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Twitter blocked a divisive hashtag comparing Senator Tim Scott to racist "Uncle Tom" that depicts Black people as sellouts.

The Republican Party chose Scott to deliver the rebuttal to Joe Biden's first ever speech before 200 members of Congress on Wednesday night.

The 46th president spoke for about an hour to a nearly empty room due to Covid concerns -- despite the fact that he is fully vaccinated.

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After Biden's speech, Scott, the Republican senator from South Carolina, said the United States is not a racist country and most Americans are not racists.

Scott spoke of an unfriendlier time in America when he experienced discrimination.

He argued that the same party that claims to fight white supremacy is the most intolerant of others.

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"I get called Uncle Tom and the N-word by progressives ... I know first-hand, our healing is not finished,' he said.

"Hear me clearly: America is not a racist country."

The hashtag "Uncle Tim" began trending on Twitter soon after he spoke.

Bishop Talbert Swan, a black pastor from Massachusetts, tweeted: "Uncle Tim Scott has perfected the art of sycophantic bootlicking. He's a master step n fetch it artist and cunning white supremacy apologist, who demonstrated his buck dancing skills in front of the entire world."

But others pointed out the hypocrisy that exists on social media.

One Twitter user wrote:

"The fact that "Uncle Tim" is trending on Twitter tells you all you need to know about the left."

Another user tweeted:

"Not stunned that Uncle Tim is trending because how dare even one black person not follow the Democrats like the Pied Piper. How dare Sen Tim Scott have his own opinions and principles?"

Twitter allowed the hashtag to trend for hours before it was finally blocked.

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Singer Akon is encouraging Black Americans to "let go of the past" and move on from the brutal history of slavery.

The 47-year-old Senegalese star insists his fellow Africans have "overcome" their past and the cruelty their ancestors faced as slave traders ripped families apart.

"We've kind of overcome the thought of slavery, we don't even think about it," Akon said during a new interview with VladTV.

"The only time we think about it, honestly, is when we're doing tours at Goree Island. Outside of that, people have lived and moved way beyond the slavery concept."

Goree is a tiny island off the main harbor of Dakar, Senegal, a pivotal destination for slave trading from the 15th to 19th centuries.

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Akon believes American Blacks could benefit by "letting go" of slavery, because it's such a large weight to carry. He said Black people will never make progress until they let go of the past.

"I think it's the art of just letting the past go and moving towards the future. I think, in the U.S., they have this stigma of just not letting go of the past and blaming the past on every mishap or, you know, disappointment. I think as long as you hold onto that past, there's a lot of weight that you carry with you everywhere you go. It's hard to move forward and move fast when you've got a weight on your back. You just gotta let it go."

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The "Smack That" singer urges "brainwashed" Black Americans to travel to Africa, where they'll be accepted.

"Do you want to stay here (in America) and continue to be treated this way or just go back home, where you're no longer the minority. You actually are the majority, and you control your destiny, your future, and your land... They just need to go... America did a good job at brainwashing (them). The moment you mention Africa, they start shaking. They don't even know why."

Watch Akon's interview below.
 

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Charlamagne tha god ripped Joe Biden for saying President Trump was the first racist to be elected president.

The 77-year-old Democrat chastised Trump for repeatedly referring to the COVID-19 pandemic as the "China virus" or the "Wuhan virus".

"The way he deals with people based on the color of their skin, their national origin, where they're from, is absolutely sickening," Biden said during a virtual townhall from his basement in Delaware on Wednesday.

Biden added, "No sitting president has ever done this. Never, never, never. No Republican president has done this. No Democratic president."

His remark confused and angered some Americans who accused Biden of rewriting America's racist past.

The New York City radio host was among Biden's more vocal critics. "I really wish Joe Biden would shut the eff up forever and continue to act like he's starring in the movie 'A Quiet Place,' because as soon as he opens his mouth and makes noise, he gets us all killed," Charlamagne said on The Breakfast Club on Friday.

Charlamagne gave Biden the "Donkey of the Day" title, saying, "Joe, you got to hurry up and announce your Black woman VP so I can be enthused about voting for her because I will never be enthused about voting for you. You know America is a terrible place when Kanye West seems like a viable option."
 

 

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Rapper Lil Baby got into a heated debate with Rolling Stone writer Charles Holmes, after the journalist insisted, "Black people can't be racist."

