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Fire officials in Massachusetts are warning TikTok users not to participate in a dangerous viral challenge that causes fires when pennies are placed on iPhone chargers.

The viral trend is responsible for setting classrooms on fire at two Massachusetts schools this week.

The Plymouth fire department issued letters to Plymouth North High School students and parents warning them to stop putting pennies on the exposed prongs of iPhone chargers.

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Photos: Plymouth Fire Department

Firefighters say the exposed prongs coming in contact with a copper penny causes an arc of electricity from electrical outlets.

According to a teacher, two students plugged iPhone chargers into outlets and placed a penny between the partially exposed prongs of the charger and the outlet, resulting in sparks and flames.

"It's almost like an explosion," said Plymouth Fire Chief Edward Bradley. "The electricity propels the charger and the coin - the coin is molten metal at this point," Bradley told WHDH TV.

"It does not take much to be electrocuted fatally just by an outlet in a wall socket," he explained.

Amherst Fire Department Assistant Chief Jeff Olmstead said the viral challenge could cause thousands of dollars in damage to the electrical system "if they have to pull those wires back to a circuit breaker. The damage to the person, electrocution causing burns or death or starting clothes on fire or items nearby," he told Western Mass News.

Olmstead said pranksters will be charged with felony arson and property damage.

"Although they are younger, they will face fees, fines and probation and no one wants to see them have a felony or conviction on a record."

Photo by Prince Williams/ATLpics.net

Yung Joc was clowned over the weekend when he was caught on video driving for a ride-share service. Joc went viral when Uber customers recorded him picking them up.

"You sound like somebody I know," one of the passengers said. Joc explained that he was driving for "a month or so" because "it was an easy way to get some easy money right here downtown."

Many assumed this was yet another stunt by Joc to go "viral." He doesn't need the few hundred dollars.

The 36-year-old business owner is a cast member on Love & Hip-Hop, as well as a co-host on a popular radio station here in Atlanta. All of which provides him with a tidy income to support his many children.

Behind the scenes, Joc caught flack for pulling more stunts in order to "go viral" on social media.

He isn't the only one. Many washed up celebrities hire PR firms to come up with stunts that have a high probability of going viral and increasing more "engagement" on social media.

As an industry insider explained to me: "Going viral is this generation's currency."

But according to Joc, his Uber driving gig is no stunt for fleeting viral fame.

Photo by Prince Williams/ATLpics.net

The former rapper told TMZ that he has been part of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Metro Atlanta for years, and he is leading by example.

"You show them what humility is and you're not too big to do the right thing by making an honest living," he said. "I think that's why a lot of kids - and even adults - go astray. Because they're too ashamed, they're too prideful to do something."

He said one of the perks of "going viral" was the support he received from people like OG rapper Snoop Dogg.

"The most phenomenal part of this experience from this going viral is the amount of support," he said. "I just realize that maybe people are beginning to be a little more mature."

Speaking of maturity, it will be interesting to see what stunt Joc comes up with next.
 

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Screenshot: GoFundMe

In 2016, a hungry 15-year-old boy named Chauncy Black approached Matthew Michael White in a Kroger parking lot. Chauncy asked Matt if he could take his groceries to his car in exchange for a box of glazed donuts for dinner.

"Something told me to go there and ask this guy if I can take his groceries to the car," Chauncy told WHBQ.

Matt later said he felt compelled to take the teen on a shopping spree in the grocery store.

When Matt dropped Chauncy off at his home in South Memphis, he was shocked by what he saw. Chauncy, his grandmother, whom he calls "mom", lived in squalid conditions and Chuancy didn't have a bed to sleep on.

Matt wrote about the encounter on his Facebook page and created a GoFundMe account. He described his chance meeting with the teenager as "God's beautiful design."

Within three months, donations to the GoFundMe account topped $342,000.

But Chauncy's story doesn't have a happy ending.

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Chauncy, now 19, and his brother Timothy Black, 20, were arrested and charged with second-degree murder after one man was killed during a shootout in Cordova, Tennessee on Jan. 4.

They were also charged with tampering and fabricating evidence and reckless endangerment, according to Fox 13 Memphis.

According to an arrest affidavit, Chauncy and his brother told police a group of men drove to their house after an argument. One person in the car opened fire at the house.

Timothy and Chauncy ran inside the house, grabbed their firearms and fired back at the vehicle as it drove away at high speed.

26-year-old Kaleb Wakefield was hit by a stray bullet in a house across the street. He was pronounced dead at the scene.

Chauncy and Timothy then hid their guns, which they did not have permits to carry, according to WREG.

Jaylin Edwards, the shooter inside the vehicle and his brother Tyrek Edwards were arrested and charged with aggravated assault, reckless endangerment with a deadly weapon and gun possession.

Chauncy's attorney, Ben Israel tells WREG that Chauncy did get most of the GoFundMe money after taxes were taken out.

"Some of the money was used to buy a home they stay in in Cordova," said Israel. "Some of the money was used to purchase lawn equipment for a lawn service company that Chauncy was running until he was arrested."

Israel is not sure how much of the money is left.

Chauncy's family said he fell in the with the wrong crowd after his story went viral in 2016.
 

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