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Marvel Comics

Marvel Comics is set to unveil a new LGBT+ character as part of a five-part limited edition series titled The United States of Captain America.

The timing is intended to coincide with Pride Month in June, and the character featured in that month's intro story will be a teenage Captain America who is homosexual.

The plot will follow four popular previous Captain Americas (Steve Rogers, Sam Wilson, Bucky Barnes and John Walker) who go on a cross country journey to meet people who have made a difference in their communities.

One of the people they meet is Aaron Fischer, an openly LGBT+ teenager who dubs himself "Captain America of the Railways," and protects runaways and homeless people.

Marvel Comics is a subsidiary of The Walt Disney Company, which is committed to increasing visibility of LGBT+ characters by 40 percent in 2021.

Fischer is depicted as a white male punk rocker with a mohawk haircut and tattoos. Black male teenagers as a consumer group don't read Marvel comics.

Fischer will debut in the main story of issue #1, written and illustrated by Aaron Trujillo and Jan Bazaldua.

"Aaron is inspired by heroes of the queer community: activists, leaders, and everyday folks pushing for a better life," Trujillo said in a Marvel press release. "He stands for the oppressed, and the forgotten. I hope his debut story resonates with readers, and helps inspire the next generation of heroes."

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KIMT 3 News

Twitter imploded this week when Joe Biden announced Dr. Seuss books will not be part of "Read Across America Day."

Parents everywhere expressed outrage at the U.S. president's decision to break tradition and erase Dr. Seuss books from his proclamation on Read Across America Day.

The Read Across America program was launched by the National Educators of America (NEA) in 1998 to promote children's literacy, according to MSNBC.

Amazon removed the six Dr. Seuss books from its online platform, and Dr. Seuss Enterprises told the Associated Press, the decision to cease publication and sales of the 6 books was made last year.

At issue are images that may be offensive to Asian people in the books titled "And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street", "If I Ran the Zoo", "McElligot's Pool," "On Beyond Zebra!," "Scrambled Eggs Super!," and "The Cat's Quizzer."

Social media users who grew up reading Dr. Seuss books took to Twitter to express their outrage.

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Former hip-hop/country rapper Lil Nas X hopes his new core audience -- children -- will make his new career choice a big success.

After the success of his one hit song, "Old Town Road," the Grammy-winning country/hip-hop singer released his first children's book, "C is for Country."

The cover illustration features a little Black boy wearing a pink rhinestone cowboy outfit with matching cowboy hat and boots. The boy holds a guitar in one hand while straddling a pony.

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Penguin Random House

The concept of the new book is "just be yourself." The book takes young readers on a tour of a mythical farm and the things Lil Nas X loves.

"A is for adventure." "B is for boots." "C is for country" are examples Lil Nas X uses to teach minor children their ABCs.

It doesn't take long for the Alphabet to take a detour off the farm.

"F" is for fringe, feathers and fake fur, according to Lil Nas X, who dabbled in his mother's makeup, shoes, and fake furs as a child.

"I love that for me," he says, before adding that the "be yourself" message is missing from children's books.

"It was never truly enforced. It was kind of like 'do what you want, be who you want, but be who I want you to be.'"

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The Atlanta rapper, real name Montero Lamar Hill, came out of the closet in 2019.

Lil Nas X, 21, said his young nieces and nephews, to whom the book is dedicated, helped influence his message in the book.

He clapped back at fans on social media who accused him of being a pedophile after a young male fan unfounded leveled accusations at him.

Lil Nas X doesn't regret leaving his gimmicky rap career behind to help LGBT+ children discover their truth.

"I'm well aware that life and careers and everything goes in chapters," he said. "That's the chapter I'm in right now and I'm OK with that."

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A new study recently published by a college professor finds that the American media portrayal of Black men "perpetuates many of the same, negative patterns that are common in popular culture."

Armon Perry, a professor of social work at the University of Louisville, spent two decades reviewing research on Black men and families.