The 25-year-old rapper, who topped the U.S. Billboard 200 with his second album My Turn earlier this year, was discussing police corruption and systemic racism with Holmes.

The two men discussed a line in his song "The Bigger Picture,", "Corrupted police been the problem where I'm from / But I'd be lying if I said it was all of them."

Holmes said there can't be "good police in a fundamentally flawed and racist system".

But Lil Baby disagreed: "Just 'cause you work in a racist system doesn't mean you racist."

"Damn near every system that got a job is a racist system. You know what I mean?" said the rapper, real name Dominique Armani Jones.

"CEOs be like old white people. You never know, they got to be some kind of racist 'cause at some certain age... that was the way of life almost. So I almost feel like all these corporations or whatnot may be racist. And black people are racist too."

"Black people can't be racist," the writer said in disagreement, prompting Baby to respond, "Why? Racist means to be just to your race."

Holmes explained: "Well, the thing about racism is you would have to have some type of power, and Black people, historically speaking, don't have any power to be racist. We can be prejudiced."

"To me, a racist is someone who treats a different race than theirs a different way than they would treat theirs," the "Drip Too Hard" rapper said.

"I feel like if you're a black person and you treat all black people one way and all white people one way, you're racist. I'm not a racist, so I give a white person a chance to talk and actually we get into it before I can say I don't like you or not."

He added: "I feel the same way about a black person. You ain't gon' be my buddy just 'cause you're black. Just straight up."

In unrelated news, Lil Baby dropped aspiring rapper 42 Dugg from his 4PF label after the rapper dropped what sounds like a homosexual reference on a track.

It sounds like the rapper says: "I was out here suckin' d**k / I was tryna pay the rent."

But after the backlash on Twitter, 42 Dugg clarified the lyrics, tweeting: "HOES OUT HERE SUCKIN D**K… I WAS TRYNA PAY HER RENT."

But fans aren't convinced that's what he said on the track. Listen below and decide for yourself (if you care).
 

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Porsha Williams teared up while discussing racism in America and the ongoing George Floyd protests.

"Extra" spoke to Porsha, who recently attended protests in Atlanta.

Overcome with emotion, she said, "It's just difficult to keep waking up and seeing more and more death.

"More black people being killed and even more and more white people being mistreated at the protests. It's just hard to wake up and see what we're dealing with."

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Porsha said her 15-month-old daughter, Pilar Jhena, is part of the driving force to fight for change, explaining, "When I see my daughter, it's just like... 'I'm gonna fight. I'm gonna push.' I don't want her to have to deal with this. I don't want anyone to have to deal with this, honestly," she said tearfully.

The 38-year-old took to social media to explain how she and others were tear-gassed by police on the frontlines of an Atlanta protest.

"That was just awful. It really was... It was disheartening to be out there and try to be heard and wanted to send this powerful message that we are standing together in a visual way... And to be gassed felt like I was being silenced."

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The reality star, who has been active with Black Lives Matter in both Breonna Taylor and Floyd's cases, vowed to keep fighting emphasizing, "It was tough for me to go back out there after that. It was a bit traumatizing. But I'll tell you what it really taught me is that protesting is a real thing... You are definitely putting your life on the line."

"I am a black woman and I'm always gonna be proud of that," Williams continued. "And I'm always going to stand... with my people against injustice."

On a lighter note, Porsha is getting ready to celebrate her birthday. "My birthday is coming up June 22 — that's exciting. I’ll be 39, closer to 40.”

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Racism is everywhere, but British-born actress Jodie Turner-Smith and her husband, Joshua Jackson, are contemplating raising their child outside of the U.S. because of white supremacy.

"The racial dynamics over here are fraught," Turner-Smith told People.com. "White supremacy is overt. It's the reason I don't want to raise my kids here. I don't want my kids to grow up doing active shooter drills at school."

The 'Queen & Slim' star, 33, is expecting her first child with Jackson, 41. She said she has felt hostile reactions from the Black community over being an interracial couple.

"There was this wave of people who were upset that I was possibly married to a white man," she said. "In America interracial dating or marriage is not something that is as accepted. Certain people feel strongly against it, in both communities. I felt it from the Black community. It is so complicated. I don't want to give it too much energy."

She said she was initially excited to move to America and meet other Black people, but it felt like a "huge culture shock" because she claims she was "rejected by the Black community."

Turner-Smith and other British actors were criticized by the Black community for taking acting roles away from American-born Black actors.