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Civil rights activist Vernon Jordan passed away on Monday, according to a statement from his family. He was 85.

Jordan was a power broker and an influential figure in American politics. He was a former president of the National Urban League and was a close advisor and counselor to President Bill Clinton.

Jordan, who was born and raised in Atlanta, Georgia, was rejected for a summer internship with an insurance company after his sophomore year in college because of his race.

Jordan graduated from DePauw University in Greencastle, Indiana, in 1957. He was the only Black student in a class of 400.

He received a J.D. degree from Howard University School of Law in 1960.

Jordan returned to Atlanta, where he rose to prominence as a civil rights activist after joining the law office of Donald L. Hollowell.

The law firm sued the University of Georgia for racial discrimination in its admission policies. The suit was settled out of court when the school agreed to admit two Black students, Charlayne Hunter and Hamilton E. Holmes.

Jordan personally escorted Hunter past a group of angry white protesters to the university admissions office.

After leaving private law practice in the early 1960s, Jordan was named the Georgia field director for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).

In 1970, Jordan became executive director of the United Negro College Fund (UNCF). He served as president of the National Urban League from 1971 to 1981.

On May 29, 1980, Jordan was shot and seriously wounded while accompanied by a white woman, Martha Coleman, outside the Marriott Inn in Fort Wayne, Indiana.

He was visited in the hospital by then-president Jimmy Carter. The visit was the first story ever covered by the new cable network CNN.

Joseph Paul Franklin, a white man, was acquitted in 1982 of charges of attempted murder. He later admitted he was the shooter. Franklin was convicted of several murders and received six life sentences, as well as two death sentences. He was executed by lethal injection in 2013 at age 63.

Jordan leaves behind his second wife, Ann Jordan, and a daughter from his first marriage, Vickee Jordan Adams, in addition to nine grandchildren, seven by Ann Jordan's three children, Janice, Mercer, and Toni.

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On Monday, January 18, Americans celebrate the birth of the late civil rights icon Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Dr. King was born Michael King Jr. in Atlanta, Georgia, on January 15, 1929. He was assassinated on April 4, 1968 in Memphis, Tennessee.

Among the luminaries remembering Dr. King today is Star Trek veteran Nichelle Nichols who played Lt. Nyota Uhura in the original TV series.

In an interview with Emmy Legends, the iconic actress said Dr. King was a fan of Star Trek and he convinced her to stay on when she considered quitting the series.

Nichols said she'd already turned in her resignation when she had a chance meeting with King at an event.

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"I was to be a celebrity guest at some fundraiser in Beverly Hills," she said. "I believe that it was a NAACP fundraiser, but it might not have been but I think it was. And so, I went to do this on that Saturday night and I had just been taken to the desk and sat down when the organizer came over and said, 'Ms. Nichols, How are you? Listen, there's someone here who says that he's your biggest fan and he's desperate to meet you. He REALLY wants to meet you!' And I said, 'Well thank you!'

"...I turn and instead of a fan, there's this face that the WHOLE world knows with this beautiful smile on and I remember thinking, 'Whoever that fan is, is going to have to wait because Dr. King; Dr. Martin Luther King my leader is walking toward me about 10 feet away with a beautiful smile on his face!' and then this man says, 'Yes Ms. Nichols. I am THAT fan! I am your best fan, your greatest fan. And my family are your greatest fans. As a matter of fact, this is the ONLY show that my wife Coretta and I will allow our little children to watch; to stay up and watch because it's on past their bedtime.' And I said – which is all I was able to say because my mouth was open and closed. He said, 'We admire you greatly you know. The manner in which you create this role has dignity...' and before he said anything else I said, 'Dr. King, thank you so much.'"

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Nichols told King she was leaving the show because her true love was Broadway and the theater.

"And he said, 'What do you mean?' Dead serious. 'What are you talking about?' I said, 'I'm going to leave Star Trek because I have an offer to star in a Broadway.' I never got that far [laughs]... he said, "You cannot!" and I felt like that little boy Arnold like – Whatchu talkin’ about Dr. King? But you know I didn’t say that! I was taken aback and I didn’t say anything. I just looked at him. He said, 'If you leave Nichelle, Gene Roddenberry has opened a door for the world to see us. If you leave, that door can be closed because your role is not a Black role and it's NOT a female role. He can fill it with anything including an alien.'"

Nichols took the weekend to think it over. On Monday, she went to Gene Roddenberry's office to retract her resignation.

"I told him what happened and I said, 'If you still want me to stay, I'll stay. I have to.' And he opened his drawer and her looked up at me and said, 'God Bless Dr. Martin Luther King. Somebody knows where I am coming from!' and I said, 'That's what he said! [in my brain], and he took out my resignation which was torn into a hundred pieces and handed me the pile, and we just stood there looking at each other and I finally said, 'Thank you Gene.' And he said to me, 'Thank you Nichelle.' And my life has never been the same since and I've never looked back..."
 

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Black Twitter expressed outrage over Joe Biden's dismissive demeanor during a Dec. 8 Zoom call with Black civil rights leaders.

