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Travis Scott's Cactus Jack Foundation awarded $1 million to 100 Black college students to ensure they graduate this year.

Scott's Waymon Webster Scholarships, now in their second year, ensures Black students experiencing last-minute financial pressures graduated on time from college – a foundational component of Scott's Project HEAL Effort, announced earlier this year.

Family Effort: The scholarship is named for Travis Scott's grandfather, Waymon Webster, an HBCU educator, and spearheaded by Scott's sister, Jordan Webster – who graduated from Howard University herself this past week, according to a press release.

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Cactus Jack Foundation

Scott's Cactus Jack Foundation announced that it has awarded $1 million in scholarships for students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) to 100 members of the graduating class of 2022.

With Scott's support, the Waymon Webster Scholarship Fund granted $10,000 scholarships each to seniors who have reached academic excellence (averaging 3.5 or higher GPA) but have faced the all-too-common last-minute challenge of financial adversity in the second semester of their senior year.

The scholarships will bring 100 students over the finish line, diploma in hand. This is the second year that Scott has supported HBCUs and represents a tenfold increase.

The scholarship is named after Waymon Webster to honor his lifetime of dedication to academic excellence for Black students. This year's recipients include graduating seniors from 38 HBCUs, including Alabama A&M University, Central State University, Florida A&M University, Jackson State University, Morehouse College, Texas Southern University, Grambling State University, Xavier University of Louisiana, and Prairie View A&M University – Scott’s grandfather's alma mater where he also served as an educator.

Standout recipients include:

    1. Nisha Encarnacion, a graduate from Florida A&M University from St. Croix, US Virgin Islands, received a degree in Pharmacy. While supporting her mother and caring for her daughter throughout college, Nisha paid her own way to achieve her dream. View her thank you here.

    2. Chisom Okwor, a computer science graduate from Fisk University passionate about the technology industry, specifically the inclusive and improvement of representation in the tech space. Chisom's goal is to use technology to transform developing countries in Africa. View her thank you here.

    3. Jordan Massey, a mass communications graduate with a concentration in broadcast journalism from North Carolina Central University, has incurred personal debt to achieve his goal of graduating college and entering the field of communications. View his thank you here.

 
Travis Scott said: "Excellence abounds in every Black household, but too often opportunity does not – and Black students are left behind or counted out. So that's what my family and I set out to change. We congratulate all 100 scholarship recipients this year. I know we will see great things from them – and we are already looking forward to increasing our work next year."

Jordan Webster, Project Manager for the Cactus Jack Foundation's Waymon Webster Scholarship Fund, a recent Howard University graduate, and sister to Travis Scott, said: "Last week, I received my own diploma from Howard University. I know personally how deeply important my grandfather's academic legacy at HBCUs is to my entire family – to Travis, as well as my twin brother Josh who is at Prairie View A&M University – and now, to 100 people that Travis has been able to help out at a tough time. It means the world to me to be able to work with my brother as he creates hope and makes a real difference for our peers and their families."

Marc Morial, President and CEO of the National Urban League, said: "Black students are less than half as likely to graduate from college as white students, and financial pressure is the primary reason. We applaud Travis Scott and the Cactus Jack Foundation for investing in the next generation and congratulate the 100 Waymon Webster Scholarship recipients on their graduation."

Daniel Moss, Executive Director of the HBCU Foundation, said: "In a warm and tremendously thoughtful gesture, Mr. Scott has made a lifelong impact on the 100 Waymon Webster Scholarship recipients. To have now eased, even slightly, the financial burden on these deserving HBCU graduates, Mr. Scott has set into motion a kind of investment that will pay infinite dividends into our communities for decades to come."

Source: Press release

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Howard University in Washington, D.C. is among the HBCU schools receiving bomb threats on the first day of Black History Month Tuesday.

The school issued emergency alerts and shelter-in-place directives to students and faculty about the campus-wide lockdown on Tuesday.

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More than a dozen other HBCUs received bomb threats on Tuesday morning, the start of Black History Month.

Bethune-Cookman University, Southern University, Albany State University, Bowie State University and Delaware State University also received bomb threats.

"We don't know who's behind this, but we do know it's motivated by hate," Howard University President Wayne Frederick said Tuesday. "We've had these challenges before but definitely since I've been here [as a student] in 1988, it has not been this widespread and also, I think, this overt."

The list of historically Black schools receiving bomb threats in recent weeks include Morgan State University in Maryland, Coppin State University in Maryland, Fort Valley State University in Georgia, Kentucky State University, Xavier University of Louisiana, Edward Waters University in Florida, Alcorn State University and Mississippi Valley State University, Rust College in MS, Spelman College in Atlanta, Jackson State University, and Tougaloo College in MS, among others.

