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross in a statement.

"At the President's direction, we have taken significant action to combat China's malicious collection of American citizens' personal data, while promoting our national values, democratic rules-based norms, and aggressive enforcement of U.S. laws and regulations."

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Trump supporters are convinced that Joe Biden's coughing fits during campaign stops in Detroit means he will call out sick before debates.

On Wednesday, Sept. 9, Biden visited Detroit, Michigan -- one of the swing states he needs to defeat Trump in November.

While Trump holds massive rallies around the country, Biden prefers small intimate gatherings of five or six supporters and friendly journalists in attendance.

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Biden spoke with members of the United Steelworkers union in a supporter's back yard on Wednesday. The 77-year-old Democratic presidential nominee began experiencing coughing fits.

Biden also coughed a dozen times while speaking at another campaign stop in Michigan.

He pulled down his black face mask down and touched his nose -- against the CDC's advice not to touch the face to avoid contracting the virus from contaminated hands.

Trump supporters believe Biden's coughing fits are proof that his team will say he is too sick to debate with Trump. The first debate is scheduled for the end of this month.
 

Photo may have been deleted

Getty Images

Journalist Bob Woodward claims President Donald Trump downplayed the seriousness of the coronavirus during a phone call.

In February, Trump spoke to Woodward who was doing research for his latest book, Rage. Woodward claimed Trump downplayed the threat of the coronavirus at the time to prevent the public from panicking.

Democrats reacted with outrage to the leaked audio, saying Trump "intentionally" mislead the general public about the virus that originated in Wuhan, China in December.

AFP via Getty Images

On the campaign trail in Michigan, Joe Biden told auto workers that Trump "lied" about the seriousness of the coronavirus pandemic, saying Trump's admission was "a life and death betrayal of the American people."

But Dr. Anthony Fauci, who heads the White Task Force on the coronavirus, told Fox News: "I don't think [Trump] ever distorted things that I spoke to him about."

Fauci added: "I don't think he said much different than what we said [to him] when we were in the Oval Office."

The White House Task Force held daily press briefings and Fauci even predicted that "millions" of Americans would die from the virus.

On Jan. 30, Trump told his supporters at a rally in Des Moines, Iowa, "We're working with China just so you know, and other countries very, very closely, so it doesn't get out of hand, but it's something that we have to be very, very careful with, right? We have to be very careful.

AFP via Getty Images

1,000 Georgia residents who were caught double-voting in Georgia's primary could face felony charges and jail time.

Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger said Tuesday that his office would investigate and, if appropriate, bring charges against anyone who voted twice in June.

Residents who were caught double-voting had cast their vote by mail and then in person on the day of the election.

"A double voter knows exactly what they’re doing, diluting the votes of each and every voter that follows the law," Raffensperger told reporters on Tuesday. "Those that make the choice to game the system are breaking the law. And as secretary of state, I will not tolerate it."

Raffensperger, a Republican, said there weren't enough double-votes to change the outcome of the primary elections.

Win McNamee/Getty Images

President Trump and other Republicans warned of the potential for voter fraud with mail-in ballots. But Scott Hogan, executive director of the Democratic Party of Georgia, dismissed any suggestion of voter fraud.

Hogan said voter fraud is rare and he accused Raffensperger of wasting the taxpayer's time investigating double-voters.

"It is clear that rather than do his job of promoting the safety and security of our voting process, the secretary of state is instead pushing the GOP’s voting conspiracy theories and disinformation," Hogan said.

FayesVision/WENN.com

Kamala Harris refuses to say whether she would take the RNA vaccine if it becomes available in October or November.

President Trump has insisted a vaccine will be available by the end of the year, and potentially before the November 3 elections.

"It will be delivered before the end of the year, in my opinion, before the end of the year, but it really might even be delivered before the end of October," Trump said Thursday. "How do you like that? Wouldn't that be nice?"

But the Democratic vice presidential candidate said she doesn't trust Trump's word on the safety or efficacy of a vaccine that was rushed through three years' worth of clinical trials in a matter of months.

FayesVision/WENN.com

In an interview with CNN, Harris said, "I would not trust Donald Trump and it would have to be a credible source of information that talks about the efficacy and the reliability of whatever he's talking about. I will not take his word for it."

Alarm bells went off when the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) sent letters to governors in every state requesting that states consider "waiving requirements" to allow vaccine distribution sites to be fully operational by November 1st.

Unlike normal vaccines, RNA vaccines are "encoded" with genetic "instructions" that tell your cells what to do.

Many Americans expressed concern that the CDC might be subjecting them to a potentially harmful vaccine.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, who sits on the White House Coronavirus Task Force, doesn't share their concern.

In an interview with Kaiser Health News earlier this week, Fauci said that Phase Three of the clinical trials could end earlier than expected, if the results prove "overwhelmingly positive."

Fauci told the publication that the Data and Safety Monitoring Board had a "moral obligation" to end the third phase of clinical trials early if the results were significant.

"I'm not concerned about political pressure," he added.

Fully one third of Americans say they would refuse the RNA vaccination even if it was deemed safe by the FDA and distributed to all 50 states before the election.

Photo may have been deleted

Screengrab: YouTube

Michael Forest Reinoehl was a free man living in Washington state after he shot and killed a Trump supporter in Portland, Oregon last week.

Footage captured by a witness shows Reinoehl shoot Aaron 'Jay' Danielson in the back during Antifa protests in Portland on Aug. 29.

Danielson was a Blue Lives Matter activist and Trump supporter.

Internet collective 4chan identified Reinoehl before Portland police even knew his name.

Reinoehl was on the lam from the law but he wasn't exactly hiding in the woods.