According to those who listened to the nearly 2-hour audio, Biden "talked down" to the civil rights leaders, including Rev. Al Sharpton, who later defended Biden, saying he was not dismissive at all.

The presumptive president-elect reportedly said the "defund the police" movement "beat the living hell out of" Democrats during the November elections.

He also said Hispanics, who are double the population of Black people in America, will outnumber white people soon.

One group that was not invited to the table was Black Lives Matter, who continue to complain that Biden is ignoring them.

Here are some of the YouTube comments in response to the leaked audio:

"I don't think a lot of people realize how racist Joe Biden is. It's impossible for him to talk 'to' black people, he's always talked 'at' us."

"Biden has a tone of SCOLDING them as though he was expecting nothing but praise. I thought the point of the meeting was to SPEAK about the issues."

"Omg. You can't have a conversation with the guy. Nothing will get done. He's defensive because he knows he's not on the side of the working class."

"Biden is commit to raising up dozens of already affluent black people, while continuing the tradition of screwing over millions of poor black people."

"This is embarrassing. He's speaking to ppl as though they are children."
 

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Civil rights leader and U.S. congressman John Lewis passed away on Friday after a battle with cancer. He was 80.

Lewis, a member of the U.S. House of Representatives and a key figure in the civil rights movement in the 1960s, passed away a year after confirming he was battling stage four pancreatic cancer.

He was a Democrat, who represented a majority Black district covering most of Atlanta, Georgia.

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Lewis, left, is pictured with (L-R) civil rights leader C.T. Vivian, Reverend Martin Luther King Jr., and Lester McKinnie at Fisk University, an HBCU in Nashville on May 05, 1964. Rev. C.T. Vivian died this week in Atlanta at age 95.

Lewis was one of the 'Big Six' civil rights leaders, which included Martin Luther King, Jr., and he helped organize the historic 1963 March on Washington.

Upon news of his death on July 17, representatives from civil rights group the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) tweeted that they were "deeply saddened," noting: "His life-long mission for justice, equality and freedom left a permanent impression on our nation and world. The NAACP extends our sincerest condolences to his family, and we send prayers of comfort and strength to all."

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Blood-splattered Freedom Riders, John Lewis (left) and James Zwerg (right) stand together after being attacked and beaten by pro-segregationists in Montgomery, Alabama on May 20, 1961.

In a statement, former President Barack Obama said he had spoken with Lewis after a virtual town hall with a group of activists following the death of George Floyd.

Obama added that Lewis could not have been prouder of their efforts, writing, "a new generation standing up for freedom and equality".

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"Not many of us get to live to see our own legacy play out in such a meaningful, remarkable way. John Lewis did," he said. "And thanks to him, we now all have our marching orders - to keep believing in the possibility of remaking this country we love until it lives up to its full promise."

The White House praised Lewis' legacy on Twitter, and Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds ordered flags at half-staff in honor of Lewis.

President Trump, who arrived at his Virginia golf course around 9:15 a.m. Saturday -- minutes after Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany tweeted about Lewis, did not acknowledge the civil rights leader's death on Twitter.

Lewis' death comes a week after a U.S. Congresswoman prematurely tweeted that he had died on July 11.

"It's only rumors," Michael Collins told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. "He is resting comfortably at home."

Congresswoman Alma S. Adams, who initially tweeted Lewis had died, apologized for her error.

"We deeply regret a previous tweet based on a false news report." According to AJC, "a blog that focuses on news about historically black colleges & universities" also falsely reported that Lewis was dead on July 11.

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Monday, Jan. 20, is Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, a federal holiday in America. Black Twitter users sent the hashtag #MLKDay trending on the social media platform.

The hashtag generated tens of thousands of tweets paying tribute to the slain civil rights leader. But one tweet in particular caught Black Twitter's eye.

The tweet was sent by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), who many accused of tapping Dr. King's phones in motel rooms and sending tapes of his sexual exploits to his wife, Coretta Scott King, pictured below with King and their first child, Yolanda King, in 1956.

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The tweet accompanied a nighttime photo of a memorial to Dr. King installed at the entrance to the FBI Academy in Quantico, Virginia.

"Today, the FBI honors the life and work of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. A quote from Dr. King is etched in stone at the FBI Academy's reflection garden in Quantico as a reminder to all students and FBI employees: "The time is always right to do what is right." #MLKDay

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As they do every year when the FBI remembers King on his holiday, Black Twitter was ready to throw jabs and daggers.

Not willing to let bygones be bygones Black Twitter reminded the FBI that ex-director J. Edgar Hoover tapped Dr. King's phones and hounded him to his grave.

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Zhukova Dasha

Buro 24/7 website editor-in-chief Miroslava Duma sparked outrage by publishing an interview with Garage magazine editor-in-chief Zhukova Dasha. A photo accompanying the interview shows Zhokova posing on a 'black woman chair'. Zuma, who posted the image on her Instagram and Facebook pages, defended the photo as a work of art. But some are calling it 'racist art'.

Sensitive art critics bristled at the fact that Zuma posted the image during the celebration of civil rights icon Martin Luther King Jr's birthday.

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