Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images

As Mike Bloomberg stepped up to the pulpit to speak at the historic Brown Chapel in Selma, Alabama, on Sunday, a handful of congregants silently stood and turned their backs to him.

Political and civil rights leaders spoke at the church to mark the 55th anniversary of "Bloody Sunday," when civil rights activists were brutally beaten by Alabama State Troopers during a march across Edmund Pettus Bridge.

Failed gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams sat behind Bloomberg as he spoke. She didn't bat an eyelash during the silent protest.

Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Before the service, Abrams, 46, shook hands with Bloomberg, who donated $5 million to her nonprofit voter suppression organization Fair Fight in Atlanta.

Pastor Leodis Strong applauded the former New York City mayor for even showing his face at the church in Selma.

"It shows a willingness on his part to change," said Strong.

The silent protest was in part due to Bloomberg's support of NY's controversial stop-and-frisk policy.

Critics say Bloomberg weaponized the policy to reflect his deeply held racist beliefs.

Bloomberg, 77, apologized in November for assigning more cops to minority areas "because that's where all the crime is."

Bloomberg apologized in January for ordering police to throw young Black males "up against the wall and frisk them."

And he apologized in February for saying Black and Hispanic males don't follow instructions at work.

One of the people who turned their backs to Bloomberg was Ryan Haygood, president and chief executive of the New Jersey Institute for Social Justice.

As he stood with his back turned, Haygood thought about the police brutality civil rights organizers faced in the church 55 years ago as they protested for equal voting rights.

"I thought this could be the place where he could finally say, once and for all, 'Let me own what I did, let me atone for it.' He didn't even touch it which is more disrespectful," Haygood said.

Joe Biden, fresh off his decisive win at the South Carolina primary on Saturday, also spoke at the annual "Bloody Sunday" service.

78-year-old Biden, who has his own racist past to contend with, playfully suggested that Abrams might be vice president someday.

Abrams closed the four-hour service with a speech about her ongoing efforts to register every Black person to vote for Democrats through her Fair Fight 2020 campaign.

Thanks to fat checks from donors like Bloomberg, her Fair Fight campaign has amassed $25 million in the bank.

Photo by Joshua Lott / AFP

After the service, Democratic presidential candidates, Bloomberg (left), former South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg (center left), Amy Klobuchar (right), Senator Elizabeth Warren (center) and Rev. Jesse Jackson (behind Warren) marched during the annual Bloody Sunday March across the Edmund Pettus Bridge to mark the violent clash with Alabama State Troopers in 1965.

Buttigieg, 38, who dropped out of the presidential race on Sunday, promised to help make sure a Democrat wins the White House in November.

Photos: Getty Images

About 300 women leaders and health professionals gathered in Atlanta last weekend to address the staggering numbers of Black women with HIV.

Black women leaders and medical professionals attended the Paradigm Shift 2.0: Black Women Confronting HIV, Health, and Social Justice Summit, organized by the Sankofa Collaborative at the Loudermilk Conference Center in Atlanta, Georgia.

The Sankofa Collaborative lists biological Black men among the numbers of Black women with HIV, which skews the true numbers of biological Black women living with HIV.

The Sankofa Collaborative "exists to urgently address the devastating impact of HIV/AIDS on Black cis and trans women and their families," said Jammie Hopkins, Ph.D., M.S., a Sankofa planning committee member.

"For too long, structural barriers, social stigma and discrimination, inequitable allocation of funding, and poorly conceived research priorities have perpetuated preventable disparities in HIV/AIDS and other crucial health conditions among Black women," Hopkins added.

In 2017, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta released astonishing data showing over 7,000 HIV diagnoses among Black women and HIV. But the statistics include biological men suffering from gender dysphoria.

Failed Georgia gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams (pictured right) spoke to summit attendees, asking them to pay more attention to voter suppression and its link to lack of health care access in Black communities.

When asked, "As we move forward, how do we exchange talk into sustainable action?" Abrams responded, "Vote!"

National civil rights leader, professor, author, and prison activist Angela Y. Davis (pictured left) also attended the summit in Atlanta.

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Screen grab: YouTube.com

Democrat Stacey Abrams said on "The View" on Monday that she is ready to run for vice president and she hopes to be president of the United States one day.

When asked if she would run for vice president on a Democratic nominee's ticket, she answered, "of course I would be honored to run for vice president with the nominee."

She added it's a "bit disconcerting" to discuss running for vice president because no one in the Democratic field, not even Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar, has asked her to team up with them.

"It seems really obnoxious for me to say that out loud since no one has asked me," Abrams said.

"The issue is, as a woman of color, especially as a Black woman, this is an unusual position to be in.... It would be doing a disservice to every woman of color, every woman of ambition, every child who wants to think beyond their known space for me to say 'No,' or to pretend, 'Oh no, I don't want it.' Of course I want it, Of course I want to serve America. Of course I want to be a patriot and do this work, and so I say, 'Yes.'"

Abrams lost the 2018 Georgia gubernatorial race to Republican Brian Kemp, and then famously refused to concede the race she lost, questioning the legitimacy of the election results.

She has never held a public office higher than a seat in the Georgia House of Representatives.

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