Jose Mangual

13-year-old Jovan “JoJo” Mangual’s name has been added to the list of known victims who were crushed under tons of mud, trees and rocks in Oso, Washington’s mudslide on March 22.

JoJo’s body was found in the mudslide and officially identified on Thursday.

JoJo’s father, Army Staff Sgt. Jose Mangual, showed up at the site every day, wading through the debris looking for his son.

“I want to be there, I want to find my son. I wouldn’t do it any other way,” he said in an interview with CNN Monday.

Mangual searched through mud that was 70 feet deep in some places. “Of the five deployments I’ve been on, nothing compares to this,” he said.

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Jose Mangual

Staff Sergeant Jose Mangual searches tirelessly for his son, JoJo, whose body is somewhere under the mud and debris at the site of Washington’s deadly landslide. 29 people have been confirmed dead and 20 people are still missing — including 13-year-old JoJo.

Jo Jo was at home with his stepfather, Bill Spillers, and his 3 siblings when the landslide hit on March 22.

His mother was out shopping and survived.

The body of JoJo’s 5-year-old stepsister, Kaylee, was recovered. His two-year-old stepsister, Brooke, and his stepdad are still missing.

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Mysterious object washed up on beach

A mysterious object that washed up on a beach in the Maldives Islands could be a fire extinguisher bottle from the missing Malaysia Airlines plane.

The object, which police described as a naval sea mine, washed up on the beach near Baarah on Monday, Islanders tell Haveeruh.com.

But some are speculating that the object is a Halon extinguisher bottle like the type used in aircraft cargo holds to extinguish fires.

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Objects spotted on satellite images

The missing Malaysia Airlines plane reportedly flew on for four hours after it lost contact with radar and vanished early Saturday morning.

Flight MH370 carrying 227 passengers and 12 crew members has now been missing for 6 days. 12 countries are involved in the massive search efforts.

A Wall Street Journal aviation reporter, quoting a source at Rolls Royce (the maker of the plane’s engines), says flight MH370’s engines continued to send data long after the transponder turned off.

But Malaysia officials — who have been less than forthcoming — denied the Wall Street Journal report.

Malaysia aviation experts also dismissed satellite images released by China yesterday, saying there was no debris found floating at that location in the waters south of Vietnam.

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flight MH370 flew hundreds of miles off course

Malaysian military officials say the missing Malaysia Airlines plane made a U-turn about 40 minutes after taking off from Kuala Lumpur early Saturday morning. Flight MH370 suddenly vanished from civilian radar at 35,000 feet and descended about 600 feet. Military radar shows the plane flying in a westerly direction hundreds of miles off course, and at a low altitude for about an hour before the military radar lost track of it.

This is an interesting development because it means someone in the cockpit turned the transponder off. The transponder sends transmissions about the plane’s location to air traffic control radar.

Ships and planes from 10 countries are participating in the search for the plane. Officials are ruling out terrorism. Flight MH370 was carrying 227 passengers and 12 crew members when it disappeared.

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