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A federal judge overturned the Centers for Disease Control's nationwide ban on evictions.

On Wednesday, May 5, D.C. District Judge Dabney Friedrich ruled the CDC does not have legal authority to freeze evictions nationwide.

The CDC invoked the 1944 Public Health Service Act, to prevent the spread of communicable diseases between states.

However, Judge Friedrich ruled Wednesday that the CDC did not have the legal authority to impose a nationwide freeze on evictions.

According to Bloomberg, $47 billion in federal aid was slow to reach cash-strapped landlords who were forced to sell their properties to wealthy investors.

The eviction moratorium included all federally backed residential properties nationwide for tenants earning less than $99,000 in annual income.

The CDC had extended the eviction moratorium twice. Judge Friedrich ruled that the CDC overstepped its authority by extending the eviction freeze.

Landlords who violated the eviction moratorium faced fines up to $250,000, one year in jail, or both.

Many landlords filed lawsuits, claiming that the CDC exceeded its authority.

The Biden administration had sought to extend the eviction moratorium through June 30.

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Clay Travis says sports media is "struggling" with the Deshaun Watson case because "It doesn't fit easy identity politics criteria."

The 25-year-old Houston Texans quarterback faces sex assault allegations from multiple massage therapists who say he solicited them for sex on social media.

The OutKick founder says there's a good reason why the media isn't all over the Watson case.

"One reason that this story is receiving almost no sports media attention is because it doesn't fit easy identity politics criteria," Clay said during his radio show OutKick the Coverage on Monday.

"Because you have women who are mostly powerless, and mostly minorities that are usually considered to be victims in cases like these. But then the person who potentially took advantage of them is black in Deshaun Watson, who is typically considered to be a victim in sports media circles too."

Travis continued:

"So what happens when two victim-laden ideologies collide? Your typically woke sports media doesn't know how to cover it because they're going to alienate one side of the equation, in the victimization pyramid, if they pick a side."

Travis compared Watson's case to former NFL quarterback Peyton Manning, who was accused of a mooning incident at the University of Tennessee -- 20 years after the fact.

"Think about the way that Peyton Manning's alleged mooning was covered by ESPN when it became a big story in wake of the Carolina Panthers losing to the Denver Broncos in the Super Bowl a few years ago. Cam Newton didn't shake hands. He stormed out of his press conference. And a result, that imbecile Shaun King, social media woke warrior, decided to go back into Peyton Manning's history and draw up 20-year-old allegations from when he was in college."

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At least 14 women have come forward with allegations of sexual misconduct against Watson.

Five more women have accused the Texans star of misconduct since the first lawsuit was filed in Harris County District Court last week.

The women said the incidents occurred in January and March of this year and around July and August of last year.

The lawsuits accuse Watson of being a sexual predator who victimized women by pretending to seek massage therapy sessions.

"Watson is in the sex trade. He needs to be stopped," according to the lawsuit from the alleged Aug. 2 incident.

Watson vigorously denied any sort of misconduct. He explained that he contacted massage therapists via DMs on Instagram.com because his usual masseuse contacts were on lockdown due to the Covid.

In text messages obtained by an attorney for the plaintiffs, Watson apologized for asking a masseuse if she's "comfortable with the glute area."

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The Houston lawyer representing Deshaun Watson's accusers has revealed alleged texts from the star quarterback apologizing to a masseuse for making her uncomfortable.

The 25-year-old is under fire for allegedly sexually assaulting massage therapists in the Houston area.

One of the texts shows Watson attempting to schedule an appointment with a masseuse before asking if she's "comfortable with the glute area." In another text exchange from March 30, 2020, Watson allegedly apologizes to an accuser.

"Sorry about you feeling uncomfortable," Watson allegedly wrote. "Never were the intentions. Lmk (let me know) if you want to work in the future. My apologies."

After posting the messages on social media, the attorney, Tony Buzbee, said more texts will be posted in addition to copies of the lawsuits.

Watson vigorously denied the allegations on Twitter, saying that he rejected "a baseless six-figure settlement demand" and that this is "about clearing my name."

"I have never treated any woman with anything other than the utmost respect," Watson said in his statement.

Buzbee announced the first lawsuit on Tuesday. Four more lawsuits have been filed against Watson, bringing the total of lawsuits to seven.

Buzbee also said there are now a total of nine women who plan on suing Watson.

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A Texas man who had $17,000 charged to his credit card by a wholesale electricity company during last week's storms may get his money back -- thanks to GoFundMe.

