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A former Secret Service agent was honored to serve as Michelle Obama's protector, but one aspect of her job troubled her.

Evy Poumpouras told Insider that she "could do nothing" when witnessing racist comments or signs targeting the former first lady.

Poumpouras served as Mrs. Obama's Secret Service agent during Michelle and Barack Obama's time at the White House. She also protected George W. Bush, Bill Clinton, and George H.W. Bush during her 12 years in the secret service, according to Insider.

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In her 2020 memoir, "Becoming Bulletproof," Poumpouras recalled feeling "outraged" when people hurled racist slurs or directed a racist sign at the former first lady.

"As the first Black First Lady of the United States, Mrs. Obama had to withstand certain kinds of disparagement that none of her predecessors ever faced," Poumpouras wrote. "I was on her protective detail when we were driving to a school to deliver a speech; we passed someone on a bridge holding up a shockingly racist sign directed at her."

"I remember feeling outraged -- after all, it was part of our job to protect the first family mentally as well as physically. But if the First Lady saw the sign, she gave no indication of it," she added.

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Poumpouras told Insider there was "no protocol" in place to deal with Americans who expressed their freedom of speech.

"I could do nothing," she told Insider. "There's freedom of speech in the United States, and even if I personally feel that speech is wrong, the law doesn't give me the power to take that person's speech away."

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A new study recently published by a college professor finds that the American media portrayal of Black men "perpetuates many of the same, negative patterns that are common in popular culture."

Armon Perry, a professor of social work at the University of Louisville, spent two decades reviewing research on Black men and families.

The research falls into one of two categories: many Black men are "disproportionately low income," and "poor Black men reject monogamous romantic relationships in favor of a hypersexual masculinity to overcompensate for their inability to fulfill the traditional breadwinner role."

Other studies found that Black males desire intimacy and companionship in stable relationships. But the economic disparities they face in every day American society is one of the factors in their struggles to maintain stable monogamous relationships.

In his 4 year study, Perry followed 33 Black men from Louisville, Kentucky. He found that "the near-exclusive focus on low-income Black men in research related to the family skews perceptions of these men."

He found that the skewed perceptions of low income men reinforce negative stereotypes that portray Black males as dangerous and predatory.

Many of the Black men Perry interviewed credited their partners with making them better husbands, fathers and men.

According to one of the participants, "I always tell her that I couldn't have become who I am without her. Meeting the right person... is probably the most important decision I've made in my life."

Perry's findings, which counter the popular image that society holds of Black men, are published in his book: "Black Love Matters: Authentic Men's Voices on Marriage and Romantic Relationships."

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Barack Obama's new book broke records for his book publisher Penguin Random House. The news comes as supporters of the former U.S. president celebrate his "third term in office."

Obama's new book, A Promised Land, released on Nov. 17, sold 1.7 million units in all formats and editions in the U.S. and Canada to date.

The first week sales of 887,000 units is a first-day record for the book publishing house.

The first-week sales stand as the largest one-week total for any book ever released by Penguin Random House.

Obama promoted the book with an interview on Power 105.1's Breakfast Club last week. Co-host Charlamagne tha god held Obama's feet to the fire by demanding to know why he didn't do more for Black people in his first 2 terms in office.

Co-host DJ Envy also pressed Obama to explain why he uplifted LGBT+ people over Black people who have suffered for 200 years.

Obama said he was confident that he did more for Black people than current President Donald Trump.

He also blamed Republicans for blocking his attempts to pass laws for Black people. But Democrats held the majority in both the House and the Senate in Obama's first 2 years in office.

Obama was asked to name his specific pro-Black laws that Congress blocked, but he danced around the answer.
 

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