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Broward Sheriff's Office

A Florida judge declared a mistrial on Monday after three jurors refused to convict Dayonte Resiles based on his race.

Resiles allegedly broke into the Davie, Florida home of Jill Halliburton Su, 59, to commit a burglary back in September 2014.

When he found Su inside her home, he tied her up, stabbed her to death and left her body in a bathtub.

His DNA was found on a knife and inside the home.

Two years after his arrest, Resiles escaped from a Broward County courtroom. He was caught six days later.

Resiles finally went to trial just before Thanksgiving. After six days of deliberations, three jurors refused to sign off on a verdict.

The jury forewoman told the judge she disagreed with the three jurors.

"The whole time I'm staring at the judge and at the clerk, and we're locking eyes, and I'm looking at each one of them,” said the jury forewoman. "They're just waiting for my verdict of either 'yes, I agree' or 'no,' and I just couldn't, and that's why I said no."

The forewoman later said she received threats from other jurors. She said three of the jurors refused to convict Resiles of at least second-degree murder because they didn't want to send "a young Black man" to prison for the rest of his life or sentence him to death.

"You guys keep saying 'a young Black man,' but I don’t see race," said the forewoman. "I just see a human being, and you know, one particular person said to me, 'Hey, if you were outside this courtroom, you would have gotten smacked out in the street for this.'"

"The society that we're in right now, it needs to change, and just not look at color of skin. I feel like we need to look at each other as human beings, as who we are," she said.

The judge declared a mistrial and announced Resiles will go on trial again -- with 12 new jurors -- in January 2022.

He faces life in prison or the death penalty if convicted.

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The jury in the Kyle Rittenhouse trial surprised everyone by asking to rewatch the drone video footage that the prosecution allegedly withheld from the defense.

According to Fox News, the request by the jury was not "unexpected" for a complicated case.

Late Tuesday, the jury retired for the night after failing to reach a verdict. Two jurors allegedly withheld their verdicts out of fear of public "backlash".

Rittenhouse's legal team filed a motion for a mistrial late Tuesday after they learned the prosecution had a high-definition video of Rittenhouse shooting the first victim.

The defense argued that the high-def video was not given to them until Friday or Saturday.

On Wednesday morning, the jury halted deliberations again to request they be allowed to rewatch the drone footage of the August 25, 2020 shooting of Antifa protester Joseph Rosenbaum.
 

 
The prosecution explained to Judge Bruce Schroeder why the copy of drone footage was "compressed" which caused the video to be blurred.

Assistant District Attorney James Kraus claimed he sent the high-definition video footage to one of Rittenhouse's attorneys. He claims the video was "compressed" by the lawyer's Android phone.

Evidence is usually emailed between attorneys via Dropbox.

Watch the video below.
 

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Sean Krajacic-Pool/Getty Images

In a surprise move late Tuesday, the legal team for Kyle Rittenhouse filed a motion for a mistrial after accusing prosecutors of withholding crucial evidence.

By law the prosecution is obligated to share all evidence with the defense and vice versa.

However, prosecutors for the state of Wisconsin allegedly held back high-definition drone footage of Rittenhouse shooting the first victim, Antifa protester Joseph Rosenbaum.

Prosecutors provided the defense with a blurred copy of the shooting.

The footage was filmed with a $40,000 Chinese-made DJI drone operated by federal agents on the night of the Jacob Blake protests in Kenosha in August 2020.

The footage shows Rittenhouse, then 17, being pursued through a parking lot by Rosenbaum. In the video, Rittenhouse spun around and shot Rosenbaum with his AR-15 assault rifle from a distance of less than 3 feet.

The jurors could barely make out the scene in the blurred video copy shown in court.

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In his closing argument on Friday, lead prosecutor Thomas Binger claimed Rittenhouse shot Rosenbaum "multiple times" in the back as he lay on the ground dying.

An autopsy determined Rosenbaum was shot in the hand, groin and back.

The state's case for first-degree reckless homicide is based on the autopsy findings.

But the prosecutor's high-definition copy of the drone video shows Rittenhouse fired only once at Rosenbaum from the front -- not the back -- and not while he was on the ground.

Late Tuesday, Rittenhouse's legal team asked Judge Bruce Schroeder to declare a mistrial with prejudice, meaning the state can't refile charges against Rittenhouse.

Judge Schroeder said he would consider the motion.

See comparisons of the blurred video provided to the defense team and the high-definition copy withheld by the prosecution below.
 

Sean Krajacic-Pool/Getty Images

"Inexcusable", "Jury intimidation", were some of the reactions of gun experts and others after Assistant District Attorney Thomas Binger pointed an AR-15 rifle at the jury during the Kyle Rittenhouse trial on Monday.

Rittenhouse, 18, faces multiple charges for shooting three Antifa protestors, killing 2 of them, during a night of unrest that erupted in Kenosha, WI after a police officer shot and wounded Jacob Blake.

Gun experts accused Binger of violating the 5 basic rules of gun safety by pointing a gun at the jury with his finger on the trigger.

Binger claims someone checked the rifle to make sure it was unloaded, but Binger never checked the rifle himself before pointing it at the jury.

The first rule of gun safety is the gun is always loaded.