Over 4 million people were without power and clean water in Texas for 5 days last week.

To compound their troubles, wholesale electricity provider Griddy began emptying customers' bank accounts before they had even received invoices.

63-year-old Army veteran Scott Willoughby, who lives on social security payments, lost his life savings when Griddy charged $16,752 to his credit card for 7 days' worth of service.

"My savings is gone," the Dallas resident told the New York Times. "There's nothing I can do about it, but it's broken me."

A GoFundMe account created by Willoughby raised over $12,000 as of Tuesday.

Willoughby wrote in the summary:

"[My payment] went on my credit card and once paid, will almost wipe out my savings and my brother's came straight out of his bank account causing an overdraft. Any and all help is appreciated. Blessings on all!"

Willoughby never lost power during the winter storm. He and other customers were warned by Griddy to change providers before the storm hit. But most electricity providers in the state weren't taking on new customers.

Other customers discovered that Griddy had raided their bank accounts and left them nearly penniless.

Ty Williams had nearly $17,000 deducted from his bank account by Griddy. His family home never lost power during the storm.

Williams told Fox 4 News he did everything he could to conserve energy for those 7 days. "I unplugged refrigerators, I turned off everything. I turned off all the lights. We literally tried to stay in one room and use our gas heaters."

Still, their bill skyrocketed to nearly $17,000 for 7 days' usage. Griddy told Williams the billing was automated and based on estimated usage. The company said it would check the system for errors and make adjustments.

Chambers County resident Lisa Khoury filed a $1 billion lawsuit against Griddy for "unlawful price gouging" during the winter storm.

Khoury, whose average bill is between $200 and $250, said her bill for Feb. 13 through Feb. 19 came to $9,340.

She said Griddy began making withdrawals from her bank account daily.

Khoury said she was only without power for one day and was careful to limit usage out of fear of a high bill.

Some Griddy customers were charged as high as $400 per kilowatt-hour. For those customers, Griddy offered to set up payment arrangements.
 

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Boosie Badazz is planning to file a $20 million racial discrimination lawsuit against Mark Zuckerberg, co-founder and CEO of Facebook, which owns Instagram.

The "Wipe Me Down" rapper told Vlad TV that he believes he was banned from Instagram because of his skin color.

He claims the ban led to him losing lucrative business ventures - to the tune of $20 million. "You're f***ing up my income. I have to feed my kids."

Boosie was reportedly banned from the photo sharing app due to repeated violations of Instagram policies.

During his banishment Boosie made a plea to Mark "Zuckinberger" to reinstate his account. He even offered Zuckerberg $100,000 cash to reinstate his page.

Boosie told Vlad TV that he believes the unintentional mispronunciation of Zuckerberg's last name has led the Facebook chairman to hold a grudge against him.

Boosie said Zuckerberg's actions left him no choice but to file suit.

"(Zuckerberg) made some of my business ventures go down, so I'm suing him now. I'm filing a lawsuit against him now," he said. "He stopped me off Instagram and he didn't put me back on Instagram. And that's affecting my business.

Boosie registered another Instagram account -- @BoosienewIG -- but he said Instagram disabled his ability to go live on IG stories. "I can't go live on my new page at all. I can't go live!"

Boosie said other IG influencers have committed "way worser things" without repercussions or ramifications.

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"This is my first time my Instagram ever been taken from me! So you can give other two million people their Instagram back for derogatory things they did and I didn't do nothing but post a girl with an emoji over her? This is discrimination! Something is wrong. Somebody must be mad because I said they name wrong and they trying to chastise me."

The U.S. Department of Justice (DoJ) is also suing Zuckerberg for discriminating against American IT workers by reserving over 2,600 high-paying jobs for foreign workers holding temporary H1B visas.

The Facebook jobs which offered an average salary of $156,000 were not available to qualified American IT workers.
 

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A federal judge rejected a Justice Department motion to dismiss a defamation lawsuit brought against President Donald Trump by a woman who accused him of rape decades ago.

The federal judge concluded that the president's denials and statements about the case were outside of his official duties.

Writer E. Jean Carroll wrote a book in 2019 claiming Trump raped her during an encounter at a New York department store in the 1990s.

After the publication of Carroll's book, Trump told reporters she made the story up. Carroll then sued Trump for defamation.

The DOJ filed a motion to dismiss the federal lawsuit, saying Trump's denial of the allegation was part of his official duties as president.

The DOJ said Trump was protected because of immunity extended for libel and slander cases under the Federal Tort Claims Act (FTCA).

