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Realtor.com, Facebook

A Florida couple invited guests to their lavish wedding at a 16,300 square foot mansion complete with a tennis court, bowling alley and pool with a waterfall.

In their glossy wedding invitation, Courtney Wilson and Shenita Jones - who referred to themselves as "the Royal couple" - claimed they owned the sprawling $5.6 million mansion with 15 bathrooms.

They called the Southwest Ranches mansion their "dream home" and they said God sent them a message to hold their dream wedding there.

However, the homeowner didn't receive the same message from God.

Nathan Finkel's late father, who owned the mansion, was an early IHOP restaurant franchisee. Finkel recently listed it the home for over $5 million.

Finkel was baffled when Wilson showed up outside the gate on Saturday morning to set up for the wedding.

The homeowner told Wilson he never gave them permission to hold their nuptials there.

"I have people trespassing on my property," Finkel told a 911 dispatcher, the South Florida Sun Sentinel reported Wednesday.

"And they keep harassing me, calling me. They say they're having a wedding here and it's God's message. I don't know what's going on. All I want is (for) it to stop. And they're sitting at my property right at the front gate right now."

Police arrived promptly and told Wilson and his friends to hit the road. No arrests were made.

Wilson previously toured the home as a potential buyer. He fell in love with the property and fancied himself and his new bride living there.

Then he received the Divine message from God telling him the home was his free and clear.

Squatters around the country claim to receive that same Divine message.

"The guy figured it was a vacant house and didn't realize Nathan lived on the property in a different home," Poliakoff said. "This guy had no idea he lived there. You know the shock that must have been on his face when he showed up at the gate and the owner was home?"

Mike Pont/Getty Images

An aspiring rapper called into The Breakfast Club to accuse washed up rapper Safaree Samuels of scamming him out of $1,000 for a feature on a mixtape.

The Breakfast Club radio co-hosts were discussing reports that comedian Kevin Hart was defrauded out of $1.2 million by a former employee.

They opened the phone lines to the public, and one man called in to say he was scammed by Nicki Minaj's ex.

The man said the scammer was Safaree (and not an imposter) because he DM'd the aspiring producer's blue check (verified) Instagram account.

"This how he got me. He hit me up first actually on Instagram," the aspiring rapper explained.

"He was like, 'Yo, your track is hot.' He told me that he could do a little promo for me, throw my track on Spotify, on the playlist for me and all that for $1,000. So, I paid him, and weeks and months go by. So, I'm hitting him up. He said, 'Oh, I forgot you on this tape so I got you on the next project.' It was supposed to drop in November. So, after November, he completely stopped responding and he basically got me out of $1,000, so I just have to take my L."

Safaree, like other broke artists who were hard hit by the pandemic, created an OnlyFans account to make ends meet.

Safaree did not respond to a blogger's message for a comment on the allegations.
 

 

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Paras Griffin/Getty Images

A woman who believed she was communicating with pop singer Bruno Mars via text messages was scammed out $100,000 -- her entire savings.

The 63-year-old victim, a resident of Texas, believed she was "in love" with the 35-year-old singer.

The woman told police she assumed she was in contact with 11-time Grammy Award winner "Bruno Mars" after she received text messages showing Mars performing while he was on tour.

In September 2018, "Mars" asked the woman to send him a $10,000 check to help cover his touring expenses, and she agreed, according to authorities.

She went to a local branch of the Wells Fargo bank in North Richland Hills and withdrew a cashier's check made out to "Basil Chidiadi Amadi," a person described as a "friend of the band," according to authorities.

The woman deposited the check into an account at JPMorgan Chase bank.

Two days later, "Mars" contacted the woman again and asked for another $90,000, which she withdrew in a cashier's check that was made out to "Chi Autos" at the request of "Mars," according to TMZ.

The $90,000 check was deposited on September 14, 2018 into a separate bank account at JPMorgan Chase, according to investigators.

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TMZ

Investigators subpoenaed bank records and traced the two JPMorgan Chase accounts to Nigerian scammer Chinwendu Azuonwu, 39, and his co-conspirator Basil Amadi, 29, both residents of Houston.

Azuonwu, 39, appeared in court on Tuesday to face charges of impersonating Mars on Instagram to swindle the victim out of her life savings.

Azuonwu said he did not know how $90,000 was deposited into his account, according to the criminal complaint. He also denied knowing Amadi or the woman.

Azuonwu and Amadi are charged with third-degree felony money laundering, KPRC-TV reported. Azuonwu's bail was set at $30,000.

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Gwinnett County PD

A former employee at a Kroger store in north Georgia is accused of scamming the supermarket chain out of nearly $1 million.

Gwinnett County police say Tre Brown, 19, created more than 40 returns for $980,000 worth of non-existent items, and spread the refunds out over several different credit cards.

The refunds ranged from $75 to more than $87,000, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports.

Corporate employees tipped off law enforcement officers after they noticed the fraudulent transactions while the employee who normally flags unusual transactions was on vacation.

Brown used his ill-gotten proceeds to buy clothes, sneakers, shotguns, and two cars.

Police say the Atlanta teenager had just bought a brand new Chevrolet Camaro when he was arrested Thursday. He has since been released from hail on $11,200 bond, CBS News reported.

Police say a "large sum of money" was returned to Kroger following the arrest.

Prince Williams/Wireimage

Trey Songz is accused of scamming his OnlyFans subscribers to fatten his pockets.

The 36-year-old singer is the latest washed-up celebrity to launch an OnlyFans account to make ends meet until the economy rebounds.

According to Rhymeswithsnitch, disgruntled OnlyFans subscribers claim he charged them $100 for a photo of himself in a shower with a female's hand around his neck.

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Instagram

His fans are upset because they wanted to see more. His body wasn't even soapy. One fan wrote: "Trey Songz charged his OF subscribers $100 for this pic. djdndsksks worms for brains!"

Celebrities are going broke amid the ongoing coronavirus outbreak. Paid bookings and club appearances are drying up as clubs and other businesses are forced to close down.

Fans don't mind paying for OnlyFans content, as long as the content is risqué and NSFW. They say a photo of Trey from the chest up is not worth $100 or any price.

Question: Would you pay $100 for a picture of Trey Songz?