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Condoleezza Rice shared her thoughts about public schools teaching critical race theory (CRT) to children on ABC's The View.

Rice appeared on Wednesday's episode of The View with co-hosts Whoopi Goldberg, Sunny Hostin, Joy Behar, and Sara Haines.

Rice, the 2nd Black U.S. secretary of state in history, said parents ought to have a say in what their children are taught in schools.

She noted that home schooling is increasing in the United States because parents are fed up with the liberal curriculum in schools.

"[Parents] are actually homeschooling [children] in increasing numbers. And I think that's a signal," Rice said.

"First of all, parents ought to be involved in their children's education... I think parents ought to have a say. We used to have parent-teacher conferences; We used to have [Parent-Teacher Association's]. There are lots of ways for parents to be involved, and they should be."

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Rice, 66, said CRT was not helpful to Black or white students and that white students were being made to feel guilty for systemic racism in the United States.

"The way we're talking about race is that it either seems so big that somehow white people now have to feel guilty for everything that happened in the past," said Rice.

Rice added that she didn't feel teaching CRT in schools was "productive" to Black or white children.

"I don't think that's very productive or Black people feel disempowered by race. I would like Black kids to be completely empowered to know they are beautiful in their Blackness, but in order to do that, I don't have to make white kids feel bad for being white. So, somehow this is a conversation that has gone in the wrong direction."

Rice added:

"We teach the good and we teach the bad of history. But what we don't do is make 7- and 10-year-olds feel that they are somehow bad people because of the color of their skin."

Watch the video below.
 

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School districts around the country include LGBT+ history and LGBT+ rights in school curriculum.

In one school district in Minnesota, heterosexual high school students are being asked to participate in LGBT+ sexual role-playing in the classroom.

The curriculum involves coaching children to role-play adult sexual scenarios.

The role-playing exercises are part of the "Comprehensive Sexuality Education" (CSE) program.

The curriculum was designed by Advocates for Youth, a group that is partnered with Planned Parenthood, according to reports.

The role-playing is part of the "3R" principle, which stands for "rights, respect, responsibility."

The teenagers are given examples of sexual relationships and they are asked to role play the scenarios.

The role-playing examples include:

"Terrence" is described as "You date girls you like, but haven't done much sexually with them; you've kissed a couple of them, but didn't find it very exciting. Now you feel very attracted to Morgan. When you kissed him last week, it felt wonderful, but also confusing. You just can't stop thinking about Morgan and imagining his touch. You think you want to have sex with him, but you don’t want your family or friends to find out, because they would disapprove."

Two girls, "Andie" and "Diana" are alone in a basement and considering having sex. Andie thinks Diana "is great and feel that this could be the relationship you've always wanted. You've never felt like this before and don't want to do anything to turn Diana off. You feel open to all kinds of things with Diana, including commitment and sex. You plan to use protection if you and Diana decide to have sex."

"Zee", a biological girl, is considering having sex with trans teen "Sydney", a biological boy who identifies as a girl: "Biologically you were assigned female at birth but you hate all of the boxes that society puts people in and identify as genderqueer. You work hard to have a gender-nonconforming appearance and style. You enjoy gender-bending and you feel like with Sydney you have finally met someone who really 'gets you.'"

Teenagers who are resistant to the role-playing exercise are taken aside and lectured about homophobia, intolerance and acceptance of others.

Then the entire class is asked "to reflect on what's happening and why. Direct the students back to your class ground rules — and reinforce the agreement to be respectful — and that making homophobic comments is not respectful."

Parents can opt their teenage children out of the class at any time. One school district denied asking elementary school children to role play.

Richfield Public Schools in Minnesota issued a statement to Yahoo News.

"We do NOT teach elementary students about anal sex, show them graphic images, or ask them to role play, as has been reported by some media outlets. There are no activities in the secondary curriculum that have students role-playing situations in front of the entire classroom."

Parents protested the curriculum at a Richfield Public School board meeting (below)
 

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The entire Hudson School Board in Ohio must resign or face child porn charges over a sexual writing assignment given to students.

Hudson Mayor Craig Schubert announced his decision at a school board meeting on Monday, after students at Hudson High School were given sexually explicit writing assignments.

Students in the Liberal Arts II writing class were told to "write a sex scene you wouldn't show your mom," and "Describe your favorite part of a man's body using only verbs."

The students were also instructed to "Write an X-rated Disney scenario."

It isn't clear if the teacher who handed out the assignments must also resign or face criminal charges.

