Photo by Brian To/WENN.com

Byron Allen is furious over a U.S. Supreme Court decision in his discrimination lawsuit against cable TV giant Comcast.

The billionaire TV mogul criticized the U.S. Supreme Court decision on Monday that dismissed a lower court's ruling that had allowed him to move forward with his case.

Allen accused Comcast of discriminating against him because he is Black, saying Comcast discriminates against minority-owned programming.

Allen argued that Comcast refused to license his TV channels Cats.tv and Pets.tv because he is Black.

But the Supreme Court ruled on Monday that Allen failed to prove Comcast would have licensed his channels if he was not Black.

Photo: WENN/Avalon

"This is a vey bad day for our country," Allen told Yahoo Finance in a statement on Monday.

"Unfortunately, the Supreme Court has rendered a ruling that is harmful to the civil rights of millions of Americans."

Allen added: "We will continue our fight by going to Congress and the presidential candidates to revise the statute to overcome this decision by the United States Supreme Court, which significantly diminishes our civil rights."

In a separate statement, Comcast said it was pleased with the Supreme Court's decision.

"We are proud of our record on diversity and will not rest on this record. We will continue to look for ways to add even more innovative and diverse programming that appeals to our diverse viewership and continue our diversity and inclusion efforts across the company."

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The week is off to a good start for President Donald Trump who suffered political and personal setbacks last week. The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday blocked a NY Lower court order for Trump to release his tax returns to House Democrats in Congress.

Chief Justice John Roberts delayed the release of the tax returns while the Supreme Court considers Trump's appeal. The temporary stay will block the release of Trump's tax returns indefinitely.

The Supreme Court is also considering a separate pending request from Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance, who wants to review Trump’s tax returns over allegations that business records were falsified as part of a hush money payment to porn star Stormy Daniels.

A lower court in New York had ordered Trump's longtime accounting firm to turn over the president's financial records to the House Democrats who are in the process of impeaching the president.

Democrats have until Thursday, Nov. 21, to file a response to Chief Justice Roberts' order.

Trump suffered a political defeat after his candidate for governor of Louisiana lost to sitting Governor John Bel Edwards in a state that Trump carried by nearly 20 percentage points in 2016.

Trump had visited the state three times to stump for his candidate, including 48 hours before the gubernatorial election.

Twitter users taunted Trump for tweeting - and deleting - "Louisiana, 3 hours left, get out and vote for @EddieRispone for Governor. Lower taxes and much more!"

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In another setback last week, Trump's friend and former advisor Roger Stone was found guilty on seven charges of lying to Congress, obstruction of Congress, and witness tampering. Stone faces a maximum of 50 years in a federal prison.

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Virginia Dept. of Corrections

Many believe D.C. sniper Lee Boyd Malvo is a psychopath who deserves to spend the rest of his life in prison. But the Supreme Court may consider reducing his sentence or releasing him.

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Malvo and his mentor John Allen Muhammad terrorized Washington, D.C. during the so-called "D.C. Sniper" shooting spree in 2002. 10 people were killed and three others injured during the sniper attacks.

The two men were arrested while they slept in a car at a highway rest stop in Maryland. Muhammad (pictured below) was executed on death row, per his request.

DAVIS TURNER/AFP Pool via Getty Images

Malvo, who was 17 at the time of the shootings, was sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole.

Supporters say Malvo was an immature boy who was easily manipulated by the older man. Now 34, Malvo is a model inmate at a maximum security prison in Virginia.

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A talented artist, Malvo spends his days reading the Quran and drawing in his prison cell. The doodle below was entered into evidence December 3, 2003 during his trial at the Chesapeake Circuit Court in Chesapeake, Virginia.

Fairfax Circuit Court via Getty Images

The United States Supreme Court will consider Malvo's request to re-sentence or release him in the aftermath of a 2012 court decision that prohibits mandatory life sentences for juveniles, ABC News reported.

Malvo's attorney's wrote in court documents:

"Invalidation of 'mandatory' life without-parole sentences is premised on the court's recognition that the qualities of youth - immaturity, vulnerability and changeability - must be taken into account when sentencing a juvenile offender because those qualities will typically make life without parole an excessive punishment for a juvenile."

Malvo's lawyers say the jury were only instructed to consider a punishment of life without parole or the death penalty in his murder trial.

Malvo's case has precedence. Just recently, convicted murderer Cyntoia Brown, who killed a man in his sleep when she was 16, was released from prison where she was serving a life sentence.

Brown, now 31, apologized to the victim's family this week - but only to promote her new memoir, critics say.

The U.S. Supreme Court sided with Colorado baker Jack Phillips, saying he is free to express his artistic creativity in a manner that does not violate his religious beliefs.

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Supreme Court

On Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court dealt a major blow to transgender rights advocates.

The Supreme Court ruled that it will not hear a case brought by gender confused Virginia high school student Gavin Grimm, pictured above with her mother.

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Gavin Grimm

The U.S. Supreme Court granted an emergency order on Wednesday blocking a mentally ill girl from using the boys' restroom at a Virginia high school.

The 17-year-old girl named "Gavin Grimm" is at the center of a national controversy over transgender bathroom rights.

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President Obama Hillary Clinton

The Supreme Court dealt President Obama a major blow today on immigration reform. The high court blocked Obama's executive order on anti-deportation.

The decision was split 4-4, affirming the ruling of the lower court that said Obama was overstepping his bounds by bypassing the legislative branch.

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President Obama

Influential blacks were calling for President Barack Obama to appoint a black woman to the Supreme Court seat vacated by Justice Antonin Scalia.

Obama was expected to appoint California AG Kamala Harris, who is half black on her daddy's side.

But once again, Obama disappointed his supporters.

See who he chose after the break.

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Judge Cinderela Guevara

Infowars reporter David Knight confronted the Democratic Texas judge who "certified" Justice Antonin Scalia's death over the phone without ever observing his body.

Judge Cinderela Guevara turned her back on Knight who asked her pointed questions about whether proper procedures were followed after Scalia's untimely death on Monday.

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Antonin Scalia

The mystery surrounding Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia's death deepens with the news that he was found with a pillow over his face.

According to published news reports Scalia, who was a robust 79, died of a heart attack in the "el presidente" suite at a Texas hunting ranch.

A pillow was found over his face and the bed sheets were unwrinkled, according to the reports.

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