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Stacey Abrams dropped the official trailer for her upcoming voter suppression documentary from Amazon Studios titled "All In: The Fight for Democracy."

Abrams maintains she was robbed during her failed gubernatorial attempt in Georgia in 2018. She refuses to concede defeat to Gov. Brian Kemp.

The 102-minute film documents the various voter suppression restrictions and techniques they claim the GOP have up their sleeves.

The Democrats claim the Republicans have voter suppression measures in place to disrupt the 2020 election, including a "war" on the U.S. Postal Service.

From a press release:

Hi there and Happy Monday!!!

We are so excited to share the official trailer for the upcoming Stacey Abrams voter suppression documentary from Amazon Studios titled ALL IN: The Fight for Democracy.

At a time where voter suppression efforts are at an all-time high in this country (especially with the current war on USPS), this documentary couldn't be more timely.

 

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YouTube, Getty Images

Georgia Governor Brian Kemp banned face mask ordinances in the state, saying face masks can't be enforced in any city or county in the state.

Kemp, a Republican, signed a new executive order on Wednesday night extending his previous EO after the state experienced a sharp rise in coronavirus cases.

The new order keeps in place restrictions on public gatherings of 50 or more people.

The new order extends social distancing and shelter in place guidelines for nursing home patients and medically fragile.

But Kemp prohibited face mask mandates, saying face mask laws are "too restrictive" and violate the individual rights of healthy people who choose not to wear one.

While lawmakers such as Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms in Atlanta have mandated face masks in their cities and counties, Gov. Kemp said the mask ordinances can not be enforced, meaning citizens who don't wear face masks will not be cited or fined.

Mayor Bottoms announced she contracted the virus - despite wearing face masks for months.

Studies have shown face masks increase the risk of contracting the coronavirus because people repeatedly touch their faces.

Failed gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams slammed Kemp as "incompetent", while the mayor of Savannah lashed out at Kemp, saying "He does not give a damn about us."

"Every man and woman for himself/herself," said Savannah Mayor Van Jonson, a Democrat. "Ignore the science and survive the best you can. In #Savannah, we will continue to keep the faith and follow the science. Masks will continue to be available!”

There were nearly 4,000 "confirmed cases" of coronavirus in Georgia and almost 2,800 people are hospitalized due to COVID-19.

But some residents on Twitter complained that their loved ones are being tested "multiple times" - with each positive test counted as a new case.
 

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Russell Simmons claims a reliable inside source told him Joe Biden has already picked Stacey Abrams as his running mate.

Biden's camp announced a selection committee that will vet all of his choices for VP and that an announcement would be made in July.

But Simmons told his 1.6 million Instagram followers that a "very reliable top inside source" told him Biden chose Abrams as his VP.

"America's next VP From a very reliable top inside source... Great news," Simmons, 62, wrote in the caption of a photo of Abrams.

The failed Georgia gubernatorial candidate has made several public appearances as she shamelessly advocated to become Biden's vice president.

Abrams was a potential top pick along with Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms, Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, and failed presidential candidate Hillary Clinton.

Abrams, 46, will launch the New Hampshire Democratic Party's virtual state convention on Saturday.

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Joe Biden's team suggests that his choice for vice president won't be a Black woman. According to Politico.com, Biden's presidential campaign announced their VP selection committee on Thursday. The four-member committee is majority Caucasian.

The committee which is tasked with vetting Biden's VP choice includes Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, Biden's longtime friend and Connecticut Senator Chris Dodd, and former White House Senate counsel Cynthia Hogan.

The only Black person on the committee is Delaware congresswoman Lisa Blount Rochester. Biden says he hopes the vetting process will be completed by July.

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Rumors are running rampant that Biden has already made his choice: Hillary Clinton who enthusiastically endorsed him earlier this week.

Stacey Abrams, who initially stated she did not want the VP job, changed her mind after she heard Biden's announcement that he would choose a woman.

The failed gubernatorial candidate has been campaigning ever since for the VP pick -- even though political strategists frown upon any candidate campaigning for vice president.