In a ruling on Tuesday, U.S. District Judge Lewis A. Kaplan rejected the DOJ's claim, writing that the president is not an employee of the government within the meaning of the FTCA, and that even if he were, his statements concerning Carroll were outside the scope of that employment.

Kaplan wrote that Trump's comments "concerned an alleged sexual assault that took place several decades before he took office, and the allegations have no relationship to the official business of the United States..."

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The city of Louisville has agreed to a $12 million settlement with the family of Breonna Taylor. The settlement was announced on Tuesday.

Taylor, 26, was shot to death by police in her apartment six months ago. The deal will include police reforms including a requirement that commanders approve all search warrants before going before a judge, a source told the Courier Journal.

The news of a settlement comes as a grand jury prepares to review evidence in the case this week.

The largest amount Louisville has ever paid in a settlement was $8.5 million to Edwin Chandler in 2012, the Courier Journal reported.

Chandler was wrongfully imprisoned for more than nine years after Detective Mark Handy perjured himself.

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Musician Eddy Grant is suing President Donald Trump for using his 1982 hit song "Electric Avenue" during a campaign video clip.

The video features an animated train with Trump's campaign logo speeding through a town while Biden follows along in a railroad handcar.

Grant's song plays throughout the duration of the video, which ends with letters spelling out "Biden Train" falling off the screen.

"Electric Avenue" plays in the video clip, which Trump tweeted last month. The video clip garnered 13 million views through Tuesday afternoon.

The campaign removed the video, but the 72-year-old Guyanese-British singer-songwriter filed a lawsuit Tuesday, citing Trump for "continued to willfully and wrongfully infringing Plaintiffs' copyrights."

Grant's lawyer noted "substantial damage and irreparable harm has occurred and will continue to occur to my client and his reputation as an artist not affiliated in any way with your campaign."

The Trump campaign has received warnings and legal action after multiple demands to stop using copyrighted music by other musicians in his campaign rallies.
 

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Rappers Gucci Mane (right) and Foogiano (left) have been named in a wrongful death lawsuit over a fatal shooting during a concert at a South Carolina nightclub during the 4th of July weekend.

The administrator for the estate of Mykala Bell, a 23-year-old woman who was fatally shot during the concert, filed the lawsuit in Greenville County last week, editors at The Greenville News reported Monday.

According to legal papers, the mother of two was standing near the stage when gunfire broke out in the early hours of July 5 at Lavish Lounge where Foogiano was performing.

Security guard Clarence Sterling Johnson, 51, was also killed and eight others were injured in the melee.

Police charged a Georgia man Jarquez Kezavion Cooper, 22, in the shooting and said it appeared to be gang-related - but the new lawsuit alleges Foogiano, real name Kwame Brown, and his entourage were not patted down before they entered the club and were allowed inside with "deadly weapons".

The lawsuit adds that Gucci, real name Radric Delantic Davis, was "believed to be" a promoter for the concert, though it did not say whether he was present at the time of the shooting.

Cooper is also named, as well as the club's operating company, its owner and nearly a dozen other unspecified "owners, managers, operators, independent contractors, and/or security companies" accused of negligence for failing to provide adequate surveillance and security, and "permitting criminal activity," among other allegations.

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In a video posted to his Instagram feed shortly after the incident occurred, Foogiano, best known for hits "Molly (Baby Mama)" and "Finesser," insisted the shooting, "ain't my fault. I don't promote violence."

"I understand y'all in pain y'all hurting... but y'all just got to look to the situation," he said in the clip. "I ain't going to blame myself for something I didn't cause."

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) plans to stop calling the coronavirus an epidemic because of a major drop in deaths.

The death rate has fallen so low that "the percentage is currently at the epidemic threshold."

"Based on death certificate data, the percentage of deaths attributed to pneumonia, influenza or COVID-19 (PIC) decreased from 9.0% during week 25 to 5.9% during week 26, representing the tenth week of a declining percentage of deaths due to PIC," the CDC wrote on its website.

In a leaked memo in April, the CDC urged doctors to classify "probable" deaths as COVID-19-related.

The memo stated tests were not necessary to confirm COVID-related death. Doctors complained that the COVID-19 death rate was artificially inflated.

As a result of the CDC's memo, many family members were denied insurance payouts since insurance companies do not cover pandemic-related illnesses.

Families filed lawsuits against doctors and hospitals which effectively ended the false diagnoses and the COVID-19 death rate tumbled.