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Hallmark's decision to pull a commercial showing 2 lesbians kissing triggered outrage on Twitter.com.

The family-oriented network pulled four same-sex commercials after conservative groups launched petitions signed by thousands of concerned parents.

In one ad, two brides kiss after exchanging vows at the altar. One woman wears a wedding dress, the other wears a men's tailored suit.

The commercials were paid for by Zola.com, an inclusive wedding planning company that purchased six ad spots. Four of the 6 ads feature same-sex couples.

A petition created by the conservative group One Million Moms (1MM) garnered over 25,000 signatures. The group's mission is to "fight against indecency".

The organization pleaded with Bill Abbott, CEO of Crown Media Family Networks, Hallmark's parent company.

"Please reconsider airing commercials with the same-sex couples, and please do not add LGBT movies to the Hallmark Channel. Such content goes against Christian and conservative vaults that are important to your primary audience. You will lose viewers if you cave to the LGBT agenda."

The group said the Zola commercials made Hallmark Channel unsafe for family viewing.

A similar petition on Christian website LifesiteNews.com garnered over 50,000 signatures.

It didn't take long for Hallmark to realize the error of its ways.

"We are not allowed to accept creatives that are deemed controversial," said an account rep.

Liberals on Twitter vented their outrage under the hashtag #BoycottHallmarkChannel.

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Valerie Jarrett, who served as the senior advisor to former President Barack Obama, was among the vocal critics.

"Controversial? Really, ?@Hallmark?? What a horrible message you are sending not just to all of the same sex couples and their loved ones, but to everyone. #lovemeanslove."

Television personality Baker Machado tweeted:

"he declined to comment on why a nearly identical ad featuring a bride and groom kissing was not rejected."

Another Twitter user said critics of the ads are "okay with voting for a guy who had sex with Stormy Daniels while his third wife was nursing his infant child..."

But others were pleased with Hallmark's decision.

One user tweeted: "I will not be boycotting Hallmark Channel or their cards. They have [every] right to make their own decision."

Another user tweeted:

"It's the only channel that moms and dads don't have to monitor for sex or violence or 4 letter words. Leave Hallmark alone, same sex couples are a fact of life."

 

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Feminists are outraged after Proctor & Gamble removed feminine symbols from packages and pad wrappers of Always menstruation products.

Procter & Gamble, makers of Always, announced the change on Monday after transgender activists demanded the removal of the female Venus symbol from all menstruation products.

The company took action after a few female-to-male (FTM) transgenders complained about the Venus symbols on the pads.

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"To ensure that anyone who needs to use a period product feels comfortable in doing so with Always, we updated our pad wrapper design," P&G said in a statement.

The company will remove the signs from all packages and pad wrappers as soon as December 2019 in the United Kingdom, with plans for the new package design to be distributed worldwide beginning next year.

Angry feminists called for all women and girls to boycott the company in response to what they say is a concerted effort by corporations to erase women.

P&G was unbothered by the calls for a boycott.

"For over 35 years, Always has championed girls and women, and we will continue to do so,” a Procter & Gamble official said in response to the public backlash.

"We're also committed to diversity and inclusion, and after hearing from many people across genders and age groups, we realized that not everyone who has a period and needs to use a pad identifies as female.
 

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Singer The Weeknd has severed his business ties with H&M after the European clothing giant ran an advertisement on its UK website featuring a black boy wearing a hoodie with the words "Coolest Monkey in the Jungle".

On Monday afternoon Weeknd tweeted: "woke up this morning shocked and embarrassed by this photo. i’m deeply offended and will not be working with @hm anymore..."

H&M, which is based in Sweden, apologized and removed the advertisement on Sunday. But that was not enough for Weeknd and others who remain highly offended by the racist advertising gimmick.

"This image has now been removed from all H&M channels and we apologise to anyone this may have offended," the company told the NY Daily News.

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