Photo may have been deleted

Instagram

Jovita Moore is resting and recovering ahead of her move to a rehab facility after undergoing brain surgery one week ago.

Channel 2 Action News reports she is expected to remain in the hospital through Friday, April 23, when she will move to a rehab facility to continue her healing process.

Jovita was diagnosed with two small brain tumors after noticing neurological symptoms on April 12.

Just before going on air that day, Jovita told Channel 2's Justin Farmer that she wasn't feeling great.

Photo may have been deleted

Instagram

"I was really concerned about why all of a sudden I was forgetful, disoriented and just not feeling myself. Feeling like I was in a fog and really wanting to get out of that fog," Jovita said.

Later, as she walked through a grocery store parking lot, she felt lightheaded. "I was walking. I remember walking across parking lot and feeling like I wasn't going to make it to the door. I was walking like in quicksand," Jovita said.

"It was a blessing in disguise that I almost passed out walking into Publix," Jovita said.

A brain scan revealed the brain tumors.

"It's significant. It's gonna be a lot," Jovita said before the surgery. "We had to start then having a conversation about what that was and what that meant."

"Not sure when I'll be back on air but when I'm able, I will be," she said.

More than 23,000 viewers left messages of support for Jovita on her WSB-TV page.

Cards and flowers for Jovita may be sent to WSB-TV (1601 W. Peachtree St. NE, Atlanta, Ga. 30309).

Prince Williams/FilmMagic

Emmy-winning news anchor Jovita Moore underwent surgery to remove two small brain tumors early Friday morning.

Jovita worked as a news reporter and anchor at Channel 2 Action News for two decades.

[Click here to leave your well wishes for Jovita]

Just before going on the air Monday, Jovita told Channel 2's Justin Farmer that she wasn't feeling well.

Later, as she walked through a grocery store parking lot, she felt lightheaded. "I was walking. I remember walking across parking lot and feeling like I wasn't going to make it to the door. I was walking like in quicksand," Jovita said.

Marcus Ingram/Getty Images

She was rushed to an emergency room, where a brain scan revealed two small brain masses.

Jovita told co-workers she was sometimes "forgetful, disoriented and just not feeling myself."

What is a Brain Tumor?

A brain tumor occurs when abnormal brain cells clump together to form a mass. As the tumor grows, it presses on the surrounding tissue. Eventually, the pressure on surrounding structures causes symptoms, such as in Jovita's case.

Brain tumors can remain in the brain or metastasize (spread) elsewhere in the body.

Cancer in other parts of the body, such as the lungs, can metastasize to the brain.

Tumors may be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).

What are the risk factors for a brain tumor?

A family history of cancer is one of the risk factors. About 5 to 10 percent of all cancers are hereditary.

Brain tumors are diagnosed more often in Caucasians and biracial, mixed people.

Certain chemicals, such as industrial cleaners, solvents, or medications can increase your risk for brain cancer.

Exposure to radiation can also increase risk.

According to the American Brain Tumor Association, people who never had childhood chicken pox are at greater risk of getting brain tumors.

Signs and symptoms of a brain tumor

Signs and symptoms of a brain tumor depends on the type, size, and location of the tumor within the brain. The space surrounding the brain inside the skull doesn't allow for much wiggle room. A tumor, or even an aneursym, will press on surrounding tissues causing noticeable signs and symptoms.

Signs & symptoms include:

  • Headache
  • Dizziness, lightheadedness, vertigo
  • Blurred or double vision
  • Loss of balance
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Seizures
  • Confusion, disorientation
  • Change in mental status
  • Memory loss
  • Hand tremors
  • Difficulty walking
  • Numbness or tingling on one side of the body
  • Difficulty speaking
  •  

    How are brain tumors diagnosed?

    Your doctor will order diagnostic tests and perform a physical exam. The doctor will use an ophthalmoscope to visualize your optic nerves inside your eues. The scope shines a light in your eyes to see if your pupils are unequal or dilated.

    Diagnostic tests include CT scan, MRI, angiography and skull X-rays.

    How are brain tumors treated?

    Treatment depends on the type, size, and location of the tumor. The most common treatment is surgery to remove the tumor.

    Surgery can also be combined with chemotherapy and radiation.

    There are risks involved with brain surgery, such as loss of mobility, loss of speech and paralysis. Post-surgical infection is also likely.

    Patients may temporarily lose the ability to walk or speak after surgery, depending on the location of the tumor that was removed.

    Some patients will require physical therapy or speech therapy after surgery.

    This has been your Medical Minute.
     

    DISCLAIMER

    Any medical information published on this blog is for your general information only and is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice. You should not take any action before consulting with your personal physician or a health care provider. Sandrarose.com and its affiliates cannot be held liable for any damages incurred by following information found on this blog.