The research falls into one of two categories: many Black men are "disproportionately low income," and "poor Black men reject monogamous romantic relationships in favor of a hypersexual masculinity to overcompensate for their inability to fulfill the traditional breadwinner role."

Other studies found that Black males desire intimacy and companionship in stable relationships. But the economic disparities they face in every day American society is one of the factors in their struggles to maintain stable monogamous relationships.

In his 4 year study, Perry followed 33 Black men from Louisville, Kentucky. He found that "the near-exclusive focus on low-income Black men in research related to the family skews perceptions of these men."

He found that the skewed perceptions of low income men reinforce negative stereotypes that portray Black males as dangerous and predatory.

Many of the Black men Perry interviewed credited their partners with making them better husbands, fathers and men.

According to one of the participants, "I always tell her that I couldn't have become who I am without her. Meeting the right person... is probably the most important decision I've made in my life."

Perry's findings, which counter the popular image that society holds of Black men, are published in his book: "Black Love Matters: Authentic Men's Voices on Marriage and Romantic Relationships."

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YouTube

Barack Obama's new book broke records for his book publisher Penguin Random House. The news comes as supporters of the former U.S. president celebrate his "third term in office."

Obama's new book, A Promised Land, released on Nov. 17, sold 1.7 million units in all formats and editions in the U.S. and Canada to date.

The first week sales of 887,000 units is a first-day record for the book publishing house.

The first-week sales stand as the largest one-week total for any book ever released by Penguin Random House.

Obama promoted the book with an interview on Power 105.1's Breakfast Club last week. Co-host Charlamagne tha god held Obama's feet to the fire by demanding to know why he didn't do more for Black people in his first 2 terms in office.

Co-host DJ Envy also pressed Obama to explain why he uplifted LGBT+ people over Black people who have suffered for 200 years.

Obama said he was confident that he did more for Black people than current President Donald Trump.

He also blamed Republicans for blocking his attempts to pass laws for Black people. But Democrats held the majority in both the House and the Senate in Obama's first 2 years in office.

Obama was asked to name his specific pro-Black laws that Congress blocked, but he danced around the answer.
 

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YouTube

Filmmaker and author Matthew A. Cherry announced the audiobook adaptation of his Oscar-winning short film Hair Love is available for purchase online.

The audiobook is narrated by Blue Ivy Carter, the 8-year-old daughter of Beyonce and Jay Z.

The six-minute film was originally released in 2018 and follows the story of a Black dad who learns to style his daughter's hair for the first time.

The animated film won an Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film this year.

Blue won her first major award at the 51st NAACP Image Awards. She later took home a BET Award for her collaboration on "Brown Skin Girl" with her mother, Beyonce.

Blu Ivy's 4-minute narration is available on Audible Plus.

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A man-hating lesbian is racking up 5 star reviews for her book, titled Lesbian Genius.

"We have to erase men," said Alice Coffin, a lesbian activist and Paris city councillor. According to DailyMail.com, Alice said she doesn't listen to music, read books, or watch films made by men.

Alice and her partner, a male-identified lesbian named Yuri, belong to a growing sisterhood who see men as a danger to women everywhere.

"We have to erase them. Erase them from our minds, from our pictures, from our representation. I don't read books by men anymore, I don't watch their movies, I don't listen to their music", she writes.

Alice, who is a male-identified lesbian, says she "imagined" herself as a boy when she was younger. But she now believes being a lesbian is a "greater" achievement than being male.

She claims men are waging a "permanent war on women" and her book is a response to the favor men continue to receive in society.

Alice said society erects monuments to men and celebrate their male heroes, while women are objectified and reduced to their feminine parts.

Alice's book received a flood of 5 star reviews on Amazon as readers gush that the author makes points they haven't heard before.

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Victoria Pearson for Sweet July

Stephen Curry's wife, Ayesha, launched her new lifestyle magazine, titled Sweet July.

The premier issue is packed with articles on beauty tips, fashion, recipes, love and relationships, decorating, and profiles on social media influencers.