South Carolina Rep. Jim Clyburn, who has advocated for Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms as VP, seems to have his doubts.

When asked by MSN if having a Black woman on the ticket is a must, Clyburn said. "I'm among those who feel that it would be great for him to select a woman of color. But that is not a must."

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Stacey Abrams escalated her pressure on Joe Biden after rumors swirled that he will pick failed presidential candidate Hillary Clinton as his running mate in July.

After losing the 2016 election to Donald Trump, Clinton has positioned herself to be president of the United States after all.

On Tuesday, Clinton enthusiastically endorsed Biden, whom many say has senile dementia.

According to Politico.com, Abrams "has been privately calling Democratic power brokers, asking them to tell Biden campaign officials that she should be vice president..."

In numerous interviews, Abrams, who unsuccessfully campaigned for Georgia governor, has said she "would be an excellent running mate" for Biden.

Unlike other candidates, Abrams, 46, has loudly campaigned for the VP job.

Some political insiders say Abrams' behavior appears "desperate." They say her actions are an unprecedented and shameless attempt to shoehorn her way into the White House.

According to Politico, "overt campaigning for the vice presidency has traditionally been frowned upon".

Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer, another candidate for VP, said "You don't run for that. That is a selection of the top of the ticket, and everyone else should be just busy doing their jobs."

Democratic strategists say Abrams lacks foreign policy experience, but Abrams has cited her "independent study" of international affairs as a qualification for the role of VP.

Her only political experience includes being minority leader of the Georgia House of Representatives.

Abrams stubbornly refuses to concede the governor's race to Gov. Brian Kemp after losing the race by 55,000 votes in 2018.

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Stacey Abrams says America "can't survive another four years with Donald Trump" in the White House.

The failed gubernatorial candidate disparaged President Trump during an appearance on CNN's "State of the Union" on Sunday.

"Vice President [Joe] Biden has done this job," Abrams said. "He knows what he needs to do to win and what he needs to do to help our country recover from four years of incompetence and chaos."

Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images

Abrams went on to say she believes Biden will make the right choice in picking a woman of color -- specifically her.

She said Biden choosing a woman of color for VP would promote "trust" with the Black community. "Women of color are the strongest part of the Democratic Party."

But Black people are wary of Biden's racist past and reports that he suffers from senile dementia.

"I want to make one thing very clear," said Abrams, "Joe Biden enjoys the trust of communities of color, and he will take no one for granted. I believe he will make the right choice based on what he understands and what his team recommends that he do."

She added, "Vice President Biden understands how critical this election is. With four decades of experience, he also knows the tricks Republicans will use to block change. We can't survive another four years with Donald Trump, and that's why my organization, Fair Fight 2020, is working nationally in 18 states to ensure that we have a president who actually believes in and trusts the American people."

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According to OAN News, Rev. Al Sharpton is expected to endorse Abrams for VP later this week.

Sharpton believes Biden needs help "connecting" with Black voters. He cites Abrams' ability to drive voter turnout as her greatest strength.

"I've said openly that there are Black women that can be on that ticket..." said Sharpton. "I'm excited about Stacey Abrams, who I think brings a lot to this country."

The hashtag #DropOutBiden trended on Twitter over the weekend, driven by the #MeToo movement and progressives who believe Biden's accuser Tara Reade was sexually assaulted by Biden in 1993.

CNN quietly deleted a 1993 episode of Larry King Live from Google's play store that featured Reade's mother calling in to the show to say her daughter had "problems" working for a "prominent senator".

The woman said her daughter did not want her to go to the press out of respect for the unnamed senator.

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Joe Biden will begin vetting his choices for vice president when he forms a selection panel on Friday, May 1.

Biden backed himself into a corner when he vowed he would pick a female as his running mate. He has been under intense pressure to pick a woman of color.

Biden's short list of female candidates includes Stacey Abrams, Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms, California Senator Kamala Harris and Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer.