    JoeBiden.com via Getty Images

    Former Vice President Joe Biden is not the same Joe Biden who served as former President Barack Obama's right-hand man. Today's Joe Biden is a shell of the man he used to be.

    He is the subject of mean-spirited internet memes and insensitive nicknames such as "Dementia Joe" and "Creepy Joe."

    There is even a website, joebidenhasdementia.com, that documents every instance of Biden's apparent mental decline.

    Despite his momentary mental lapses, Biden insists he does not have dementia. But his critics aren't so sure.

    What is Dementia?

    Dementia describes a group of neurological symptoms affecting memory, thought process, language, problem-solving, mobility and activities of daily living.

    What causes dementia?

    Alzheimer's is the most common cause of dementia. Other common causes of dementia include head trauma, Parkinson's disease, strokes, HIV/AIDS, medications, and vascular disorders that affect blood supply to the brain. There are more than 50 conditions that can cause dementia.

    Causes of dementia that can easily be reversed include hypothyroidism, vitamin B12 deficiency, Lyme disease, and neurosyphilis. Hearing loss may also be associated with dementia.

    What is Senile Dementia?

    Senile dementia is the long-term loss of cognitive, physical and intellectual ability caused by degeneration of brain cells. The condition is associated with old age and is incurable. Approximately 10% of people over the age of 65 have senile dementia.

    People with senile dementia will exhibit a decrease in cognitive and physical abilities, including inability to concentrate, recall information, problem-solve, speak, or feed and dress themselves without assistance.

    Signs & Symptoms

    Early signs of senile dementia include memory loss, forgetfulness, insomnia, confusion, disorientation (not knowing day or date), word salad (random words or phrases that don't make sense), fatigue, poor physical coordination (falling down often), withdrawing socially, poor short-term memory.

    Late stage signs of senile dementia include gradual weight loss caused by forgetting to eat or lack of appetite, unable to remember family members, wandering and getting lost, loss of all cognitive ability, loss of communication, poor short-term and long-term memory, poor personal hygiene, unable to bathe or dress self, loss of mobility, incontinence (involuntary defecation or urination), violent outbursts, visual and auditory hallucinations.

    Treatment

    There is no cure for senile dementia. Medications are prescribed to manage the symptoms. The medications are Aricept (donepezil), Excelon (rivastigmine) and Reminyl (galantamine).

    This has been your Medical Minute.
     

    More Info on the Web

    13 Types of Dementia, Symptoms, Causes | Medicinenet.com

    10 Early Symptoms of Dementia | Healthline

    Dementia - Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, Treatments | alz.org
     

    DISCLAIMER

    Any medical information published on this blog is for your general information only and is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice. You should not take any action before consulting with your personal physician or a health care provider. Sandrarose.com and its affiliates cannot be held liable for any damages incurred by following information found on this blog.

    Scott Olson/Getty Images

    Joe Biden held a "virtual roundtable" on Thursday afternoon after fellow Democrats begged him to come out of the basement and speak to the people.

    Biden, who reportedly suffers from senile dementia, struggled badly while trying to discuss the coronavirus.

    The roundtable featured Biden along with embattled Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy and Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont, discussing the coronavirus pandemic.

    When it was Biden's turn to talk, the 77-year-old struggled while trying to read off a teleprompter. He said more than 85,000 jobs have been lost and millions of people have died from the coronavirus. The numbers should have been the other way around.

    It was sad to watch.

    "We're ... in the middle of a pandemic that has cost us more than 85,000 jobs as of today. Lives of millions of people. Millions of people. Millions of jobs. You know, and we're in a position where, you know we just got new unemployment insurance, this morning, uh, numbers — 36.5 million claims since this crisis began."

    President Donald Trump -- who has no pity for Biden's mental decline -- belittled the former vice president on Thursday.

    Trump said, "Joe has absolutely no idea what's happening... He doesn't know he's alive."

    Scott Dudelson/Getty Images

    Fans are concerned for Atlanta rapper Lil Baby's health after viral video shows him jerking uncontrollably during a radio interview. The "Perfect Timing" rapper exhibited involuntary jerking movements of his head and upper torso during a recent interview with Atlanta's Hot 107.9.

    Read more »

    Photo

    Colleton County officials say no charges will be filed against the 5th grader involved in a classroom fight with 10-year-old RaNiya Wright last month. A coroner ruled that RaNiya died of natural causes two days later in an intensive care unit.

    Read more »

    Hillary Clinton

    Hillary Clinton's other shoe dropped, literally, at a 9/11 memorial event in New York City on Sunday.

    Clinton, 69, abruptly left the September 11th Commemoration Ceremony because she was reportedly "overheated" in 82-degree weather in New York City.

    Read more »