The FBI have investigated and no bombs were found on any of the HBCU campuses.

So far, there are no suspects.

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Ferrara Candy Company

The Now and Later candy Brand teams with Keshia Knight Pulliam and Terrence J to celebrate the "art of the hustle" with two scholarships totaling $20,000 for current HBCU students.

In its inaugural year, Now and Later is partnering with Clark Atlanta University's (CAU) Mass Media Arts department based in Atlanta, Georgia, and the Cathy Hughes School of Communications at Howard University in Washington, D.C., to showcase the impact of the HBCU experience and inspire the next generation of Black leaders.

Each school will receive a $10,000 donation to create a scholarship fund for participating students, according to a press release. Each school will host a virtual seminar where students will have a chance to draw inspiration from influential HBCU alumni, who have notably mastered the "art of the hustle" across various industries.

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CAU's class will be led by Keshia Knight Pulliam, Emmy-nominated actress, entrepreneur, and venture capitalist. Pulliam, known for her roles in TV and film, is a proud HBCU graduate from the illustrious Spelman College. She has not only mastered her position in Hollywood, but also her position in the boardroom.

"I look forward to partnering with Now and Later on this program and sharing my personal and professional experience with the #RecognizeTheChew Class in Session students," Keshia Knight Pulliam says.

"This next generation of HBCU leaders are resilient, and I am honored to provide any helpful nuggets to help fuel their entrepreneurial passions."

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"HBCUs are major pillars in the Black community that reflect the very essence of Black excellence," said actor and philanthropist Terrence J, best known as the former host of BET's 106 & Park.

"As an HBCU alum, I am thrilled to partner with Now and Later on its #RecognizeTheChew Class in Session Series. HBCUs are major pillars in the Black community that reflect the very essence of Black excellence, and when married with a nostalgic brand like Now and Later the possibilities can't get any better!"

"Now and Later is a brand built on the values of hard work, resilience, transformation and authenticity. HBCU faculty, students and alumni embody these values daily," says Alnese Thomas, Brand Manager, Laffy Taffy & Now and Later. "It's a pleasure to support the incredible impact these institutions play in fostering some of the nation's most influential leaders."

"We appreciate Now and Later for selecting Clark Atlanta University's Mass Media Arts Department (MMA) as one of its first donation recipients. Gifts like this truly help our MMA students to complete their journey of becoming the communications industry's next top leaders," said Gary Yates, Associate Professor and Interim Department Chair.

Source: Ferrara Candy Company

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Professor Tip "T.I." Harris will join the faculty at Clark Atlanta University (CAU) to teach trap music to CAU students this Fall.

T.I. will teach a class titled the Origin, Culture and Business of Trap Music at Clark University this Fall.

The university is partnering with the three-time Grammy Award-winning recording artist, actor, producer, songwriter and entrepreneur to create an amazing experience for CAU undergraduate students this Fall, according to a press release.

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T.I. will be teaching alongside Dr. Melva Williams to bring an understanding of the origins of trap music.

"In higher education it is important that we challenge, empower and equip our students with the proper resources to excel," said CAU President George T. French Jr. "I believe the best way to do this is to understand their culture and create life-long experiences that will not only motivate our scholars but present them with opportunities to help them become globally competitive."

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"HBCUs have a vital role in our community and have managed to withstand even while being some of the most under-resourced institutions," said T.I. in a press release. "Our national HBCUs continue to underscore the fact that we have always had to do more with less. I am excited to be partnering with Clark Atlanta University in my hometown – Atlanta."

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"I applaud their innovative approach to ensuring their students are educated beyond the traditional textbook curriculum. I am honored to lend my voice and unique experiences to the betterment of today's young people and to do my part to lift the legacy of historical black colleges and universities across the nation," T.I. said.

Trap Music is a sub-genre of hip-hop music and is a cultural phenomenon that involves a variety of art forms. The genre has been embraced worldwide, has been infused with other types of music and has become a part of everyday living. The effect of Trap Music is well known, but the business of Trap Music and its ability to enlighten and educate will be explored on the campus of Clark Atlanta University.

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President Obama at Morehouse College

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Without elaborating, Mr. Obama said men in the black community continue to make bad choices. Obama, who is biracial, said he, too wrote off his failings as just another example of the world trying to keep a black man down. "Excuses are tools of the incompetent used to bridge bridges to nowhere and monuments of nothingness," he said to another smattering of polite applause.

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