"I'm so nervous and excited about it," she tells PEOPLE. "This first issue is all about presence and gratitude, which I think is so important, not only in life, but especially right now. I just hope that people find a sense of peace from it."

Ayesha, referred to as "AC" in the magazine, shares photos from "an Epic Ladies Brunch," attended by her mother, Carol, grandmother, Gwendolyn, Stephen's mother, Sonya, and her sister, Maria.

Three generations of Ayesha's family are seen locked in a warm embrace in the "Community" column, and Carol, a mixed-race Jamaican, has her own column where she shares her "wisdom and unique point of view" with Ayesha's readers.

The "Connected" column, accompanied by a photo of AC in bed with her husband, Stephen, features an emotional conversation about love -- whether it's important to say it with words or actions.

And in the "Ask Mom Anything" feature, Ayesha tackles questions from her daughters Riley, 7, Ryan, 4. 1-year-old son, Canon, is featured in adorable photos.

The cover price is $9.99 USD, and the magazine is available via Amazon, Apple News+, Zinio, and the Barnes & Noble Nook.
 

Copyright Disclaimer: I do not own the rights to the photograph(s) used in this post. Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act of 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" of photographs for purposes such as parody, criticism, commentary, news reporting, education, and research.

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Oscar winner Lupita Nyong'o has authored a new children's book loosely based on her own battle with colorism and dark skin.

The 12 Years a Slave actress grew up thinking light-skin was better, and now her book, Sulwe, helps dark skinned children to embrace the skin they are in. The 36-year-old Mexico-born beauty still struggles with her dark skin as an adult.

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"When I was younger, I had trouble accepting my skin," she tells Good Morning America. "I grew up in Kenya around very many dark people, but I grew up with a lot of light skin on TV and in the books I read and it made me feel uncomfortable with my skin color.

"I had a younger sister that was born a lot lighter than me and she got cooed... and told how pretty she was, and I realized that it was in the omission of those words when it came to me that made me feel unworthy and so it took a while for me to find my stride and learn to love the skin I'm in.

"So I wrote this book to help little kids get there a little faster."

She adds, "Some of my favorite books when I was growing up were Cinderella and Thumbelina and Beauty & the Beast... and these were all women with light skin and blonde hair and so I thought that in order to make it into the pages of book, you have to be light.

"In fact, one of the first times I drew my family, I drew them with light skin... I wrote this to give dark-skinned kids a chance to live in a world of imagination and magic."

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The Black Panther star previously said she didn't know she was Black until she arrived in America.

She believes race is a "social construct" because, growing up in Kenya, she never thought of herself as "Black".

"As much as I was experiencing colorism in Kenya, I wasn't aware that I belonged to a race called Black," she told BBC Newsnight.

She said she only realized she was Black when she moved to America, "because suddenly the term Black was being ascribed to me and it meant certain things that I was not accustomed to."

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To hear the Democrats tell it, former President Barack Obama and Joe Biden are two brothers from a different mother. But according to an upcoming book, there was no love lost between Obama and his vice president.

The 'bromance' between Barack Obama and Joe Biden was more of a figment of Biden's imagination, according to the book: Barack and Joe: The Making of an Extraordinary Partnership.

The book, written by Steven Levingston, is set to be published by Hachette Books on October 8.

The book explores the secret animosity Obama held for Biden, whom he refused to endorse in 2016 or 2020.

"Barack had placed his bet on Hillary, the one he believed would confirm his revolutionary stamp on American's political culture - the first black president passing the baton to the first woman president," Levingston writes.

To save face, Biden claims he never asked Obama to endorse him, but he was offended when Obama met with other potential presidential candidates.

During a rambling speech by Biden in the early 2000s, Obama rolled his eyes and passed a note to his adviser Robert Gibbs, saying: "Shoot. Me. Now."

According to Levingston, Obama harbored a thinly veiled hatred for bumbling Joe Biden. He thought Biden was error prone and had a fast and loose tongue.

Obama reportedly with Biden to ask him not to run for president. Obama's choice for the nomination is California Senator Kamala Harris.