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Three federal pandemic aid programs, including extended unemployment benefits, expired on Labor Day for millions of Americans.

On Sept. 6, an estimated 8.9 million people lost all unemployment benefits. Those Americans who have gone a year-and-a-half without a steady paycheck will be hardest hit.

A federal eviction moratorium already expired last month.

Gig worker benefits and self-employed benefits have also expired on Labor Day. Progressives are pushing the Biden administration to extend unemployment benefits beyond Sept. 6.

"We need to extend the expanded UI for millions of unemployed workers because this crisis isn't over," said Rep. Jamaal Bowman, a Democrat, in a statement to Newsweek.

"We're still in a pandemic, and the latest jobs numbers prove that. Doing our part to support Americans right now includes extending expanded [unemployment insurance benefits] and passing the $3.5 trillion infrastructure package to invest in our people and economy."

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Unemployment benefits were previously extended by Congress in March. But the Biden administration has indicated they will not extend unemployment again.

All 50 Senate Democrats have said they won't extend unemployment benefits past Labor Day.

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Social experts believe the end of federal benefits will put a stop to violence in the nation's airports and on budget airlines.
 
READ ALSO: Biden appoints commission to study why Black people brawl in airports
 
According to a recent study, the increase in fights at airports were directly related to excess government benefits. Unemployment and stimulus checks allows more freedom for people who would normally stay home and fight.

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A judge has blocked a Las Vegas woman from collecting $230,000 after she lied about being a single mom to three girls.

CNN helped raise $233,000 for Dasha Kelly after she was interviewed about the eviction moratorium in early August.

Kelly told CNN reporter Nick Watt she is a "single mom" of three girls, ages 5, 6 and 8, and she feared they would end up on the street.
 
READ ALSO: CNN raised $230K for woman who lied about being mom to three children
 
During the report Kelly dabbed her dry eyes with a wad of tissue, as she explained she owed $1,900 in back rent.

CNN promoted Kelly's GoFundMe account which raised over $233,000. Kelly later confessed she lied about being the mother of the three girls.

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Kelly told Watt she was babysitting the girls for her boyfriend, their biological father. She said the children have a home - with their biological mother.

The girls' biological mother, Shadia Hilo, sued GoFundMe to freeze the funds, according to Hilo's attorney, Marc Randazza.

Atlanta Black Star reported a Las Vegas judge has blocked Kelly's access to the funds.

In court documents, Hilo stated Kelly "exploited the children for financial gain in a fraudulent fundraising scheme."

In a statement, Randazza said:

"The judge decided, at least based on what he had seen in the case so far, we had a substantial likelihood of success on the merits, and that it would be fair and equitable to lock the money up so the kids don't have it, Ms. Kelly doesn't have it. The money is just sitting right where it was until further action by the court."

Randazza told the court he and Hilo offered to split the $233,000 four ways between Kelly and the three girls. However, Kelly declined the offer.

After Randazza contacted GoFundMe, the crowdfunding site gave donors the option to ask for refunds. Subsequently, the $233,000 decreased to a little more than $162,000.

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The U.S. Supreme Court reversed the Biden administration's temporary eviction moratorium in a 6-3 decision late Thursday.

Millions of people who haven't paid rent since March 2020 face the risk of losing their homes following the Supreme Court's 6-3 decision.

The SCOTUS ruled that the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) did not have the legal authority to impose a temporary ban on evictions.

The Supreme Court wrote:

"The CDC has imposed a nationwide moratorium on evictions in reliance on a decades-old statute that authorizes it to implement measures like fumigation and pest extermination.

"It strains credulity to believe that this statute grants the CDC the sweeping authority that it asserts."

 
READ ALSO: Judge overturns CDC's eviction moratorium; 'Eviction bans do more harm than good'
 
The Supreme Court ruling ends protections for 3.5 million people that was originally scheduled to expire in early October.

More than 400,000 renters in the Atlanta area are behind on their rent.

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White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki said in a statement:

"The Biden Administration is disappointed that the Supreme Court has blocked the most recent CDC eviction moratorium while confirmed cases of the Delta variant are significant across the country.

"As a result of this ruling, families will face the painful impact of evictions, and communities across the country will face greater risk of exposure to COVID-19."

Conservatives said the ruling "ends an unlawful policy" that "restores property rights in America."

The reaction from liberals was swift. Congresswoman Cori Bush (D-Mo.) lashed out at the SCOTUS's decision, saying "Congress must act immediately to prevent mass evictions."

"This is cruel and wrong," tweeted Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D-Wash.).

"If the public health crisis hasn't ended, then the relief to survive it shouldn't either. We must immediately do everything possible to keep people in their homes. This is a matter of life and death."

And New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio called the SCOTUS Justices "A group of right wing extremists" who "just decided to throw families out of their homes during a global pandemic."

Congress previously approved $46.5 billion in emergency rental assistance, but only $5.1 billion has been paid out so far.
 

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CNN has egg on their faces after they were conned into raising $230,000 by a woman who lied about being a single mom to three girls.

CNN viewers donated to Dasha Kelly's GoFundMe account after she was interviewed about the recent eviction moratorium lapse.

Kelly told CNN reporter Nick Watt she is a "single mom" of three girls who faced eviction and they could all end up on the street.

During the report Kelly dabbed her dry eyes with a wad of tissue, as she explained she owed $1,900 in back rent.

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Congresswoman Cori Bush (right) vowed to help Kelly and other single mothers like her.

"Dasha Kelly has started a GoFundMe page to try and cover that rent, $2,000. It’s a Hail Mary, she says she's praying for a miracle, hoping for a miracle," Watt told CNN viewers.
 
READ ALSO: The Internet says single mom with 11 children is a scammer
 
The GoFundMe raised over $230,000 for Kelly, who later admitted she lied about being the mother of the girls.

She told Watt the girls have a home -- with their real mother.

She said she is the girlfriend of the children's father, and the girls were staying with them for the summer.

CNN ran a disclaimer on the online version of the story.

"After CNN aired a story about her potential eviction, Dasha Kelly clarified to CNN that she is not the mother of the three children featured in the story. CNN has verified she takes care of the children in her home for periods of time. She says she originally described herself to CNN as a mother because she considers herself to be like one to them."

GoFundMe says the cash in the account is frozen and no moneys were withdrawn.

This isn't the first time a woman "borrowed" someone else's children to defraud GoFundMe.

Last year Jessica Sumlin claimed she was a single mother of 11 children facing eviction.

Hundreds of people donated over $10,000 to her GoFundMe page.