Red-faced Mayor Schubert spoke at a school board meeting, garnering loud applause from outraged parents who read the papers their children wrote.

Schubert told the school board he spoke with a judge who confirmed that the students' writings could be considered child pornography.

"It has come to my attention that your educators are distributing essentially what is child pornography in the classroom.

"I've spoken to a judge this evening and she's already confirmed that. So I'm going to give you a simple choice: either choose to resign from this board of education or you will be charged."

The mayor then stormed out of the room to loud applause from the angry parents.

The Hudson School Board members include one female and 5 males.

According to Dailymail.com, "Ohio law prohibits sending 'harmful' or obscene material to, or sharing it with, a minor, though this statute usually refers to sexting or sending obscene images."

Parent Monica Havens, a public school teacher for 11 years, told The Plain Dealer:

"I can't even wrap my brain around as a teacher, I don't care if it's for college credit, these are minors. When these topics are encouraged and read by adults, that is pedophilia.

"This is grooming, and all of you need to be replaced,' Havens told the school board. "You have dedicated yourself to woke social justice."

Watch the video below.
 

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Nikole Hannah-Jones is refusing to teach at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill after her tenure was blocked following her controversial work on the 1619 Project.

The 1619 Project is named for the year the first African slaves were brought to the English colony of Virginia.

Nikole Hannah-Jones won a Pulitzer Prize for her work on the 1619 Project, a collection of essays, podcasts and poems developed by Hannah-Jones, writers from The New York Times, and The New York Times Magazine.

The 1619 Project "aims to reframe the country's history" by declaring the birth of the nation occurred when African slaves first arrived on America's shores.

Scholars criticized the 1619 Project, and even The New York Times disputed the date of the arrival of the first enslaved Africans.

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In this historical photo, freed slaves are pictured on the deck of the USS Vermont. The U.S. Navy hired freed slaves during the Civil War in 1861.

Last year, Hannah-Jones was invited to teach at her alma mater the UNC's Hussman School of Journalism as the Knight Chair in Race and Investigative Journalism.

The Knight Chair is usually offered tenure -- a guaranteed permanent teaching position at the school.

The last two Knight Chairs were granted tenure upon their appointments.

However, Hannah-Jones was furious to learn her application for tenure had been rejected by the University Board of Trustees.

Walter E. Hussman Jr., a millionaire news mogul who donated $25 million to the journalism school named after him, was among the donors who objected to Hannah-Jones' hiring.

The donors criticized the validity of the 1619 Project and questioned Hannah-Jones's credentials.

The decision faced backlash from her peers in the new industry, students and athletes, who wrote letters supporting her.

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A Wisconsin high school principal has apologized for separating white people from people of color to discuss police brutality in Zoom meetings.

West High School Principal Karen Boran sent two separate email links to parents fpr Zoom meetings. One link was for parents "of color" and the other link went to white parents, according to The Federalist.

Parents were invited to "join the Zoom space where you most closely identify" to discuss "all the police brutality and violence that is going on."

The Wisconsin Institute for Law and Liberty (WILL) sent a letter to Madison Metropolitan School District Superintendent Carlton Jenkins explaining the problems with racial segregation in 2021.

According to WILL, the email discriminated against parents who weren't white or Black.

"Racial segregation is never beneficial or benign. It is our hope that the leadership at MMSD take this opportunity to commit the school district to the principle of equality and end all racial segregation immediately," wrote Dan Lennington, WILL deputy counsel.

West High School Principal Karen Boran apologized , telling the Wisconsin State Journal that her email "did not convey our intention in a manner that supports our core values." She added that the "wording in the communication we sent lacked clarity."

West High School was also criticized for separating people by their skin color during an affinity event last year.

Last summer, the school hosted "virtual discussion spaces" for students and staff separated by skin color.

The high school administration apologized then, too.

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Divorce rates have spiked in America during the Covid-19 lockdowns. The divorce rate, normally the highest in the world, is 34 percent higher from March through June compared to 2019, according to the NY Post.

One Texas school teacher hoped a new lesson would help change the relationship dynamics between males and females that lead to higher divorce rates.

Titled "Rules for Chivalry", the class assignment teaches young students how to be proper ladies and gentlemen.

The rules for girls include "dress in a feminine manner to please men", "address all men respectfully by title" and "obey any reasonable request by a male".

Additionally, girls are instructed to "walk behind men", not to "criticize men" or "complain or whine".

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There were also a set of rules for boys, instructing them to "dress in jackets and ties or suits", "treat ladies with respect", "show courtesy and assist women", assist ladies to seat themselves at a table, and "pay for all expenses during dates".