Abrams is eager to be the country's first Black and female vice president. The failed gubernatorial candidate gave Biden an ultimatum: either pick me, or lose the Black vote.

"I would be an excellent running mate," Abrams insisted in an interview with Elle magazine last week. "I am prepared and excited to serve."

On Wednesday, Abrams went from suggesting herself as vice president to making threats if Biden doesn't choose her.

During an appearance on ABC's "The View," Abrams said she was "concerned" that Biden might not pick a Black woman.

"Women of color, particularly Black women, are the strongest part of the Democratic Party. The most loyal. But that loyalty isn't simply how we vote, it's how we work," she said.

Abrams added that the 77-year-old Biden risks losing the Black vote if he doesn't pick a Black woman.

Abrams, 46, is certainly the liberal news media's choice for VP by far.

"Everybody knows you're extremely qualified," Gayle King told Abrams on Tuesday.

Abrams was unable to convince Georgians to elect her as their governor in 2018. She still refuses to concede the race to Gov. Brian Kemp.

Are Americans ready for a Black female president if Biden, who reportedly has dementia, suddenly dies or becomes incapable of performing his duties as president?
 

FYI: An earlier version of this post said Biden will announce his VP pick on May 1. In fact, he is expected to form a selection panel to vet his VP choices on May 1.

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Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms (right) defied Governor Brian Kemp by urging residents to stay home when the state is reopened on Friday, April 24.

The Republican Governor announced on Monday that the state would reopen for business after a month on lockdown to prevent the spread of the flu-like coronavirus.

The governor's order will allow gyms, bowling alleys, hair salons and some other indoor facilities to resume operations by Friday if they comply with social distancing requirements.

Mayor Bottoms, who was caught off guard by Kemp's announcement, told MSNBC's "MTP Daily" on Tuesday that she is aware that her powers don't supersede Kemp's as governor.

"But I do have the power of my voice," the Democratic mayor said. "And I am using my voice to encourage people: Follow the data, look at the science, listen to the health care professionals and use your common sense."

"Please stay home," Mayor Bottoms said. Her hair was laid and her makeup was flawless as she urged women to neglect their own hair and nails for the health and safety of others.

"Simply because we have hospital beds available, doesn't mean that we should work to fill them up," she said.

Failed gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams said Kemp's decision to reopen the state didn't make sense in an interview with MSNBC's Morning Joe.

"These jobs that are reopening, these businesses that are reopening, are going to force frontline workers back to work without having been tested, without having access to a healthcare system to help them if they are in need," Abrams said.

Democratic governors and mayors have been resistant to reopen their states. But some caved to pressure after angry residents took to the streets to protest the forced home detainment.

Protesters blocked traffic near state capitol buildings in Michigan, Tennessee and South Carolina.

Texas has already reopened, and Georgia plans to reopen on Friday - with or without Mayor Bottoms' blessings.

Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images

As Mike Bloomberg stepped up to the pulpit to speak at the historic Brown Chapel in Selma, Alabama, on Sunday, a handful of congregants silently stood and turned their backs to him.

Political and civil rights leaders spoke at the church to mark the 55th anniversary of "Bloody Sunday," when civil rights activists were brutally beaten by Alabama State Troopers during a march across Edmund Pettus Bridge.

Failed gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams sat behind Bloomberg as he spoke. She didn't bat an eyelash during the silent protest.

Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Before the service, Abrams, 46, shook hands with Bloomberg, who donated $5 million to her nonprofit voter suppression organization Fair Fight in Atlanta.

Pastor Leodis Strong applauded the former New York City mayor for even showing his face at the church in Selma.

"It shows a willingness on his part to change," said Strong.

The silent protest was in part due to Bloomberg's support of NY's controversial stop-and-frisk policy.

Critics say Bloomberg weaponized the policy to reflect his deeply held racist beliefs.

Bloomberg, 77, apologized in November for assigning more cops to minority areas "because that's where all the crime is."

Bloomberg apologized in January for ordering police to throw young Black males "up against the wall and frisk them."