Reinoehl was living in a Washington state apartment complex with friends. He didn't try to conceal his identity. He even gave an interview to VICE magazine in which he blamed the victim fo this own demise.

Trump supporters expressed outrage that law enforcement weren't trying very hard to capture the fugitive.

As the days went by, with police making no arrest, President Trump fired off a tweet demanding action immediately.

"Why aren't the Portland Police ARRESTING the cold blooded killer of Aaron "Jay" Danielson. Do your job, and do it fast. Everybody knows who this thug is. No wonder Portland is going to hell! @TheJusticeDept @FBI."

The end came for Reinoehl as he walked to a mailbox cluster in his apartment complex to pick up his mail on Thursday, Sept. 3.

Agents with the U.S. Marshals Service were waiting to ambush him at the mailbox, but Reinoehl saw them first and let off about 40 rounds from a semi-automatic rifle. He was cut down by a volley of gunfire and died instantly.

Reinoehl's sister gave a statement to London's MailOnline regarding her brother's death: "I wouldn't say at this point that this counts as bad news."

Reinoehl leaves behind a teenage son and an 11-year-old daughter, who was protesting with him when he killed Danielson. The little girl was armed with a baseball bat.

AFP via Getty Images

President Donald Trump has blocked all evictions through the end of the year. Trump’s executive order gives the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) leeway to stop evictions by labeling evictions a health risk.

Robin Gentry / EyeEm

The order helps people who fell behind on their rent because their income was impacted by the coronavirus.

Any landlord who violates the order will face stiff fines at a minimum of $100,000.

Under the executive order, the CDC can use its power as the country's health authority to block all evictions from taking place because of the risk of newly homeless people spreading the virus.

"I want to make it unmistakably clear that I'm protecting people from evictions," Trump said in a statement on Tuesday.

Trump took action after House Democrats and the White House failed to deliver a new stimulus package.

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The order left landlords and home builders angry and threatening to file federal lawsuits as soon as the moratorium takes effect.

Many landlords have already begun filing evictions around the country.

White House deputy press secretary Brian Morgenstern told reporters on Tuesday that the president's executive order signed Tuesday will help millions of Americans stay in their homes.

"Today's announcement means that people struggling to pay rent due to the coronavirus will not have to worry about being evicted and risk further spreading, spreading of, or exposure to the disease due to economic hardship," he said. "The administration has also made funds available to alleviate any economic impact to tenants, landlords, and property owners."

Tom Curtis/WireImage

Musician Eddy Grant is suing President Donald Trump for using his 1982 hit song "Electric Avenue" during a campaign video clip.

The video features an animated train with Trump's campaign logo speeding through a town while Biden follows along in a railroad handcar.

Grant's song plays throughout the duration of the video, which ends with letters spelling out "Biden Train" falling off the screen.

"Electric Avenue" plays in the video clip, which Trump tweeted last month. The video clip garnered 13 million views through Tuesday afternoon.

The campaign removed the video, but the 72-year-old Guyanese-British singer-songwriter filed a lawsuit Tuesday, citing Trump for "continued to willfully and wrongfully infringing Plaintiffs' copyrights."

Grant's lawyer noted "substantial damage and irreparable harm has occurred and will continue to occur to my client and his reputation as an artist not affiliated in any way with your campaign."

The Trump campaign has received warnings and legal action after multiple demands to stop using copyrighted music by other musicians in his campaign rallies.
 

Photo may have been deleted

Screengrab: YouTube/Fox News

Nancy Pelosi is under fire for getting a blowout at a San Francisco hair salon that was shuttered amid the coronavirus.

The House Speaker is seen on leaked surveillance video having her hair done while not wearing a face mask or social distancing - actions she criticized President Trump for just hours after getting her hair done.

Pelosi's team issued a statement on Wednesday, blaming the salon owner for telling Pelosi the city said she could have one client at a time in the salon.

But salon owner Erica Kious disputed that explanation. She said she received a text message from one of the stylists who rents a booth at eSalon, asking her to open the shuttered salon because he had Nancy Pelosi coming in on Sunday.

"I'll be there at 2:45 tomorrow," the stylist texted. "Pelosi assistant just message me to do her hair."

Kious said, "I was like, are you kidding me right now? Do I let this happen? What do I do?"

Overreaching coronavirus restrictions prohibits salons from opening for business in San Francisco.

After seeing Pelosi on surveillance video inside her salon the next day, Kious shared the surveillance footage with Fox News.

"It was a slap in the face that she went in, you know, that she feels that she can just go and get her stuff done while no one else can go in, and I can't work," Kious told Fox.

"We have been shut down for so long, not just me, but most of the small businesses and I just can't – it’s a feeling – a feeling of being deflated, helpless and honestly beaten down," she continued. "I have been fighting for six months for a business that took me 12 years to build to reopen."

The news spread like wildfire under the viral hashtag #Pelosimustgo.

Drew Angerer/Getty Images

President Trump tweeted: "The Beauty Parlor owner must really dislike Crazy Nancy Pelosi. Turning her in, on tape, is a really big deal. She probably treats him like she treats everyone else...And she strongly supported a Kennedy who just lost in, of all places, Massachusetts!"

Voters expressed their frustration with the Democratic Party for shuttering small businesses and ruining the economy just so they can return to power in November.

"The only things that 'matter' to Democrats is money and power," said one frustrated social media user.

@CongressmanHice wrote: There's one set of rules for the liberal elite, and another for the rest of us. Brazen hypocrisy. Double standards. #PelosiMustGo."

@w_terrence tweeted: "Nancy Pelosi think she's more important and better than the American people. She can go to Salons but other people have to stay home and not go to work or church. Raise your hand if you are ready for Pelosi to go!"

Others expressed similar outrage. Twitter marked all of their tweets as "Not helpful."