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Instagram/@chrissyteigen

Chrissy Teigen delivered a stillborn baby boy, after the model suffered a miscarriage and her baby died in utero.

Teigen was hospitalized over the weekend due to heavy bleeding. The 34-year-old model and social media influencer announced the devastating news as she shared a B&W photo of herself sitting on her hospital bed crying.

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Instagram/@chrissyteigen

"We are shocked and in the kind of deep pain you only hear about, the kind of pain we've never felt before," she wrote in the caption. "We were never able to stop the bleeding and give our baby the fluids he needed, despite bags and bags of blood transfusions. It just wasn't enough."

Vasquez-Max Lopes / BACKGRID

Teigen added that while she and husband John Legend, who are also parents to 4-year-old Luna and two-year-old Miles, don't usually choose their children's names until "just before we leave the hospital", they had called their unborn son Jack.

"Jack worked so hard to be a part of our little family, and he will be, forever," she wrote, before sharing a personal message to Jack.

"To our Jack - I'm so sorry that the first few moments of your life were met with so many complications, that we couldn't give you the home you needed to survive. We will always love you," she wrote.

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Instagram/@chrissyteigen

Teigen also shared a B&W photo of a doctor administering an epidural injection in preparation to induce labor. In another touching photo, she and Legend are seen mourning their stillborn son.
 

Teigen was rushed to the hospital after experiencing excessive uterine bleeding on Sunday. She received a double blood transfusion due to heavy blood loss.

Vasquez-Max Lopes / BACKGRID

Teigen, who was in her second trimester of pregnancy, tweeted that she had a "really scary" experience. She said she passed a "huge clot" and "the scramble to hear the [baby's] heartbeat seemed like hours."

Later, Teigen tweeted the fetus was okay. "Basically he's the strongest, coolest dude in the s-------t house. His house is just falling apart," she said of her unborn baby. "It didn't have a good foundation to begin with, though. He didn't have the strongest chance at the very, very beginning."

Teigen had been on mandatory bedrest for weeks after periodic spotting and bleeding. Doctors usually prescribe the female hormone Progesterone to women with a history of bleeding to prevent a miscarriage.

But Progesterone can be both a blessing and a curse to pregnant women, as the hormone can cause excessive uterine bleeding that leads to a spontaneous abortion.

Thanking her fans for their "positive energy, thoughts and prayers", Teigen wrote:

"We are so grateful for the life we have, for our wonderful babies Luna and Miles, for all the amazing things we've been able to experience. But every day can't be full of sunshine. On this darkest of days, we will grieve, we will cry our eyes out. But we will hug and love each other harder and get through it."

Teigen later tweeted: "Driving home from the hospital with no baby. How can this be real."
 

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Toni Braxton broke Instagram when she posted a photo of her hysterectomy scars over the weekend. The mother-of-2 is seen in her bathroom mirror, wearing a skimpy jersey and black panties. The 51-year-old pop singer captioned the image:

"Embracing my WHOLE body...hysterectomy scars and all...@orangetheory making me feel 29 again! [eye] love me some me!"

What is a hysterectomy?

A hysterectomy is the surgical removal of the uterus, aka the womb, for medical or cosmetic reasons. The uterus is part of the biological woman's reproductive system. It is where a baby grows when a female is pregnant.

Why is a hysterectomy performed?

A hysterectomy is performed for medical reasons when a woman's quality of life is affected by cancer or painful medical disorders such as endometriosis and uterine fibroids.

Painful medical conditions that may result in a hysterectomy include:

  • Chronic vaginal bleeding
  • Uterine cancer
  • Cancer of the cervix
  • Cancer of the ovaries
  • Fibroids
  • Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)
  • Uterine prolapse (when uterus drops into vagina)
  • Endometriosis (painful condition when lining grows outside uterus)
  • Adenomyosis (uterus lining grows into the uterus muscles)
  • What are the types of hysterectomies?

    1. Partial hysterectomy
    When the surgeon removes a part of the uterus but leaves the cervix intact.

    2. Total hysterectomy
    The surgeon removes all of the uterus, including the cervix. Women who have undergone total hysterectomies no longer need Pap smears since the cervix is gone.

    3. Hysterectomy and Salpingo-Oophorectomy
    The surgeon removes the entire uterus, including the cervix and one or both of the ovaries and Fallopian tubes.

    How is a hysterectomy performed?

    Surgeons can remove the uterus in a variety of ways.

    Laparoscopic Hysterectomy - the surgeon inserts a long tube into small incisions below the bikini line. A tool at the end of the tube cuts up the uterus into small pieces and the pieces are suctioned through the tube. Recovery time is about 1-2 weeks. This appears to be the surgery Braxton had done based on the small scars.

    Abdominal Hysterectomy - the surgeon removes the uterus through a large gaping incision in the abdomen above or below the bikini line. This was once considered major surgery. Down time is longer than a laparoscopic hysterectomy, and the pain is more intense.

    Vaginal Hysterectomy - when your uterus is removed through an incision in your vagina. Most women decline this option.

    What are the risks of hysterectomy?

    Risks are rare, but every surgery carries risks from blood clots to serious infections. Follow-up with your doctor is important, as are following post-op instructions and taking all medications on time.

    This has been your Medical Minute.

    More Info On the Web

    Hysterectomy: Purpose, Procedure, and Risks | Healthline.com

    Hysterectomy | Womenshealth.gov

    Hysterectomy, Endometriosis, Fibroids | MedlinePlus
     

    DISCLAIMER

    Any medical information published on this blog is for your general information only and is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice. You should not take any action before consulting with your personal physician or a health care provider. Sandrarose.com and its affiliates cannot be held liable for any damages incurred by following information found on this blog.