The jury will begin deliberating Rittenhouse's guilt or innocence today, Nov. 16. Observers are concerned that the prosecutor's actions during closing arguments on Monday will negatively influence the jury.

Many believe Binger was attempting to intimidate the jury since the trial didn't go his way. Others accused the lead prosecutor of intentionally pulling a stunt to get a mistrial.

Rittenhouse, who lives part-time with his father in Kenosha, drove just over the border from his mother's home in Antioch, Illinois the night of the protests in August 2020.

He was 17 at the time of the shootings and armed with a borrowed AR-15 assault rifle. He said he went there to help protect a car dealership from rioters.

The Judge threw out a weapons possession charge against Rittenhouse, since Wisconsin law permits youths under 18 to carry long guns for hunting purposes.

AFP via Getty Images

The judge presiding over the Derek Chauvin murder trial in Minnesota slammed congresswoman Maxine Waters' "abhorrent" behavior in open court on Monday.

Chauvin faces life in prison if found guilty of first degree murder in the death of George Floyd.

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Waters, a Los Angeles congresswoman, traveled to Brooklyn Center, Minnesota to "incite violence" if Chauvin is acquitted of murder.

Judge Peter Cahill responded to a defense request for a mistrial over the comments made by Waters.

Chauvin's defense raised concerns with the judge over the impact the congresswoman's inflammatory words may have over the jury.

The judge had strong words for Ms. Waters before denying the defense's request for a mistrial.

The judge said Waters' words may be enough to overturn any guilty verdict on appeal.

"Congresswoman Waters may have given you something on appeal that may result in this whole trial being overturned," Cahill said.

Cahill slammed Waters' behavior as "abhorrent" and "disrespectful".

"I wish elected officials would stop talking about this case," said Cahill, "especially in a manner that is disrespectful to the rule of law and to the judicial branch and our function."

He added that "if they want to give their opinions, they should do so in a respectful way and in a manner that is consistent with their oath to the Constitution, to respect the co-equal branch of government."

He continued: "Their failure to do so I think is abhorrent, but I don’t think it's prejudiced us with additional material that would prejudice this jury. They have been told not to watch the news. I trust they are following those instructions and that there is not in any way a prejudice to the defendant beyond the articles that were talking specifically about the facts of this case."

Waters responded to the controversy on Monday morning, telling theGrio.com that the "KKK and other white supremacists" are blowing her words out of proportion.

“Republicans will jump on any word, any line and try to make it fit their message and their cause for denouncing us and denying us, basically calling us violent ... any time they see an opportunity to seize on a word, so they do it and they send a message to all of the white supremacists, the KKK, the Oath Keepers, the [Proud] Boys and all of that, how this is a time for [Republicans] to raise money on [Democrats] backs,” Waters said.

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The jury viewed gruesome crime scene photos on day 2 of Henry Segura's 2nd murder trial on Wednesday. Segura is accused of killing his ex-girlfriend, Brandi Peters, her six-year-old twin daughters, Tamiyah and Taniyah Peters, and his own son, 3-year-old JaVante Segura.

All four bodies were found in Peters’ Tallahassee, Florida home on Nov. 20, 2010.

A medical examiner testified on Thursday that Brandi Peters, 27, was pistol whipped, beaten with a heavy, round object and shot to death. Evidence shows she fought for her life.

The bodies of her three children were found stacked in a bathtub. Tamiyah was shot in the back of the head and drowned and the other two children were drowned.

Segura was arrested 10 months later in Le Sueru County, Minnesota, where he fled after the murders.

At the time of the murders, Peters was a single, stay-at-home mother. Prosecutors claim the motive for the murders was $20,100 in child support payments Segura owed Peters for the care of his son, JaVante Segura.

Though Segura signed JaVante's birth certificate, he later claimed Peters told him the boy wasn't his. He said he was in the process of asking the state to perform a DNA test because he couldn't afford the several hundred dollars for the test.

In Segura's first murder trial in 2015, the jury was told his DNA was not found at the crime scene despite his testimony that he had sex with the victim.

The DNA of an unknown female was found under Peters' finger nails, and the DNA of an unknown male was also present on a door handle, bolt lock, phone cradle, Peters' purse, and a shovel at the scene.

Additionally, police recovered a mixed DNA sample from the victim's bedroom phone that was later matched to Angel Avila-Quinones, a member of a Colombian drug cartel who had just been released from federal prison.

Avila-Quinones fled to Italy, where investigators interviewed him but were unable to bring him to the United States due to Italy's tough extradition laws.

The jury did not hear about the DNA match because the evidence was ruled inadmissible in court. Prosecutors claimed Avila-Quinones left the country in 2009, before the murders.

Kelsey Kinard, Segura's former cellmate in an Oklahoma jail, testified that Segura confessed to the four murders in 2011.

A judge declared a mistrial when the jury couldn't reach a unanimous verdict in 2015.

hung jury in Freddie Gray case

The jury is hung in the trial of Officer William Porter, one of six officers indicted in the death of Freddie Gray.

Gray, 25, died of complications due to a severed spine he suffered during a "rough ride" in the back of a police van in April.

Freddie Gray's death sparked civil unrest and rioting that left 20 officers injured and millions of dollars in property damage in Baltimore.

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