And he apologized in February for saying Black and Hispanic males don't follow instructions at work.

One of the people who turned their backs to Bloomberg was Ryan Haygood, president and chief executive of the New Jersey Institute for Social Justice.

As he stood with his back turned, Haygood thought about the police brutality civil rights organizers faced in the church 55 years ago as they protested for equal voting rights.

"I thought this could be the place where he could finally say, once and for all, 'Let me own what I did, let me atone for it.' He didn't even touch it which is more disrespectful," Haygood said.

Joe Biden, fresh off his decisive win at the South Carolina primary on Saturday, also spoke at the annual "Bloody Sunday" service.

78-year-old Biden, who has his own racist past to contend with, playfully suggested that Abrams might be vice president someday.

Abrams closed the four-hour service with a speech about her ongoing efforts to register every Black person to vote for Democrats through her Fair Fight 2020 campaign.

Thanks to fat checks from donors like Bloomberg, her Fair Fight campaign has amassed $25 million in the bank.

Photo by Joshua Lott / AFP

After the service, Democratic presidential candidates, Bloomberg (left), former South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg (center left), Amy Klobuchar (right), Senator Elizabeth Warren (center) and Rev. Jesse Jackson (behind Warren) marched during the annual Bloody Sunday March across the Edmund Pettus Bridge to mark the violent clash with Alabama State Troopers in 1965.

Buttigieg, 38, who dropped out of the presidential race on Sunday, promised to help make sure a Democrat wins the White House in November.

Photos: Getty Images

About 300 women leaders and health professionals gathered in Atlanta last weekend to address the staggering numbers of Black women with HIV.

Black women leaders and medical professionals attended the Paradigm Shift 2.0: Black Women Confronting HIV, Health, and Social Justice Summit, organized by the Sankofa Collaborative at the Loudermilk Conference Center in Atlanta, Georgia.

The Sankofa Collaborative lists biological Black men among the numbers of Black women with HIV, which skews the true numbers of biological Black women living with HIV.

The Sankofa Collaborative "exists to urgently address the devastating impact of HIV/AIDS on Black cis and trans women and their families," said Jammie Hopkins, Ph.D., M.S., a Sankofa planning committee member.

"For too long, structural barriers, social stigma and discrimination, inequitable allocation of funding, and poorly conceived research priorities have perpetuated preventable disparities in HIV/AIDS and other crucial health conditions among Black women," Hopkins added.

In 2017, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta released astonishing data showing over 7,000 HIV diagnoses among Black women and HIV. But the statistics include biological men suffering from gender dysphoria.

Failed Georgia gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams (pictured right) spoke to summit attendees, asking them to pay more attention to voter suppression and its link to lack of health care access in Black communities.

When asked, "As we move forward, how do we exchange talk into sustainable action?" Abrams responded, "Vote!"

National civil rights leader, professor, author, and prison activist Angela Y. Davis (pictured left) also attended the summit in Atlanta.

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Democrat Stacey Abrams said on "The View" on Monday that she is ready to run for vice president and she hopes to be president of the United States one day.

When asked if she would run for vice president on a Democratic nominee's ticket, she answered, "of course I would be honored to run for vice president with the nominee."

She added it's a "bit disconcerting" to discuss running for vice president because no one in the Democratic field, not even Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar, has asked her to team up with them.

"It seems really obnoxious for me to say that out loud since no one has asked me," Abrams said.

"The issue is, as a woman of color, especially as a Black woman, this is an unusual position to be in.... It would be doing a disservice to every woman of color, every woman of ambition, every child who wants to think beyond their known space for me to say 'No,' or to pretend, 'Oh no, I don't want it.' Of course I want it, Of course I want to serve America. Of course I want to be a patriot and do this work, and so I say, 'Yes.'"

Abrams lost the 2018 Georgia gubernatorial race to Republican Brian Kemp, and then famously refused to concede the race she lost, questioning the legitimacy of the election results.

She has never held a public office higher than a seat in the Georgia House of Representatives.

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