These rules are routinely taught to children in other cultures where the divorce rates are significantly lower than in America.

Despite the fact that the rules have proven effective in other cultures, the class was canceled due to the fierce public backlash.

The Shallowater school district released a statement saying the assignment "does not reflect our district and community values. The matter has been addressed with the teacher, and the assignment was removed."

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On Sept. 9, the Atlanta school board met in secret and voted not to extend Superintendent Meria Carstarphen's contract, which expires June 30, 2020.

Carstarphen's ouster divided the city and sparked widespread condemnation of the school board for holding a secret majority vote by a public body. Parents called into local radio shows to express their outrage over Carstarphen's ouster.

Carstarphen's forced departure made national news.

As Superintendent of Atlanta Public Schools, Carstarphen (pictured left) led the district's nearly 52,000 students, 6,000 full-time employees and 87 schools and oversaw the system’s $1 billion annual budget.

Verdaillia Turner, educator and president of 1,700-member Atlanta Federation of Teachers, says the Atlanta school board should be "transparent" in its search for a replacement for Carstarphen.

In a guest column published in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Turner said the school board should listen to the advice of educators rather than business interests that played a key role in selecting Carstarphen.

She accused the APS of entering into long-term contracts with companies and organizations that favor privatization under the banner of charter schools.

And she urged the APS to choose a superintendent who believes in public education.

"Hiring a superintendent is a monumental task and the Atlanta Board of Education should learn from the recent past to avoid pitfalls that could have serious ramifications for the future of the school system," she writes.

"Atlanta Public Schools needs a superintendent who will implement models that have been proven to work, such as the Community Schools approach that emphasizes meeting the whole family’s needs, real family engagement, community partnerships, and wrap-around services.

She added: "In a city such as Atlanta where most students suffer from poverty, this model is especially needed. A recent study identified Atlanta as the city with the least economic mobility for poor children."

Turner also criticized the school board for selecting Carstarphen, a Tulane and Auburn graduate, who has little teaching experience.

"Shouldn't a superintendent have spent time in the classroom interacting with students, parents, and other teachers?" she wrote.

Atlanta public schools are among the lowest performing schools in the nation. The Atlanta school district is still digging out from under the teacher cheating scandal of 2009.

Top teachers and principals in the Atlanta Public Schools were arrested for cheating on state-administered standardized tests. The teachers have since been released from prison.

NBA superstar LeBron James opened his first elementary school for at-risk students in his hometown of Akron, Ohio on Monday, July 30. "If we get to them early enough, we can hopefully keep them on the right track to a bigger and brighter future for themselves and their families,” the father-of-3 said at a press conference in the school's temporary building on Monday, July 30.

I Promise School

The school serves 240 of Akron's most academically challenged students. The students were chosen from a random pool of underachieving 3rd and 4th graders with the lowest marks on aptitude tests.

Akron's biggest success story missed 83 days of school in the 4th grade. LeBron's dream is to give the children something he never had growing up: a quality education and to know that someone cares.

“This school is so important to me because our vision is to create a place for the kids in Akron who need it most -- those that could fall through the cracks if we don’t do something,” he said.

The I Promise school is part of Akron Public Schools. The district paid $2.9 million out of its general fund for the landscaping, furniture, teacher's salaries, books, and other essentials. The LeBron James Family foundation pays for everything else, including 4 extra teachers to allow for smaller classrooms.

The school is housed in a temporary building owned by the district. The walls are lined with LeBron's game worn shoes and inspirational quotes by LeBron.

I Promise School principal Brandi Davis

LeBron tapped educator Brandi Davis to be the school's first principal. By 2022, the school will have 1,000 students in 1st through eighth grades.

The students, who began their first day on Monday, were given clothing, jackets, bicycles, helmets, as well as free breakfast, lunch and snacks. And a food pantry is set up in the school for children who don't have enough food at home.

Students who live over 2 miles away get free transportation to and from school.

If the students graduate, a college education awaits them at the University of Akron.

Education begins at home, so the students' parents are offered job placement and the opportunity to continue their education or earn their high school diplomas, ESPN reports.

“We want every kid who walks through this school to be inspired,” James told CNN. “To come away with something. Something where they can give back and it doesn’t matter -- it could be anything, but just for kids, in general, all they want to know is that someone cares. And when they walk through that door, I hope they know that someone cares.”

 

 

The kid from Akron with his kids from Akron. #IPROMISE #WeAreFamily

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